DSM-5 Round up: January #1

DSM-5 Round up: January #1

Post #218 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2Bs

American Journal of Psychiatry

Editorials | January 01, 2013

The Initial Field Trials of DSM-5: New Blooms and Old Thorns

Robert Freedman, M.D.; David A. Lewis, M.D.; Robert Michels, M.D.; Daniel S. Pine, M.D.; Susan K. Schultz, M.D.; Carol A. Tamminga, M.D.; Glen O. Gabbard, M.D.; Susan Shur-Fen Gau, M.D., Ph.D.; Daniel C. Javitt, M.D., Ph.D.; Maria A. Oquendo, M.D., Ph.D.; Patrick E. Shrout, Ph.D.; Eduard Vieta, M.D., Ph.D.; Joel Yager, M.D.

Am J Psychiatry 2013;170:1-5. 10.1176/appi.ajp.2012.12091189

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Copyright © 2013 by the American Psychiatric Association

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“A rose is a rose is a rose” (1). For psychiatric diagnosis, we still interpret this line as Robins and Guze did for their Research Diagnostic Criteria—that reliability is the first test of validity for diagnosis (2). To develop an evidence-based psychiatry, the Robins and Guze strategy (i.e., empirically validated criteria for the recognizable signs and symptoms of illness) was adopted by DSM-III and DSM-IV. The initial reliability results from the DSM-5 Field Trials are now reported in three articles in this issue (3–5). As for all previous DSM editions, the methods used to assess reliability reflect current standards for psychiatric investigation (3). Independent interviews by two different clinicians trained in the diagnoses, each prompted by a computerized checklist, assessment of agreement across different academic centers, and a pre-established statistical plan are now employed for the first time in the DSM Field Trials. As for most new endeavors, the end results are mixed, with both positive and disappointing findings…

Full free text

Washington Post

Antidepressants to treat grief? Psychiatry panelists with ties to drug industry say yes

Peter Whoriskey | December 27, 2012

It was a simple experiment in healing the bereaved: Twenty-two patients who had recently lost a spouse were given a widely used antidepressant.

The drug, marketed as Wellbutrin, improved “major depressive symptoms occurring shortly after the loss of a loved one,” the report in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry concluded.

When, though, should the bereaved be medicated? For years, the official handbook of psychiatry, issued by the American Psychiatric Association, advised against diagnosing major depression when the distress is “better accounted for by bereavement.” Such grief, experts said, was better left to nature.

But that may be changing…

Medscape Medical News > Psychiatry

APA Answers Criticism of Pharma-Influenced Bias in DSM-5

Deborah Brauser | January 4, 2013

The American Psychiatric Association (APA) has fired back a strong response to a recent article by the Washington Post questioning the possibility of pharmaceutical industry influence on decisions regarding the upcoming fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5)…

Ed: Note for watchers of DSM-5’s Timeline. Although the Timeline has the final texts schedule for submission to the publishers by December 2012, in his commentary below, Dr Frances discloses that DSM-5 will go to press at the end of January. The new edition of DSM is slated for release at the APA’s 166th Annual Meeting, May 18-22, 2013, San Francisco.

Psychology Today

DSM5 in Distress
The DSM’s impact on mental health practice and research
by Allen Frances, M.D.

Last Plea to DSM 5: Save Grief From the Drug Companies
Let us respect the dignity of love and loss.

Allen J. Frances, M.D. | January 3, 2013

Psychiatric News
Psychiatric News | January 04, 2013
Volume 48 Number 1 page 7-7
10.1176/appi.pn.2013.1a14
American Psychiatric Association
Professional News

Eating-Disorders Guideline Still Current and Valid, Panel Finds

Mark Moran | January 4, 2013

A review of the 2006 APA practice guideline on eating disorders finds that it is substantially current and is not affected by changes in diagnostic criteria in DSM-5.

Huffington Post

‘Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified’: What’s Changing With EDNOS In DSM-5?

Catherine Pearson | January 4, 2013

It took Autumn Whitefield-Madrano more than 20 years to seek treatment for her eating disorder. The writer was 9 when she started having symptoms, primarily binging, and 33 when she finally got help. When she did, the diagnosis surprised her. Whitefield-Madrano had EDNOS, or an “Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified…”

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