DSM-5 released: Media, professional and advocacy reaction: Round up #5

Post #255 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-346

For earlier responses to the release of DSM-5 see Posts #254, #253, #252, #251 and #249

Division of Clinical Psychology

Earlier this month, the Division of Clinical Psychology (DCP), a division of the British Psychological Society, published a Position Statement on the “Classification of Behaviour and Experience in Relation to Functional Psychiatric Diagnoses, Time for a Paradigm Shift.”

Lucy Johnstone, who helped formulate the DCP’s Position Statement, contributed to a BBC Radio 3 broadcast, last night.

BBC Radio 3

Duration: 45 minutes | One year left to listen | First broadcast: Wednesday 22 May 2013

Night Waves May 22, 2013

Segment starts at 23:45 mins in and runs for 15 mins

Khaled Hosseini, Man Booker International Prize, Disgraced, the Future of Psychiatry, with Rana Mitter

“The British Psychological Society’s division of clinical psychology is calling for a ‘paradigm shift’ in psychiatry away from diagnosis. They claim treating ‘mental distress’ as an illness stigmatises sufferers and leads us to ignore more complicated social dimensions to conditions like depression or schizophrenia. So what is the way forward for psychiatry? Rana is joined by Lucy Johnstone who helped formulate the BPS’s position, consultant psychiatrist Tom Burns, and the historian of psychiatry Matthew Smith.”


Critical Psychiatry Network

The Critical Psychiatry Network (CPN) has issued a statement on DSM-5, dated May 22, 2013. The Statement can be downloaded from this page or the PDF opened, here, on Dx Revision Watch: CPN statement on DSM-5


Social Justice Solutions

“Is a social worker conceived and operated organization born out of the Stony Brook School of Social Welfare’s commitment to active participation in creating a socially just world.”

In DSM-5: A Call to Opposition for Social Workers, Georgianna Dolan-Reilly, LMSW, calls on the organization’s constituency to oppose DSM-5sign the Open Letter developed by the Society for Humanistic Psychology, Division 32 of the American Psychological Association, and criticizes the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) for not issuing its position on DSM-5.


Social Work Helper

Follow Up Interview with Dr Allen Frances: Dishing the Dirt on the DSM 5 Deona Hooper, MSW May 20, 2013

Article links to: Mother Jones: Psychiatry’s New Diagnostic Manual: “Don’t Buy It. Don’t Use It. Don’t Teach It.” By Michael Mechanic, May 14, 2013, which I don’t think has been previously posted.


Science Live Chat: Does ‘Psychiatry’s Bible’ Need to Be Rewritten? (Video)

Talk to experts in a live Google Hangout about the controversy over the DSM-5 Emily Underwood, May 20, 2013

With Frank Farley, William Eaton and Allen Frances

Join us on Thursday, 23 May, at 3 p.m. EDT on this page for a live Google Hangout to chat with experts about the fate of the DSM. Be sure to leave your questions for our guests in the comment box below. [See site for more details]


New Internationalist: Corporates cashing in on mental-health diagnosis Adam McGibbon, May 21, 2013


Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Critics blast new manual on mental disorders David Templeton, May 21, 2013

Interview with Brent Dean Robbins, who heads the Psychology Department at Point Park University, is a leading critic of DSM-5 and committee member of the recently launched, Global Summit on Diagnostic Alternatives: An Online Platform for Rethinking Mental Health http://dxsummit.org/


AHRP: Two NIMH Directors Debunk DSM & Deplore Psychiatry’s Unscientific Modus Operandi Vera Sharav, May 8, 2013


San Francisco Weekly: Brain Distrust: Shrinks and Scientologists Find Weird Common Ground Over the DSM-5 Joe Eskenazi, May 22, 2013


Counterpunch, US: Taking on Big Pharma A Mental Health Declaration of Independence Bruce E Levine, May 21, 2013


Economist, US: The DSM-5 Attention, everyone CH, May 22, 2013


New York Times: Mind: The Book Stops Here Richard A Friedman, MD, May 20, 2013


Lexology, US: Employers beware: psychiatry’s latest Diagnostic Manual (DSM-5) creates new mental disorders, expands others, Hunton & Williams LLP, May 20, 2013


Education Week, US: Revised Psychiatric Disorders ‘Bible’ Changes Disability Definitions Christina Samuels on May 20, 2013


Human Resource Executive Online, US: New Mental-Health Manual Likely to Impact HR James J McDonald, Jr., May 22, 2013

Making accommodations for employees with mental disabilities has never been easy, and it’s about to get more difficult with the release of the American Psychiatric Association’s new manual of mental disorders.


Fox News, US: The new DSM-5 fails to accurately describe mental illness Dr Keith Ablow, May 22, 2013


Huffington Post: The Role of Biological Tests in Psychiatric Diagnosis Allen Frances, MD, May 22, 2013


Slate, US: You Do Not Have Asperger’s Amy S F Lutz, May 22, 2013

What psychiatry’s new diagnostic manual means for people on the autism spectrum

For earlier responses to the release of DSM-5 see Posts #254, #253, #252, #251 and #249

DSM-5 released: Media, professional and advocacy reaction: Round up #3

Post #253 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-332

For earlier responses to release of DSM-5 see Posts #252, #251 and #249

The Conversation

Two visions for understanding illness: DSM and the International Classification of Diseases
James Bradley, Lecturer in History of Medicine/Life Science at University of Melbourne, May 22, 2013

DSM-5 tells us more about psychiatry than psychiatrists
Prof, Sir Simon Wessely, Professor of Psychological Medicine at King’s College London, May 20, 2013

Under new psychiatric guidebook we might all be labelled mad
Allen Frances, Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry at Duke University, May 20, 2013

Explainer: What is the DSM?
Peter Kinderman, Professor of Clinical Psychology at University of Liverpool, May 20, 2013

Mental disorders: debunking some myths of the DSM-5
Perminder Sachdev, Scientia Professor of Neuropsychiatry, Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing (CHeBA), School of Psychiatry at University of New South Wales, April 18, 2013

Five new mental disorders you could have under DSM-5, May 20, 2013
Authors: Christopher Fairburn, Professor of Psychiatry at University of Oxford; Christopher Lane, Professor of English at Northwestern University; David Mataix-Cols, Professor and Honorary Consultant Clinical Psychologist at King’s College London; Jon Grant; Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience at University of Chicago; Karen M. von Deneen, Associate Professor at Xidian University

+++
The Dana Foundation: Psychiatric Drug Development: Diagnosing a Crisis Steven E Hyman, MD, April 02, 2013

Steven E Hyman, MD, resigned from the DSM-5 Task Force in 2012. Dr Hyman remains listed as Chair of the APA-WHO International Advisory Group for the Revision of ICD-10 Mental and Behavioural Disorders

Update: Commentary by Bernard Carroll at Health Care Renewal, April 6, 2013


Blogs Psych Central: Video NIMH’s Thomas Insel on a New Understanding of the Brain Sandra Kiume, April 2013

Video: 13:04 mins

NIMH’s Thomas Insel on a New Understanding of the Brain By Sandra Kiume

Director of the National Institute for Mental Health Thomas Insel gives a TED Talk on the new domain criteria research direction, and how an important first step is to reframe mental illness as brain disorders.

By doing so, diverse fields like psychology, cognitive science, molecular neuroscience, genetics, psychiatry, and more can work together toward a new understanding of the mind.


NIMH: Mental Disorders as Brain Disorders: Thomas Insel at TEDxCaltech, April 23, 2013

Video 15:05 mins


Psycritic: What If the NIMH Succeeds? What Then? May 11, 2013

A child psychiatrist takes a critical look at psychiatry, the news, culture, etc


Jonathan Turley: From DSM-I to DSM-5 in the Legal System: Mental Illness Issues in the Courtroom Charlton Stanley (Otteray Scribe), guest blogger, May 19


Canada.com: Infighting, boycotts, resignations: Psychiatry faces another crisis of confidence Sharon Kirkey, Postmedia News, May 17

Includes Allen Frances video


Radio New Zealand: New reference manual issued by Psychiatric Assn May 19


Healio Psychiatric Annals: APA President-Elect: ‘Our time is now’ May 19


Los Angeles Times Review of Books: Andrew Scull on The Book of Woe: The DSM and the Unmaking of Psychiatry and Hippocrates Cried : The Decline of American Psychiatry Andrew Scull, May 19

Delusions of Progress: Psychiatry’s Diagnostic Manual

Essay length article that includes reference to the legal threats issued on behalf of American Psychiatric Publishing against Dx Revision Watch site, in December 2011.


Truth Dig: British Psychologists Find Fault With DSM-V Alexander Reed Kelly, May 16

England’s Division of Clinical Psychology, which represents more than 10,000 practitioners, has criticized the latest edition of the field’s leading diagnostic manual for its categorizing of normal behaviors—such as shyness in children and depression after the death of a loved one—as medical problems treatable with drugs…


New York Post: We’re all mad here, New psychiatry manual turns ordinary American life into mental disorders Allen Frances, MD, May 18

Millions of people who went to sleep last night thinking they were normal woke up this morning with a new mental disorder…


Medscape Medical News, Psychiatry: Use DSM-5 ‘Cautiously, If at All,’ DSM-IV Chair Advises Pam Harrison, May 17

“I believe that the American Psychiatric Association (APA)’s financial conflict of interest, generated by DSM publishing profits needed to fill its budget deficit, led to premature publication of an incompletely tested and poorly edited product,” Dr. Frances states.

“The problems associated with the DSM-5 prove that the APA should no longer hold a monopoly on psychiatric diagnosis…. The codes needed for reimbursement are available for free on the Internet.”


Spiked Online, UK: Our brains aren’t moulded by abuse Ken McLaughlin. May 16

So, is mental distress caused by faulty genes or by past experiences of childhood abuse? Maybe it’s neither.


For earlier responses to release of DSM-5 see Posts #252, #251 and #249

DSM-5 released: Media, professional and advocacy reaction: Round up #2

Post #252 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-32B

For earlier responses to release of DSM-5 see Posts #251 and #249


Medpage Today, US: APA Leaders Defend New Diagnostic Guide John Gever, Deputy Managing Editor,  May 18

…DSM-5 is now on sale for $199 in hardcover and $149 in paperback. The APA has never made the DSM freely available (it is an important source of revenue) and no change in that policy is planned…A digital version is promised within a few months through a secure website and also as mobile device applications. Revisions will be more frequent and most likely would be distributed only electronically, Kupfer said.


Wall Street Journal, US: Revised Psychiatric Manual Faces Mixed Reviews Shirley Wang, May 18

The widely criticized new version of the U.S. psychiatric diagnostic manual due out faces a potentially diminished role in research, which would mark a shift for what has been considered the bible of American psychiatry for 30 years.

…Dr. Kupfer, the DSM leader, said researchers should look at the DSM as “a guide but not necessarily the only framework they should use to carry out basic science.”

“For the DSM to be considered primarily a guide for clinicians is a “dramatic backtracking from their prior position as putting themselves out there as the best basis for research,” said Geoffrey Reed, senior project officer at the World Health Organization…Most of the research funded by the NIMH and published in psychiatry journals in the past 20-plus years had to use DSM diagnostic criteria; otherwise, scientists had no hope of publishing, said Dr. Reed.


The Guardian, UK: New US manual for diagnosing mental disorders published Ian Sample, science correspondent, May 18

The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or DSM-5, has divided medical opinion

[Ed: Note according to a WPA-WHO 2011 Survey, around 11% of practising UK psychiatrists and around 23% of practising psychiatrists surveyed globally reported using DSM-IV more than ICD-10.]

…Though not used in the UK, where doctors turn to the World Health Organisation’s International Statistical Classification of Diseases (ICD), the US manual has global influence. It defines groups of patients, and introduces new names for disorders. Those names can spread, and become the norm elsewhere. More importantly, the categories redefine the populations that are targeted by drugs companies.


The Pharmaletter, US: Europe adopting US strategies to diagnose and treat ADHD Industry article, May 16

…Although Europe trails behind the USA in terms of market revenue, ADHD therapeutics markets are expected to show strong growth, with Spain predicted to witness a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 8% over 2012-2018, beating the USA’s CAGR of 6% during the same future period. European markets have not yet neared the saturation point that ADHD therapeutics are facing in the USA, and there is an optimistic view for ambitious growth in this region.


Medpage Today, US: DSM-IV Boss Presses Attack on New Revision John Gever, Deputy Managing Editor, May 17

Includes Complimentary Source PDF: http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleid=1688399

…Ironically, DSM-5 has come under attack from the autism community for rewriting the autism spectrum classification in ways that autism advocates have feared will disqualify many children from receiving autism diagnoses — a controversy that Frances did not address…But he did suggest that the DSM in general has become too important after a very modest beginning in the 1950s.

“The DSM … has since acquired perhaps too much real-world influence as the arbiter of who gets what treatment and whether it will be reimbursed; who is eligible for disability benefits, Veterans Affairs benefits, and school and mental health services; and who qualifies to receive life insurance, adopt a child, fly an airplane, or buy a gun,” Frances observed.


Biomedcentral: Patient advocacy and dsm-5 Dan J Stein and Katharine A Phillips, May 17

BMC Medicine 2013, 11:133 doi:10.1186/1741-7015-11-133

Published: 17 May 2013 Abstract (provisional). Complete article is available as free, provisional PDF here

Abstract (provisional)

The revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) provides a useful opportunity to revisit debates about the nature of psychiatric classification. An important debate concerns the involvement of mental health consumers in revisions of the classification. One perspective argues that psychiatric classification is a scientific process undertaken by scientific experts and that including consumers in the revision process is merely pandering to political correctness. A contrasting perspective is that psychiatric classification is a process driven by a range of different values and that the involvement of patients and patient advocates would enhance this process. Here we draw on our experiences with input from the public during the deliberations of the Obsessive Compulsive-Spectrum Disorders subworkgroup of DSM-5, to help make the argument that psychiatric classification does require reasoned debate on a range of different facts and values, and that it is appropriate for scientist experts to review their nosological recommendations in the light of rigorous consideration of patient experience and feedback.


Herald Online, PR Newswire: New Social Media Campaign Features Stories Of Individuals Who Rejected Psychiatric Association’s DSM-5

Campaign timed to coincide with rollout of American Psychiatric Association’s DSM-5, Open Paradigm Project

SAN FRANCISCO, May 18, 2013 — /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — The Open Paradigm Project, in collaboration with MadinAmerica.com, Occupy Psychiatry, and leading organizations in the movement to reform mental health care, announces a social media campaign showcasing video testimonials by individuals negatively impacted by the traditional psychiatric model, which focuses on pathology and illness rather than wellness and recovery. The launch coincides with the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA) rollout of its latest revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), taking place at the APA’s annual meeting in San Francisco this weekend. In light of National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) director Thomas Insel’s move away from the DSM (“lack of validity… patients deserve better”) and DSM-5 task force chair David Kupfer’s admission of an absence of biological markers of mental illness (“we’re still waiting”), these stories starkly unveil the failure of, and harm done by, the prevailing model of mental health care…


Vox, Gibraltar: Western Psychiatry in Crisis Vox Editor, May 17

DSM 5 and exclusively biological psychiatry must be completely rethought

The following is an extract of the Mental Health Europe article:

Western psychiatry is in crisis. The direction taken by the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM 5), due to be published later this week, has received ample criticism. Moreover, in disagreement with the American Psychiatric Association, the United States National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), the world’s largest research institute, has announced they will no longer fund projects based exclusively on DSM categories. Unfortunately, while Mental Health Europe considers the NIMH decision to be the right one, by focusing almost entirely on neuroscience and on so-called disorders of the brain, the NIMH is missing out on the critical importance of user experiences to psychiatric research and to the practice of psychiatry…

…For more information, please contact MHE Information and Communications Manager Silvana Enculescu at silvana.enculescu@mhe-sme.org. MHE Senior Policy Adviser Bob Grove and MHE Policy Officer Yves Brand will be available for interviews.

    Click link for PDF document   More harm than good – DSM 5 and exclusively biological psychiatry must be completely rethought


BBC: Mental health ‘bible’ update due May 18


Psych Central, US: DSM-5 Released: The Big Changes John M Grohol, Psy.D., May 18


Wired Science, US: A Case That Tells the Weird Tale of DSM – and Other Recommended Reading David Dobbs, May 18

For a single post that shows how weirdly and unevenly psychiatric diagnosis actually works (and fails to work) in this country, and what that means for the new DSM, get over to Maia Svalavitz’s clear-eyed account of her own five diagnoses (and the one she never got)…


Independent, UK: Comment: Despite what the DSM implies, medical intervention is not always the answer to mental health issues Frank Furedi, May 18

You don’t need to be a mental health professional to take an interest in the recently published fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders

…Recently, the British Psychological Society’s division of clinical psychology has attacked the psychiatric profession for offering a biomedical model for understanding mental distress. But its criticism was not directed at the ethos of medicalisation as such, but only at the tendency to associate mental illness with biological causes. What it offered was an alternative model of medicalisation – one where mental illness was represented as the outcome of social and psychological cause. It seems that medicalization has become so deeply entrenched that even critics of the DSM accept its premise.


OUP Blog (Oxford University Press): Clinician’s guide to DSM-5 Joel Paris, MD, May 18

…The DSM system can be described as flawed but necessary. Clinicians need to communicate to each other, and even a wrong diagnosis allows them to do so.


For earlier responses to release of DSM-5 see Posts #251 and #249

DSM-5 released: Media, professional and advocacy reaction: Round up #1

Post #251 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-32h

Eureka Alert: American Psychiatric Association Press Release: American Psychiatric Association releases DSM-5 May 17


Science Media Centre, UK: Press briefing: Has psychiatry gone too far? May 17

Speakers:

Prof Elizabeth Kuipers, Professor of Clinical Psychology, Head of Department of Psychology, King’s College London’s Institute of Psychiatry;
Prof David Clark, Professor of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford and Honorary Fellow of the British Psychological Society;
Prof Nick Craddock, Professor of Psychiatry, University of Cardiff and Director of the National Centre for Mental Health, Wales;
Prof David Taylor, Royal Pharmaceutical Society expert and spokesperson on mental health medicines and Editor of the Maudsley Prescribing Guidelines;
Andy Bell, Deputy Chief Executive, The Centre for Mental Health


Medscape Medical News from The American Psychiatric Association’s 2013 Annual Meeting: DSM-5: Setting the Record Straight Jeffrey A Lieberman, MD

…The NIMH’s position on the DSM and need for scientific progress in understanding the genetic and neurobiologic basis of mental disorders has not changed. The DSM is an essential guide to clinicians to facilitate accurate diagnosis and treatment. At the same time, biomedical research cannot be confined by traditional diagnostic constructs and their boundaries. Tom and I, and the APA and NIMH, are in complete agreement on this. The DSM is a valuable guide that helps clinicians in the evaluation of patients to establish an accurate diagnosis and facilitate the most effective treatment. It is designed to reflect the latest scientific knowledge and translate this into a “user-friendly” instrument for clinicians and patients…


Medscape Medical News from The American Psychiatric Association’s 2013 Annual Meeting: DSM-5 Officially Launched, But Controversy Persists Caroline Cassels, May 18

…diagnostic categories represented in the DSM-IV and the International Classification of Diseases-10 (ICD-10, containing virtually identical disorder codes) remain the contemporary consensus standard for how mental disorders are diagnosed and treated.


American Psychological Association: Practice Central Update: Nine frequently asked questions about DSM-5 and ICD-10-CM Practice Research and Policy staff, May 16

APA Practice staff answer questions about billing, determining diagnoses and more related to the two diagnostic classification systems.


Market Place, Health Care, US: How much is the DSM-5 worth? Dan Gorenstein, May 17

It’s 19 years old and it still brings in about $4-5 million a year…with 150,000 pre-orders the DSM-5 is a hot seller. We may do a second printing more quickly than we originally thought,” says Scully. At $199 dollars for the hardcover, $149 for paperback — that’s more than $20 million in sales right there.


BBC Radio 5 live: Friday 10:00, 120 mins

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01sf42v

One of the country’s leading psychologists tells this programme that the way mental health conditions are diagnosed in the UK is “deeply flawed” and too many people are being labelled with specific syndromes like post traumatic stress disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and personality disorders. Dr Lucy Johnstone, from the division of clinical psychology, says we shouldn’t be labelling behaviour as illnesses when in most cases people are just reacting in understandable ways to life experiences. Victoria speaks to Dr Johnstone and to listeners who have been diagnosed with mental health problems.

Clip 14:52: Are we too quick to diagnose mental health illnesses?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0195g8k


RCPSYCH, UK: Troubled waters Blog of the President of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, Prof Sue Bailey


The Monthly, Australia: DSM-5 and the Mental Illness Make-over Prof Nick Haslam, May 2013


ABC News, Australia: Psychiatry bible receives a makeover Sophie Scott, Michelle Brown, Gillian Bennett, May 19


Daily Telegraph, Australia: New psychiatry manual, DSM5, reclassifies previously normal behaviours as illnesses Sue Dunlevy, May 18


Toronto Star, Canada: DSM-5: Controversial changes to psychiatry’s bible Nancy White, May 17


El Confidential, Madrid: El DSM-5, la nueva biblia de los psiquiatras, atacada por los psicólogos May 14

Sinc habla en exclusive con David J. Kupfer


Psychiatric News, US: Ink Meets Paper as DSM-5 Goes to Press Aaron Levin, May 17


Slate, US: The DSM-5 Is Not Crazy, Psychiatry’s new diagnoses of picking, bingeing, and tantrums sound silly, but they’re useful for me and my patients, Marla W Deibler, May 17


Ottowa Citizen, Canada: Infighting, boycotts, resignations: Psychiatry faces another crisis of confidence Sharon Kirkey, Postmedia News, May 17


Independent, UK: Doctors in dispute: What exactly is normal human behaviour? Jeremy Laurance, May 17


Japan Times: Psychiatrists under fire in mental health battle Jamie Doward, May 18


Reuters: Psychiatrists unveil their long-awaited diagnostic “bible” Sharon Begley, May 17

The medicalisation of childhood: Time for a paradigm shift: BPS Manchester event

Post #251  Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-327

British Psychological Society (BPS) Division of Educational & Child Psychology one-day event

The medicalisation of childhood: Time for a paradigm shift

Friday 28 June 2013 | Manchester United Football Club, Old Trafford, Manchester 

Keynote speakers: Prof Allen Frances, Dr Joanna Moncrieff, Prof Peter Kinderman, Dr Peter Tyrer

Expert Panel: Dave Traxon, Vivian Hill, Brian Apter, Prof Sami Timimi

Click link for PDF document  Educational & Child Psychology Manchester event Flyer

BPSManchester

The medicalisation of childhood: Time for a paradigm shift: BPS House of Commons event

Post #250 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-31Q

British Psychological Society (BPS) Division of Educational & Child Psychology Debate

The medicalization of childhood: Time for a paradigm shift

11 June 2013 2–5pm | Committee Room 12 | House of Commons | John McDonnell, MP

Expert Panel: Prof Allen Frances, Prof Peter Tyrer, Prof Simon Wessely, Prof Peter Kinderman, Vivian Hill

Click link for PDF document   Division of Educational & Child Psychology Flyer
BPSHoC

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