DSM-5 released: Media, professional and advocacy reaction: Round up #5

Post #255 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-346

For earlier responses to the release of DSM-5 see Posts #254, #253, #252, #251 and #249

Division of Clinical Psychology

Earlier this month, the Division of Clinical Psychology (DCP), a division of the British Psychological Society, published a Position Statement on the “Classification of Behaviour and Experience in Relation to Functional Psychiatric Diagnoses, Time for a Paradigm Shift.”

Lucy Johnstone, who helped formulate the DCP’s Position Statement, contributed to a BBC Radio 3 broadcast, last night.

BBC Radio 3

Duration: 45 minutes | One year left to listen | First broadcast: Wednesday 22 May 2013

Night Waves May 22, 2013

Segment starts at 23:45 mins in and runs for 15 mins

Khaled Hosseini, Man Booker International Prize, Disgraced, the Future of Psychiatry, with Rana Mitter

“The British Psychological Society’s division of clinical psychology is calling for a ‘paradigm shift’ in psychiatry away from diagnosis. They claim treating ‘mental distress’ as an illness stigmatises sufferers and leads us to ignore more complicated social dimensions to conditions like depression or schizophrenia. So what is the way forward for psychiatry? Rana is joined by Lucy Johnstone who helped formulate the BPS’s position, consultant psychiatrist Tom Burns, and the historian of psychiatry Matthew Smith.”


Critical Psychiatry Network

The Critical Psychiatry Network (CPN) has issued a statement on DSM-5, dated May 22, 2013. The Statement can be downloaded from this page or the PDF opened, here, on Dx Revision Watch: CPN statement on DSM-5


Social Justice Solutions

“Is a social worker conceived and operated organization born out of the Stony Brook School of Social Welfare’s commitment to active participation in creating a socially just world.”

In DSM-5: A Call to Opposition for Social Workers, Georgianna Dolan-Reilly, LMSW, calls on the organization’s constituency to oppose DSM-5sign the Open Letter developed by the Society for Humanistic Psychology, Division 32 of the American Psychological Association, and criticizes the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) for not issuing its position on DSM-5.


Social Work Helper

Follow Up Interview with Dr Allen Frances: Dishing the Dirt on the DSM 5 Deona Hooper, MSW May 20, 2013

Article links to: Mother Jones: Psychiatry’s New Diagnostic Manual: “Don’t Buy It. Don’t Use It. Don’t Teach It.” By Michael Mechanic, May 14, 2013, which I don’t think has been previously posted.


Science Live Chat: Does ‘Psychiatry’s Bible’ Need to Be Rewritten? (Video)

Talk to experts in a live Google Hangout about the controversy over the DSM-5 Emily Underwood, May 20, 2013

With Frank Farley, William Eaton and Allen Frances

Join us on Thursday, 23 May, at 3 p.m. EDT on this page for a live Google Hangout to chat with experts about the fate of the DSM. Be sure to leave your questions for our guests in the comment box below. [See site for more details]


New Internationalist: Corporates cashing in on mental-health diagnosis Adam McGibbon, May 21, 2013


Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Critics blast new manual on mental disorders David Templeton, May 21, 2013

Interview with Brent Dean Robbins, who heads the Psychology Department at Point Park University, is a leading critic of DSM-5 and committee member of the recently launched, Global Summit on Diagnostic Alternatives: An Online Platform for Rethinking Mental Health http://dxsummit.org/


AHRP: Two NIMH Directors Debunk DSM & Deplore Psychiatry’s Unscientific Modus Operandi Vera Sharav, May 8, 2013


San Francisco Weekly: Brain Distrust: Shrinks and Scientologists Find Weird Common Ground Over the DSM-5 Joe Eskenazi, May 22, 2013


Counterpunch, US: Taking on Big Pharma A Mental Health Declaration of Independence Bruce E Levine, May 21, 2013


Economist, US: The DSM-5 Attention, everyone CH, May 22, 2013


New York Times: Mind: The Book Stops Here Richard A Friedman, MD, May 20, 2013


Lexology, US: Employers beware: psychiatry’s latest Diagnostic Manual (DSM-5) creates new mental disorders, expands others, Hunton & Williams LLP, May 20, 2013


Education Week, US: Revised Psychiatric Disorders ‘Bible’ Changes Disability Definitions Christina Samuels on May 20, 2013


Human Resource Executive Online, US: New Mental-Health Manual Likely to Impact HR James J McDonald, Jr., May 22, 2013

Making accommodations for employees with mental disabilities has never been easy, and it’s about to get more difficult with the release of the American Psychiatric Association’s new manual of mental disorders.


Fox News, US: The new DSM-5 fails to accurately describe mental illness Dr Keith Ablow, May 22, 2013


Huffington Post: The Role of Biological Tests in Psychiatric Diagnosis Allen Frances, MD, May 22, 2013


Slate, US: You Do Not Have Asperger’s Amy S F Lutz, May 22, 2013

What psychiatry’s new diagnostic manual means for people on the autism spectrum

For earlier responses to the release of DSM-5 see Posts #254, #253, #252, #251 and #249

Kupfer (APA) statement on National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) announcement

Kupfer (APA) statement on National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) announcement

Post #242 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2VO

David J Kupfer, Chair, DSM-5 Task Force, has issued a statement in response to the April 29 announcement by NIMH’s Thomas Insel:

 Click link for PDF document   American Psychiatric Association Press Release

Text:

For Information Contact:

Eve Herold, 703-907-8640 May 3, 2013

press@psych.org Release No. 13-33

Erin Connors, 703-907-8562

econnors@psych.org

Statement by David Kupfer, MD

Chair of DSM-5 Task Force Discusses Future of Mental Health Research

The promise of the science of mental disorders is great. In the future, we hope to be able to identify disorders using biological and genetic markers that provide precise diagnoses that can be delivered with complete reliability and validity. Yet this promise, which we have anticipated since the 1970s, remains disappointingly distant. We’ve been telling patients for several decades that we are waiting for biomarkers. We’re still waiting. In the absence of such major discoveries, it is clinical experience and evidence, as well as growing empirical research, that have advanced our understanding of disorders such as autism spectrum disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia.

This progress will soon be recognized in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). The new manual, due for release later this month, represents the strongest system currently available for classifying disorders. It reflects the progress that we have made in several important areas.

A revised chapter organization signals how disorders may relate to each other based on underlying vulnerabilities or symptom characteristics.

Disorders are framed in the context of age, gender, and cultural expectations, in addition to being organized along a valuable developmental lifespan within each chapter.

Key disorders were combined or reorganized because the relationships among categories clearly placed them along a single continuum, such as substance use disorder and autism spectrum disorder.

A new section introduces emerging measures, models and cultural guidance to assist clinicians in their evaluation of patients. For the first time, self-assessment tools are included to directly engage patients in their diagnosis and care.

DSM, at its core, is a guidebook to help clinicians describe and diagnose the behaviors and symptoms of their patients. It provides clinicians with a common language to deliver the best patient care possible. And through content such as the new Section III, the next manual also aims to encourage future directions in research.

Efforts like the National Institute of Mental Health’s Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) are vital to the continued progress of our collective understanding of mental disorders. But they cannot serve us in the here and now, and they cannot supplant DSM-5. RDoC is a complementary endeavor to move us forward, and its results may someday culminate in the genetic and neuroscience breakthroughs that will revolutionize our field. In the meantime, should we merely hand patients another promissory note that something may happen sometime? Every day, we are dealing with impairment or tangible suffering, and we must respond. Our patients deserve no less.

The American Psychiatric Association is a national medical specialty society whose physician members specialize in the diagnosis, treatment, prevention and research of mental illnesses, including substance use disorders. Visit the APA at www.psychiatry.org

ENDS

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) to ditch the DSM

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) to ditch the DSM

Post #241 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2UL

An edited version of the post published on May 3

DSM5NIMH to ditch DSM

Earlier this week, in a blog dated April 29, Thomas Insel, National Institute of Mental Health’s Director, quietly drove another nail into the coffin of DSM-5.

NIMH, part funders of the 13 DSM-5 Research Planning Conferences held between 2004 and 2008 and the monographs that resulted out of them, announced that NIMH “will be re-orienting its research away from DSM categories.”

I don’t have figures for how much funding NIMH has sunk into the development of DSM-5.

This announcement comes just three weeks before the American Psychiatric Association launches its next edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, with a clutch of spin off publications scheduled for release in May and September.

APA has yet to issue a statement or comment in the press.

At the end of this post are links to the NIMH Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) posted in 2011, and a commentary by James Phillips, MD, for Psychiatric Times, from April 2011: “DSM-5 and the NIMH Research Domain Criteria Project.”

You can read Thomas Insel’s announcement in full, below, followed by a round up of media coverage.

Additional coverage and commentary is being added, as it comes in, below the NIMH announcement in the pale blue box.

Most recently added: Dr Tad; Neurocritic BlogSpot

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On April 24, in Mental health: On the spectrum, Nature had reported:

Research suggests that mental illnesses lie along a spectrum — but the field’s latest diagnostic manual still splits them apart…

“…The APA claims that the final version of DSM-5 is a significant advance on the previous edition and that it uses a combination of category and dimensional diagnoses. The previously separate categories of substance abuse and substance dependence are merged into the new diagnosis of substance-use disorder. Asperger’s syndrome is bundled together with a handful of related conditions into the new category called autism-spectrum disorder; and OCD, compulsive hair-pulling and other similar disorders are grouped together in an obsessive–compulsive and related disorders category. These last two changes, Regier says, should help research scientists who want to look at links between conditions. “That probably won’t make much difference to treatment but it should facilitate research into common vulnerabilities,” he says.

“The Research Domain Criteria project is the biggest of these research efforts. Last year, the NIMH approved seven studies, worth a combined US$5 million, for inclusion in the project — and, Cuthbert says, the initiative “will represent an increasing proportion of the NIMH’s translational-research portfolio in years to come”. The goal is to find new dimensional variables and assess their clinical value, information that could feed into a future DSM.

“One of the NIMH-funded projects, led by Jerzy Bodurka at the Laureate Institute for Brain Research in Tulsa, Oklahoma, is examining anhedonia, the inability to take pleasure from activities such as exercise, sex or socializing. It is found in many mental illnesses, including depression and schizophrenia.

“Bodurka’s group is studying the idea that dysfunctional brain circuits trigger the release of inflammatory cytokines and that these drive anhedonia by suppressing motivation and pleasure. The scientists plan to probe these links using analyses of gene expression and brain scans. In theory, if this or other mechanisms of anhedonia could be identified, patients could be tested for them and treated, whether they have a DSM diagnosis or not.

“One of the big challenges, Cuthbert says, is to get the drug regulators on board with the idea that the DSM categories are not the only way to prove the efficacy of a medicine. Early talks about the principle have been positive, he says. And there are precedents: “Pain is not a disorder and yet the FDA gives licences for anti-pain drugs,” Cuthbert says.

“Going back to the drawing board makes sense for the scientists, but where does it leave DSM-5? On the question of dimensionality, most outsiders see it as largely the same as DSM-IV. Kupfer and Regier say that much of the work on dimensionality that did not make the final cut is included in the section of the manual intended to provoke further discussion and research. DSM-5 is intended to be a “living document” that can be updated online much more frequently than in the past, Kupfer adds. That’s the reason for the suffix switch from V to 5; what comes out next month is really DSM-5.0. Once the evidence base strengthens, he says, perhaps as a direct result of the NIMH project, dimensional approaches can be included in a DSM-5.1 or DSM-5.2…”

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) announcement

Transforming Diagnosis

By Thomas Insel on April 29, 2013

Thomas R. Insel, M.D., is Director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH).

“…Patients with mental disorders deserve better. NIMH has launched the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) project to transform diagnosis by incorporating genetics, imaging, cognitive science, and other levels of information to lay the foundation for a new classification system…”

“…That is why NIMH will be re-orienting its research away from DSM categories. Going forward, we will be supporting research projects that look across current categories – or sub-divide current categories – to begin to develop a better system….”

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Dr Tad Blog

Paradigms lost: NIMH, McGorry & DSM-5’s failure

Dr Tad | May 4, 2013


Neurocritic Blogspot

RDoC Dimensional Approach for Research vs. DSM-5 for Diagnosis

Neurocritic | May 5, 2013


Article in Romanian

DESCOPERĂ

Cea mai importantă ştiinţă a minţii umane, psihiatria, se transformă în urma unei decizii importante


Article in French

Psychomédia

Le National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) américain se distance du DSM-5 de l’American Psychiatric Association

Soumis par Gestion le 3 mai 2013

“Le National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) américain réoriente ses recherches en se distançant du DSM, le Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, dont la cinquième édition sera lancée par l’American Psychiatric Association le 22 mai, explique son directeur, Thomas Insel, dans un billet publié le 29 avril…”


Article in Turkish

Psikiyatristler DSM tanı kriterlerini terk ediyor!

Dünyadaki en büyük ruh sağlığı araştırma kurumlarından ABD Ulusal Sağlık Kurumu (NIMH), psikiyatrik rahatsızlıkların semptomlara bağlı olarak belirlenmesine dayanan tanı yöntemini terk ediyor.

Pazar, 05 Mayıs 2013


Scientific American John Horgan Blog

Psychiatry in Crisis! Mental Health Director Rejects Psychiatric “Bible” and Replaces With… Nothing

“NIMH director Insel doesn’t mention it, but I bet his DSM decision is related to the big new Brain Initiative, to which Obama has pledged $100 million next year.”

John Horgan | May 4, 2013


Psychology Today
Side Effects | Christopher Lane Ph.D.

The NIMH Withdraws Support for DSM-5
The latest development is a humiliating blow to the APA.

Christopher Lane, Ph.D. | May 4, 2013


Government Health IT

NIMH moving beyond DSM

Anthony Brino, Associate Editor | May 3, 2013


1 Boring Old Man

old news…

1 Boring Old Man | May 3, 2013


Previously posted

Mindhacks blog

National Institute of Mental Health abandoning the DSM

“In a potentially seismic move, the National Institute of Mental Health – the world’s biggest mental health research funder, has announced only two weeks before the launch of the DSM-5 diagnostic manual that it will be “re-orienting its research away from DSM categories”.

In the announcement, NIMH Director Thomas Insel says the DSM lacks validity and that “patients with mental disorders deserve better”.

This is something that will make very uncomfortable reading for the American Psychiatric Association as they trumpet what they claim is the ‘future of psychiatric diagnosis’ only two weeks before it hits the shelves.

As a result the NIMH will now be preferentially funding research that does not stick to DSM categories…”


New Scientist

Psychiatry divided as mental health ‘bible’ denounced

Andy Coghlan and Sara Reardon | May 3, 2013

“The world’s biggest mental health research institute is abandoning the new version of psychiatry’s “bible” – the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, questioning its validity and stating that “patients with mental disorders deserve better”. This bombshell comes just weeks before the publication of the fifth revision of the manual, called DSM-5…”

“…We cannot succeed if we use DSM categories as the gold standard,” says Insel. “That is why NIMH will be reorienting its research away from DSM categories,” says Insel. Prominent psychiatrists contacted by New Scientist broadly support Insel’s bold initiative. However, they say that given the time it will take to realise Insel’s vision, diagnosis and treatment will continue to be based on symptoms.

“Insel is aware that what he is suggesting will take time – probably at least a decade, but sees it as the first step towards delivering the “precision medicine” that he says has transformed cancer diagnosis and treatment. It’s potentially game-changing, but needs to be based on underlying science that is reliable,” says Simon Wessely of the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College London. “It’s for the future, rather than for now, but anything that improves understanding of the etiology and genetics of disease is going to be better [than symptom-based diagnosis].”


New Scientist opinion piece

One manual shouldn’t dictate US mental health research

“The new edition of the DSM “bible” is so flawed that the US National Institute of Mental Health is right to abandon it, says Allen Frances”

Allen Frances, MD | May 3, 2013


@AllenFrancesMD on Twitter

@AllenFrancesMD: @dxrevisionwatch Hype alert. The NIMH dx approach is a necessary, but guarantees nothing in the future and offers nothing in the present.


The Verge

Federal institute for mental health abandons controversial ‘bible’ of psychiatry

Katie Drummond | May 3, 2013

“In a surprising move, the US government institute responsible for overseeing mental health research is distancing itself from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or DSM. The DSM has, for several decades, been perceived as the “bible” that delegates how psychiatric illnesses are defined, diagnosed, and treated.”

“The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) — which funds more research into mental illness than any other agency in the world — this week announced a plan to re-orient its investigations “away from DSM categories.” The move comes mere weeks before the publication of the DSM-5, an update to the manual that’s been mired in controversy because of several contentious changes to existing diagnostic criteria…”


CBS News

National Institute of Mental Health no longer will use DSM diagnoses in studies

Stephanie Pappas | Livescience.com | May 3, 2013


Pharmalive

NIMH Director Says The Bible Of Psychiatry Lacks Validity

Ed Silverman | May 3, 2013


MIT Technology Review

NIMH Will Drop Widely Used Psychiatry Manual

Susan Young | May 3, 2013


Science 2.0

NIMH Delivers A Kill Shot To DSM-5

By Hank Campbell | May 3, 2013


Pacific Standard [Not on NIMH announcement]

Psychiatry’s Contested Bible: How the New DSM Treats Addiction

The 1,000-page psychiatrists’ Big Book will redefine addiction. Critics are already demanding a boycott.

Michael Dhar | May 3, 2013


Drug Rehab [Not on NIMH announcement]

Somatic Symptom Disorder

drugrehab in Mental Health | April 30, 2013

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Related material

DSM-5 and the NIMH Research Domain Criteria Project  Psychiatric Times, James Phillips, MD, April 13, 2011

NIMH Research Domain Criteria (RDoC)  Draft 3.1: June, 2011

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DSM-5 Round up: April #3

Post #240 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2T2

“…Psychiatry has already reached far into our daily lives, and it’s not by virtue of the particulars of any given D.S.M. It’s because the A.P.A., a private guild, one with extensive ties to the drug industry, owns the naming rights to our pain. That so significant a public trust is in private hands, and on such questionable grounds, is what we ought to worry about.”
           The New Yorker, April 9, 2013

The Book of Woe

Gary Greenberg is a Connecticut psychotherapist, author of four books and cultivator of an impressive braid.

Greenberg’s new book The Book of Woe: The DSM and the Unmaking of Psychiatry on the politics and controversies surrounding the making of DSM is published by Blue Rider Press on May 2. Read an excerpt here.

Extracts from “Manufacturing Depression” (Harpers, May 2007), essays, articles and other writings can be read here. Media interviews and podcasts here.

Gary Greenberg blogs here.

Interview with Gary Greenberg:

The Atlantic

The Real Problems With Psychiatry

A psychotherapist contends that the DSM, psychiatry’s “bible” that defines all mental illness, is not scientific but a product of unscrupulous politics and bureaucracy.

“…take the damn thing away from them.”

Hope Reese | May 2, 2013

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DSM-5 Media Round up: April #3

Nature | News Feature

Nature Volume: 496, Pages: 416–418 Date published: (25 April 2013) DOI:doi:10.1038/496416a

Mental health: On the spectrum

Research suggests that mental illnesses lie along a spectrum — but the field’s latest diagnostic manual still splits them apart.

David Adam | April 24, 2013

p. 397 Editorial

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Globe and Mail (Canada)

When did life itself become a treatable mental disorder?

Patricia Pearson | Special to The Globe and Mail | April 27, 2013

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Plos Open Access

Perspective doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1001544

Subgrouping the Autism “Spectrum”: Reflections on DSM-5

Meng-Chuan Lai, Michael V. Lombardo, Bhismadev Chakrabarti, Simon Baron-Cohen

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Monitor on Psychology (Organ of the American Psychological Association)

The Next DSM

A look at the major revisions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, due out next month.

Rebecca A Clay | April 2013

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Psychology Today

Saving Normal

The International Reaction to DSM-5

Allen Frances, MD | April 23, 2013

For WPA/WHO survey of global usage of ICD-10 v DSM-5 see Presentation slides: Slides 17 and 18:
Revising the ICD Definition of Intellectual Disability: Implications and Recommendations March 19, 2013
Data from World Psychiatry. 2011 Jun;10(2):118-31.
The WPA-WHO Global Survey of Psychiatrists’ Attitudes Towards Mental Disorders Classification.
Reed GM, Mendonça Correia J, Esparza P, Saxena S, Maj M. Free full paper

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Huffington Post Allen Frances MD
Allen Frances MD, Professor Emeritus, Duke University | April 21, 2013

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Slide presentation David J Kupfer

Psychiatry Update – American College of Physicians | March 2, 2013

www.acponline.org/about_acp/chapters/va/13mtg/kupfer_psychiatryupdate.pptx

File Format: Microsoft Powerpoint .pptx

(Emerging options for DSM-5 Primary Care Version from Slide 18)

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Psychiatric News | April 19, 2013
Volume 48 Number 8 page 5-5
10.1176/appi.pn.2013.4b14
American Psychiatric Association

Professional News

Gambling Disorder to Be Included in Addictions Chapter

Mark Moran | April 19, 2013

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Full paper PDF:

www.luc.edu/law/media/law/students/publications/llj/pdfs/hass.pdf

Could the American Psychiatric Association Cause You Headaches? The Dangerous Interaction between the DSM-5 and Employment Law

Douglas A. Hass | March 9, 2013

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Scientific American

New DSM-5 Ignores Biology of Mental Illness

The latest edition of psychiatry’s standard guidebook neglects the biology of mental illness. New research may change that

Ferris Jabr | April 2013

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UK Times

First, the good news: you’re not having a nervous breakdown

John Naish | April 16, 2013

Behind a paywall

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DSM-5 Round up: April #2

DSM-5 Round up: April #2

Post #232 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2IU

Update at April 13:

Slate

Abnormal Is the New Normal

Why will half of the U.S. population have a diagnosable mental disorder?

Robin S Rosenberg | April 12, 2013

Via Patrick Landman @landman35635068

News of a forthcoming event about the “medicalization of childhood” and the consequences of DSM-5. The organizers belong to the STOP DSM international movement.

6-8 June, 2013  Palais Rouge, Buenos Aires, Agentina

and

Fundación Sociedades Complejas

La FUNDACION SOCIEDADES COMPLEJAS. PROYECTOS EN SALUD Y EDUCACION se instituye con el objeto de promover el desarrollo, la capacitación, la formación, la investigación y el perfeccionamiento continuo de todos aquellos profesionales de la salud, la educación y la cultura que trabajan con bebes, niñas…

See also guest editorial by Patrick Landman on Side Effects at Psychology Today

Why DSM-5 Concerns European Psychiatrists

A guest contributor from Paris explains why the manual’s power is misplaced

Published on March 18, 2013 by Christopher Lane, Ph.D. in Side Effects

Patrick Landman, Université de Paris VII

http://www.stop-dsm.org

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The New Yorker

The D.S.M. and the Nature of Disease

Gary Greenberg | April 9, 2013

…The D.S.M. has enormous impact on the public health. It determines which conditions insurers will cover, which drugs regulators will approve, which children will receive special-education services, and which criminal defendants will be able to stand trial and, in some cases, how they will be sentenced. Psychiatry has already reached far into our daily lives, and it’s not by virtue of the particulars of any given D.S.M. It’s because the A.P.A., a private guild, one with extensive ties to the drug industry, owns the naming rights to our pain. That so significant a public trust is in private hands, and on such questionable grounds, is what we ought to worry about.

Read more of this post

DSM-5 Round up: April #1

DSM-5 Round up: April #1

Post #231 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2In

New York Post

A disease called ‘childhood’

Do 1 in 5 NYC preteens really suffer a mental woe? A psychiatry expert argues we’re overdiagnosing —and overmedicating — our kids

Allen Frances MD | March 30, 2013

Last week, The Post reported that more than 145,000 city children struggle with mental illness or other emotional problems. That estimate, courtesy of New York’s Health Department, equals an amazing 1 in 5 kids. Could that possibly be true?

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BBC Radio 4

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01rl1q8

Medicalising Grief

Will the book that classifies mental illness lead to the medicalisation of grief?

Presented by Matthew Hill. Featuring Drs Jerome Wakefield, Lisa Cosgrove, Allen Frances (Chaired the Task Force for DSM-IV), Joanne Cacciatore and Gary Greenberg.

Available to listen again for the next 7 days online.

Counseling Today ACA podcasts help counselors prepare for DSM-5

Heather Rudow | March 27, 2013

Rebecca Daniel-Burke, ACA’s [American Counseling Association]director of professional projects and staff liaison to ACA’s DSM-5 Task Force, hosts the podcast series, which offers counselors a way to prepare for and understand potential changes. Daniel-Burke spoke with K. Dayle Jones for the first, 38-minute podcast, and Jason King for the second, which is 52 minutes long and available for CE credit…

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The New York Times invited readers to respond for a dialogue about psychiatric diagnoses and the forthcoming DSM-5. The dialogue was initiated by a letter from Ronald Pies, which concludes “‘Diagnosis’ means knowing the difference between one condition and another. For many patients, learning the name of their disorder may relieve years of anxious uncertainty. So long as diagnosis is carried out carefully and respectfully, it may be eminently humanizing. Indeed, diagnosis remains the gateway to psychiatry’s pre-eminent goal of relieving the patient’s suffering.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/20/opinion/invitation-to-a-dialogue-psychiatric-diagnoses.html

Ronald Pies

Controversy surrounding the soon-to-be-released fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or DSM-5 — often called “psychiatry’s bible” — has cast a harsh light on psychiatric diagnosis. For psychiatry’s more radical critics, psychiatric diagnoses are merely “myths” or “socially constructed labels.” But even many who accept the reality of, say, major depression argue that current psychiatric diagnoses often “stigmatize” or “dehumanize” people struggling with ordinary grief, stress or anxiety…

Published responses:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/24/opinion/sunday/sunday-dialogue-defining-mental-illness.html

Letters
Sunday Dialogue: Defining Mental Illness

Response to Letters from Ronald Pies via Psychiatric Times

http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/blog/pies/content/article/10168/2135248

Diagnosis and its Discontents: The DSM Debate Continues

Ronald W. Pies, MD | 29 March 2013

Dr Pies is Editor-in-Chief Emeritus of Psychiatric Times, and a professor in the psychiatry departments of SUNY Upstate Medical University and Tufts University School of Medicine. He is the author of The Judaic Foundations of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy; a collection of short stories, Ziprin’s Ghost; and, most recently, a poetry chapbook, The Heart Broken Open. His most recent book is The Three-Petalled Rose: How the Synthesis of Judaism, Buddhism, and Stoicism Can Create a Healthy, Fulfilled and Flourishing Life (iUniverse: 2013).

“As to diseases, make a habit of two things—to help, or at least to do no harm.”
–Hippocrates, Epidemics, in Hippocrates, trans. W. H. S. Jones (1923), Vol. I, 165 [italics added]

“An agnostic is someone who doesn’t know, and di- is a Greek prefix meaning “two.” So “diagnostic” means someone who doesn’t know twice as much as an agnostic doesn’t know.”
–Walt Kelly, Pogo

A funny thing happened to me on the way to the New York Times “Sunday Dialogue” —I made myself unclear.¹ This is not supposed to happen to careful writers, or to those of us who flatter ourselves with that honorific. So what went wrong?

In brief, I greatly underestimated the public’s strong identification of psychiatric diagnosis with the categorical approach of the recent DSMs. But whereas my letter to the Times was indeed occasioned by DSM-5’s release in May, my argument in defense of psychiatric diagnosis was not a testimonial in favor of any one type of diagnostic scheme—categorical, dimensional, prototypical² or otherwise…

http://www.meactionuk.org.uk/The-Achilles-Heel.htm

Stephen Ralph | March 30, 2013

In recent years I have been considering the reliability of the whole “CFS/ME” diagnostic process.

From personal experience I have encountered numerous doctors who failed to possess the detailed specialist knowledge they needed to make a diagnosis of Behçet’s disease at both GP and specialist level.

From personal experience I have learned that standard blood tests or even CT/MRI scans or indeed other diagnostic tests such as endoscopy can and do fail to detect a complex clinical disease present in a patient.

I have no doubt that there is a diagnostic black hole between the insufficient knowledge of the doctor and pathologies that are not detectable by the basic tests they choose to request which produce negative results they then choose to rely on.

The diagnoses of “CFS/ME” and now Somatic Symptom Disorder have in my view been deployed by liaison psychiatry to exploit that black hole.

Read more of this post

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