DSM-5 released: professional and campaigning reaction: Round up #7

Post #262 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-3cF

DSM-5 released: professional and campaigning reaction: Round up #7

A considerable amount of media coverage and commentary on DSM-5 has been published since posting Round up #6, on May 24. Occupied with other matters, I shall likely not catch-up. The world will continue to turn.

Here, though, are some recent commentaries from psychiatry and psychology professionals; a report from Prof Sir Simon Wessely on last week’s Institute of Psychiatry’s two day DSM-5 Conference; below that, new Online Assessment Measures documents from the APA’s DSM-5 Resource pages, including Somatic Symptom assessment instruments for 6-17 year olds, and a clarification from CMS on HIPAA and the status of the DSM-5 code sets.

Via Patrick Landman

Pédopsychiatre, Psychiatre, Président d’Initiative Pour une Clinique du Sujet Stop-Dsm, Psychanalyste Membre d’Espace Analytiquea

A statement written and signed by prominent French psychiatrists in response to recent comments by APA President-Elect, Jeffrey Lieberman, was issued, yesterday:

Full text on the STOP-DSM campaign website:

To oppose the DSM-5 is not to oppose psychiatry

Recently, some of the DSM-5 supporters have been trying to portray the opposition against the fifth edition of this manual of the American Psychiatric Association as an opposition to psychiatry and a form of antipsychiatry. This political argument aims to discredit the movement and to subsume it in its entirety, including its numerous variations, under a single label, one that can easily be identified and connected with a certain history, the sixties. Such specious rhetoric allows its authors not to have to respond to serious and well-documented arguments of the DSM-5 critics. In reality, its many opponents from Europe, Australia, South America and even the United States include a great number of psychiatrists, clinical psychologists, social workers and other mental health practitioners… Read on


Report on the website of South London and Maudsely NHS Foundation Trust from Prof Sir Simon Wessely on the Institute of Psychiatry’s recent DSM-5 Conference.

Prof Wessely is Head of the Department of Psychological Medicine and Vice Dean, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London. 

DSM-5 at the IoP

Monday June 10, 2013

The latest and fifth version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association (APA), invariably known as the DSM, was published on 18 May 2013. To mark the occasion, we hosted an international conference at the Institute of Psychiatry from 3-4 June. This was the first such meeting since the launch and the first platform for Professor David Kupfer, Chair of Psychiatry at the Western Psychiatric Institute in Pittsburgh, but more importantly for us, the man who has directed the compilation and development of DSM-5, and who is justly regarded as its architect…

…I used the somatoform disorders as an example of where “DSM feared to tread”. The latest attempt to come up with something that is both empirically rigorous but also suitable for real world use in this particular area represents a small step forward, at least in simplifying an area of previous mind numbing complexity, but I suggested, was unlikely to represent real progress. This is because the DSM (and for that matter the ICD) are both diagnostic systems that are written by psychiatrists but which in this area need to be used by physicians, who ignore them, and concern patients who don’t like them, often fiercely so… Full Text


Essay by Sarah Kamens MA on the Dx Summit platform

DSM-5′s Somatic Symptom Disorder: From Medical Enigma to Psychiatric Sphinx

Sarah Kamens is a Ph.D. candidate in clinical psychology at Fordham University and in media & communications at the European Graduate School (EGS). Her work focuses on diagnostic discourse and sociopolitics in the psy disciplines.


Spiked Review of Books

‘This manual is, frankly, a disaster for children’

Christopher Lane talks to spiked about the new edition of the bible of psychiatry – ‘a legal document facilitating the medication of millions’.

by Helene Guldberg


http://www.psychiatry.org/dsm5

DSM-5 Online Assessment Measures

APA is inviting clinicians and researchers to provide feedback on the instruments’ usefulness in characterizing patient status and improving patient care. There are a large number of documents that can be downloaded from the link above, including:

For Adults

LEVEL 2–Somatic Symptom–Adult (Patient Health Questionnaire 15 Somatic Symptom Severity Scale [PHQ-15])

For Parents of Children Ages 6–17

LEVEL 2—Somatic Symptom—Parent/Guardian of Child Age 6-17 (Patient Health Questionnaire 15 Somatic Symptom Severity Scale [PHQ-15])

For Children Ages 11–17

LEVEL 2—Somatic Symptom—Parent/Guardian of Child Age 11-17 (Patient Health Questionnaire 15 Somatic Symptom Severity Scale [PHQ-15])

Clinician-Rated

Clinician-Rated Severity of Somatic Symptom Disorder


Finally, a note on the FAQ pages of the CMS.gov website which clarifies the non official status of DSM-5 code sets:

Frequently Asked Questions

(FAQ1817)

[Q] In current practice by the mental health field, many clinicians use the DSM-IV in diagnosing mental disorders. As of May 19, 2013, the DSM-5 was released. Can these clinicians continue current practice and use the DSM-IV and DSM-5 diagnostic criteria?

[A] Yes. The Introductory material to the DSM-IV and DSM-5 code set indicates that the DSM-IV and DSM-5 are “compatible” with the ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes. The updated DSM-5 codes are crosswalked to both ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM. As of October 1, 2014, the ICD-10-CM code set is the HIPAA adopted standard and required for reporting diagnosis for dates of service on and after October 1, 2014.

Neither the DSM-IV nor DSM-5 is a HIPAA adopted code set and may not be used in HIPAA standard transactions. It is expected that clinicians may continue to base their diagnostic decisions on the DSM-IV/DSM-5 criteria, and, if so, to crosswalk those decisions to the appropriate ICD-9-CM and, as of October 1, 2014, ICD-10 CM codes. In addition, it is still perfectly permissible for providers and others to use the DSM-IV and DSM-5 codes, descriptors and diagnostic criteria for other purposes, including medical records, quality assessment, medical review, consultation and patient communications.

Dates when the DSM-IV may no longer be used by mental health providers will be determined by the maintainer of the DSM-IV/DSM-5 code set, the American Psychiatric Association, http://www.dsm5.org

(FAQ1817)

DSM-5 released: Media, professional and advocacy reaction: Round up #6

Post #256 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-34A

For earlier responses to the release of DSM-5 see Round up Posts #255, #254, #253, #252, #251 and #249

On May 16, CDC published a new report on children’s mental health which I am including in this DSM-5 round up.

Washington Post: CDC says 20 percent of U.S. children have mental health disorders Tony Pugh, May 19, 2013

Up to one in five American youngsters — about 7 million to 12 million, by one estimate — experience a mental health disorder each year, according to a new report billed as the first comprehensive look at the mental health status of children in the country.

CDC article on new Report released May 16, 2013 can be accessed here:

http://www.cdc.gov/features/childrensmentalhealth/

Report in text format here: Children’s Mental Health – New Report

Report in PDF format here: PDF Children’s Mental Health – New Report

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Thompson Reuters News & Insight: Lawyers worry new measure of mental retardation could prompt more executions Elizabeth Dilts, May 13, 2013


Lexology, US: “DSM-5 anxiety” may be new disorder for employers trying to navigate ADA Squire Sanders, Ryan A. Sobel, May 22, 2013


Pacific Standard, US: Now That the ‘DSM-5′ Is Out Can We Start Talking About the Effect It Will Have? Michael Dahr, May 23, 2013

The newly revised, hotly contested book of psychiatric diagnoses is finally here. How will it change the way we consider and treat substance use problems?

Michael Dahr is a medical and science writer who has written for Livescience.com, Science & Medicine, Iowa Outdoors, and various medical and research institutions.

The Conversation: DSM-5 won’t increase mental health work claims – here’s why Nick Glozier, May 23, 2013

Professor of Psychological Medicine, BMRI & Discipline of Psychiatry at University of Sydney


Times Higher Education: Psychiatry’s cause for anxiety Matthew Reisz, May 23, 2013

Focus on people, not technology or the DSM, to treat mental illness, Tom Burns tells Matthew Reisz


Telegraph, UK: Why are women still considered more insane than men? Will Nicholl, May, 23, 2013


ABC Australia: The Pulse DSM-5: why all the fuss? Claudine Ryan, May 23, 2013

…Dr Maria Tomasic, president of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists, says the DSM-5 is a useful tool designed to be used by medical professionals who understand its limitations. “We are concerned about the use of classification systems such as the DSM-5 by institutions such as courts or government bodies who often do not understand the complexity of diagnosis, and seek to simplify difficult decisions about funding or eligibility…”

[Professor Perminder] Sachdev says “it should not be used as a legal document or to help bench-mark social services and welfare payments, nor is it suitable for use in seven-minute consultations in a GPs office”.


Wood TV, US: Shrinks, critics face off over psychiatric manual Associated Press Medical Writer Lindsey Tanner, May 22, 2013


The Take Away, US: Presenter John Hockenberry

The show is a co-production of WNYC Radio and Public Radio International, in collaboration with New York Times Radio and WGBH Boston.

Listen again The DSM and Mental Health in America, May 22, 2013

Guest: Allen Frances, MD | Produced by: Nikolay Nikolov and Jillian Weinberger

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Listen again In Defense of the DSM-5 May 23, 2013

Guest: Jeffrey Lieberman, MD | Produced by: Kristen Meinzer

…the incoming president of the American Psychiatry Association, which revises the DSM, says the criticism is unwarranted. His name is Jeffrey Lieberman, MD, and he’s also chairman of psychiatry at Columbia University.

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From Dx Summit platform

Counselors for Social Justice Position Statement on DSM-5 (first published August, 2011)

For earlier responses to the release of DSM-5 see Posts #255, #254, #253, #252, #251 and #249