DSM-5 Round up: May #1

Post #245 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2WM

More reports on last week’s announcement by NIMH Director, Thomas Insel

BMJ News [Full report behind paywall]

Director of top research organization for mental health criticizes DSM for lack of validity

BMJ 2013; 346 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.f2954 (Published 8 May 2013)

Michael McCarthy, Seattle | May 8, 2013


New Scientist print edition No 2196 May 11, 2013

[The first of these two print edition articles is behind a subscription]

How a scientific DSM will transform psychiatry

Peter Aldhous, Andy Coghlan, additional reporting by Sara Reardon

This article appears in the print edition THIS WEEK section under the headline

A revolution in mental health, Patients deserve better than an unscientific manual, says leading health institute

…don’t expect the landscape of mental illness to change any time soon. Insel accepts that it will take at least a decade to conduct the research necessary to devise a new approach to diagnosis. In the meantime, patients’ illnesses will continue to be diagnosed using the DSM’s symptom-based categories…

…Even the transition in research will be gradual – the NIMH isn’t going to stop funding projects based around DSM diagnoses overnight. But it is clear that new approaches will get priority in future, and with a budget of almost $1.5 billion per year, the NIMH is in a position to call the shots…

This week’s Editorial in the print edition is an edited version of the Allen Frances opinion piece published by New Scientist earlier this week:

Print edition Editorial > Opinion

Don’t count on this manual, The future of psychiatric research lies in simpler questions, by Allen Frances


UK Independent

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders has been updated but should we beware this manual’s diagnosis?

The book which gives doctors a checklist for mental illnesses – as made famous by The Psychopath Test – has been updated. But does it really work?

…An alternative – and free – publication, International Statistical Classification of Diseases (ICD), issued by the World Health Organisation, provides an official international classification system of mental illness that the DSM sometimes borrows. The ICD is used in Europe for clinical treatment in preference to the DSM and without the lurid headlines. The DSM, though, is increasingly influential on our way of thinking about mental health…

Mark Piesing | May 8, 2013

Comment to article from Dx Revision Watch


For global usage of DSM v ICD by practising psychiatrists and country by country breakdown see
Slide 17 Global use of DSM-5 and ICD-10; Slide 18 Use by country breakdown http://www.aaidd.org/media/3192013.pdf
Data from The WPA-WHO Global Survey of Psychiatrists’ Attitudes Towards Mental Disorders Classification Free full paper

UK Radio

BBC R4 Today programme

Discussion on DSM-5 | Today programme, Thurs, May 9

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01s8qx7/Today_09_05_2013/

1 hr.50 mins in from start |  7 minutes

With James Davies, Lecturer and author of “Cracked” (has also had two articles around his book published in the Times)

Does your child really have a behavioural problem? James Davies, May 6 2013

and Prof Nick Craddock

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BBC R4 All in the Mind [One year left to listen again]

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p018qfjm

Presenter Claudia Hammond

The new edition of the American Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders will be launched later this month, Professor Simon Wessely discusses its potential impact in the UK.

Duration: 9 mins at start of 28 min broadcast| Tuesday 07 May 2013 21:00 | Repeated Wed 8 May 2013 15:30

Discussion omitted any reference to, and implications for the WHO/APA International Advisory Group for the Revision of ICD-10 Mental and Behavioural Disorders commitment to strive as far as possible for harmonization between the mental health chapter of the forthcoming ICD-11 (Chapter 5) and DSM-5.

The Scientist

NIMH to Steer Away from New Manual

The agency will no longer use the newly revised guide to mental disorders to categorize its funding priorities.

Kate Yandell | May 9, 2013

…To better classify mental disease, the NIMH has started the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) project, which Insel said will “transform diagnosis by incorporating genetics, imaging, cognitive science, and other levels of information to lay the foundation for a new classification system.” However, biological biomarkers for mental disease are few, so Insel said that RDoC is more of a framework for future knowledge to fit into than a completed classification system…

…In order to better fill in the gaps, he said that NIMH grant applicants will be asked to think of research projects that cut across diagnoses…

…NIMH is not “ditching” the DSM completely, Insel told Time. DSM diagnostic criteria will continue to be important in the clinic, just not as guides for research.


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Not specific to recent announcement by NIMH’s, Thomas Insel

Huffington Post [Also at Psychiatric Times, Psychology Today]

Hippocratic Humility in the Face of ‘Unexplained’ Medical Problems

Allen Frances, MD | May 7, 2013

With contribution from Dr Diane O’Leary


National Pain Report

Could Fibromyalgia Be Labeled as a Psychiatric Illness?

Celeste Cooper, RN | May 5, 2013

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Related material

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) announcement Transforming Diagnosis
Published by Thomas Insel, Director, NIMH, April 29, 2013

Full text of rebuttal statement from David J Kupfer, Chair, DSM-5 Task Force, press released by APA on May 6, 2013
Dx Revision Watch Post #242: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2VO

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DSM-5 and the NIMH Research Domain Criteria Project Psychiatric Times, James Phillips, MD, April 13, 2011

NIMH Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) Draft 3.1: June, 2011

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International media Round up #1: National Institute of Mental Health to re-orientate research away from DSM categories

International media Round up #1: National Institute of Mental Health to re-orientate research away from DSM categories

Post #243 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2VZ

Update: Additional media coverage on NIMH added (Matthew Herper, Forbes; Deborah Brauser, Medscape Medical News; Ferris Jabr, Scientific America; John M Grohol, PsychCentral; TIME; 1 Boring Old Man), plus details of DSM-5 on BBC R4 radio

BBC R4’s All in the Mind this evening will be discussing the impact of the DSM on UK mental health and asking whether or not we in the UK pay any attention to what it contains. No other details about whom Claudia Hammond will be interviewing:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01s8cpf

BBC Radio 4 | Duration: 28 minutes | Tuesday 07 May 2013 21:00 | Wed 8 May 2013 15:30


Yesterday, American Psychiatric Association press released a rebuttal from DSM-5 Task Force Chair, David J Kupfer, to the announcement, last week, that the world’s largest federal mental health funding agency will be re-orientating research away from DSM categories.

Read Kupfer’s statement here:

Statement, David Kupfer, MD, May 3, 2013 [press@psych.org Release No. 13-33]

Chair of DSM-5 Task Force Discusses Future of Mental Health Research

Click link for PDF document American Psychiatric Association Press Release

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The story is trickling into mainstream media and being picked up internationally. For earlier media and blogger coverage, see Dx Revision Watch post: National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) to ditch the DSM (May 3).

There has been mixed reaction to this announcement by NIMH’s Director, Thomas Insel, with many welcoming a shift from DSM dominance but scepticism, also, over whether NIMH might realistically achieve its objectives, as set out a couple of years ago.

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Media Round up #1


Forbes

Pharma & Healthcare

Why Psychiatry’s Seismic Shift Will Happen Slowly

Matthew Herper Forbes Staff | May 8, 2013

…I called the NIMH, and was put on the phone with Bruce Cuthbert, the director of the division of adult translational research. I had a pretty simple question. If the NIMH were really rejecting or abandoning the DSM, that would mean the agency wouldn’t accept studies that use DSM-5 criteria. For instance, if you wanted to test a new schizophrenia drug in schizophrenics, you’d have to find some new RDoC way of describing the disease.

Cuthbert said repeatedly that would not be the case. It’s not so much that studies that use the DSM-5 will be excluded and abandoned, but that researchers would now be allowed to apply for grants that would not use the manual’s diagnostic criteria, or subdivided them in new, creative ways…


Medscape Medical News > Psychiatry

NIMH, APA Clash Over Upcoming DSM-5

‘Patients Deserve Better,’ NIMH Director Says

Deborah Brauser | May 7, 2013


Scientific America

No One Is Abandoning the DSM, But It Is Almost Time to Transform It

Ferris Jabr | May 7, 2013


PsychCentral

Did the NIMH Withdraw Support for the DSM-5? No

John M. Grohol, Psy.D. | May 7, 2013

…Will this replace the DSM-5? No, because as Dr. Insel notes, “This is a decade-long project that is just beginning.” If the NIMH effort ever replaces the DSM, it will be a long time from now…

“I also should point out that these comments reflect [only] our translational research portfolios. Our Division of Services and Intervention Research mostly supports research conducted in clinical settings that is relevant to current clinical practice and services delivery. Thus, […] grants in these areas will continue to be predominantly funded with DSM categories for some time.” [according to Dr. Bruce Cuthbert, director of the Division of Adult Translational Research at the National Institute of Mental Health]


1 Boring Old Man

…groundhog day

1 Boring Old Man | May 7, 2013


TIME

Mental Illness

Mental Health Researchers Reject Psychiatry’s New Diagnostic ‘Bible’

Maia Szalavitz | May 7, 2013

Just weeks before psychiatry’s new diagnostic “bible”—the DSM 5— is set to be released, the world’s major funder of mental health research has announced that it will not use the new diagnostic system to guide its scientific program, a change some observers have called “a cataclysm” and “potentially seismic.” Dr. Thomas Insel, the director of the National Institute on Mental Health, said in a blog post last week that “NIMH will be re-orienting its research away from DSM categories.”

The change will not immediately affect patients. But in the long run, it could completely redefine mental health conditions and developmental disorders. All of the current categories — from autism to schizophrenia — could be replaced by genetic, biochemical or brain-network labeled classifications. Psychiatrists, who are already reeling from the conflict-filled birth of the fifth edition of the Diagnostical and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, are feeling whipsawed…

…The NIMH has outlined a new diagnostic system — called Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) — that could ultimately replace the DSM, but it’s not yet ready for prime time. For the time being, NIMH and the psychiatrists who use the manual will continue to abide by existing classifications for diagnosing patients and getting treatment reimbursed. “Some people have the idea that we’re trying to ditch or diss the DSM and that’s not a fair assessment,” says Insel…


New York Times

Psychiatry’s Guide Is Out of Touch With Science, Experts Say

Pam Belluck and Benedict Carey | May 6, 2013

…“As long as the research community takes the D.S.M. to be a bible, we’ll never make progress,” Dr. Insel said, adding, “People think that everything has to match D.S.M. criteria, but you know what? Biology never read that book.”

…Dr. Insel said in the interview that his motivation was not to disparage the D.S.M. as a clinical tool, but to encourage researchers and especially outside reviewers who screen proposals for financing from his agency to disregard its categories and investigate the biological underpinnings of disorders instead. He said he had heard from scientists whose proposals to study processes common to depression, schizophrenia and psychosis were rejected by grant reviewers because they cut across D.S.M. disease categories.

“They didn’t get it,” Dr. Insel said of the reviewers. “What we’re trying to do with RDoC is say actually this is a fresh way to think about it.”

He added that he hoped researchers would also participate in projects funded through the Obama administration’s new brain initiative.

Dr. Michael First, a psychiatry professor at Columbia who edited the last edition of the manual, said, “RDoC is clearly the way of the future,” although it would take years to get results that could apply to patients. In the meantime, he said, “RDoC can’t do what the D.S.M. does. The D.S.M. is what clinicians use. Patients will always come into offices with symptoms.”

For at least a decade, Dr. First and others said, patients will continue to be diagnosed with D.S.M. categories as a guide, and insurance companies will reimburse with such diagnoses in mind…


Science Insider

NIMH Won’t Follow Psychiatry ‘Bible’ Anymore

Emily Underwood | May 6, 2013

…Helena Kraemer, a biostatistician at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, who was responsible for field trials of diagnostic categories proposed for DSM-5, says that Insel is right that the NIMH’s new program, called Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) is “the direction we have to go.” However, she says, “he’s wrong in saying that DSM-5 is to be set aside.” When it comes to validity, there now is no gold standard, she says. “The DSM is a series of successive approximations.” Kraemer’s vision is that future versions of the manual will not have to wait 10 to 15 years for revision, but incorporate new scientific data from RDoC as it emerges. She says that a meeting is scheduled in June to discuss the possibility of converting the DSM into an electronic document that could incorporate those changes. “Everybody I’ve talked to about it thinks that’s a good idea.”

…Implementing RDoC will present some practical challenges, [William] Carpenter acknowledges. “This does shift the paradigm.” Rather than excluding all study subjects who do not fit a DSM diagnosis, such as major depression, for example, the new approach might include a range of participants with different diagnoses who all demonstrate anhedonia, the impaired ability to experience pleasure, and might look for underlying brain abnormalities that they share in common. “I bet that the rough spots are overcome pretty quickly,” Carpenter says, “but of course we have to see how well that actually works out…”


The Globe and Mail [Canada]

American Psychiatric Association rebuked over new diagnostic manual

Wency Leung | May 6, 2013

…[Gary] Greenberg says that while he believes that this change in the institute’s research direction will generate a huge amount of science on mental health, he is skeptical that researchers will be able to boil down the extraordinarily complex workings of the brain into sound and specific diagnostic criteria.

In response to Insel, the APA issued a statement on Saturday by David Kupfer, chair of the DSM-5 task force, noting that it has been waiting for decades for reliable biological and genetic markers on which to base precise diagnoses. “We are still waiting,” Kupfer said.

In the meantime, the DSM is the “strongest system currently available for classifying disorders,” he said.

“Efforts like the National Institute of Mental Health’s Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) are vital to the continued progress of our collective understanding of mental disorders,” Kupfer said. “But they cannot serve us in the here and now, and they cannot supplant DSM-5…”


Psychology Today Blog Mood Swings

NIMH: A Requiem for DSM – and its Critics
A new generation will reject DSM, and the anti-biological critics of DSM too

Dr. Nassir Ghaemi in Mood Swings | May 5, 2013

Update: Response from Gary Greenberg and further comment from Bernard Carroll, MD


Wetenschap 24 News [Netherlands]

Psychiaters verwerpen psychiatriebijbel

Door: Nadine Böke | mei 03, 2013

De grootste onderzoeksinstelling voor geestelijke gezondheidszorg ter wereld, het Amerikaanse NIMH (National Institute for Mental Health) verwerpt ‘psychiatriebijbel’ DSM.


LaPresse [French Canadian]

Le blogue santé

DSM-5: une bible controversée

Valérie Simard | 6 mai 2013


Agence Science-Presse [French Canadian]

Recherche: désaveu de la bible des psychiatres

Agence Science-Presse |  le 6 mai 2013

(Agence Science-Presse) L’ouvrage qu’on décrit sans cesse comme la «bible» des maladies mentales, et dont la nouvelle édition, après des années d’attente, doit paraître ce mois-ci, vient d’être écarté par rien de moins que le plus gros organisme subventionnaire de la recherche sur les maladies mentales au monde.


De Morgen [Belgium]

Something rotten in de psychiatrie

OPINIE − 07/05/13

De labelingmachine van de DSM 5 is mensonwaardig.
Wat doet de overheid, vraagt Marc Calmeyn. Calmeyn is psychiater en psychoanalyticus. Hij werkt in Brugge.


For earlier media and blogger coverage, see Dx Revision Watch post: National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) to ditch the DSM.

DSM-5 Round up: April #3

Post #240 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2T2

“…Psychiatry has already reached far into our daily lives, and it’s not by virtue of the particulars of any given D.S.M. It’s because the A.P.A., a private guild, one with extensive ties to the drug industry, owns the naming rights to our pain. That so significant a public trust is in private hands, and on such questionable grounds, is what we ought to worry about.”
           The New Yorker, April 9, 2013

The Book of Woe

Gary Greenberg is a Connecticut psychotherapist, author of four books and cultivator of an impressive braid.

Greenberg’s new book The Book of Woe: The DSM and the Unmaking of Psychiatry on the politics and controversies surrounding the making of DSM is published by Blue Rider Press on May 2. Read an excerpt here.

Extracts from “Manufacturing Depression” (Harpers, May 2007), essays, articles and other writings can be read here. Media interviews and podcasts here.

Gary Greenberg blogs here.

Interview with Gary Greenberg:

The Atlantic

The Real Problems With Psychiatry

A psychotherapist contends that the DSM, psychiatry’s “bible” that defines all mental illness, is not scientific but a product of unscrupulous politics and bureaucracy.

“…take the damn thing away from them.”

Hope Reese | May 2, 2013

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DSM-5 Media Round up: April #3

Nature | News Feature

Nature Volume: 496, Pages: 416–418 Date published: (25 April 2013) DOI:doi:10.1038/496416a

Mental health: On the spectrum

Research suggests that mental illnesses lie along a spectrum — but the field’s latest diagnostic manual still splits them apart.

David Adam | April 24, 2013

p. 397 Editorial

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Globe and Mail (Canada)

When did life itself become a treatable mental disorder?

Patricia Pearson | Special to The Globe and Mail | April 27, 2013

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Plos Open Access

Perspective doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1001544

Subgrouping the Autism “Spectrum”: Reflections on DSM-5

Meng-Chuan Lai, Michael V. Lombardo, Bhismadev Chakrabarti, Simon Baron-Cohen

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Monitor on Psychology (Organ of the American Psychological Association)

The Next DSM

A look at the major revisions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, due out next month.

Rebecca A Clay | April 2013

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Psychology Today

Saving Normal

The International Reaction to DSM-5

Allen Frances, MD | April 23, 2013

For WPA/WHO survey of global usage of ICD-10 v DSM-5 see Presentation slides: Slides 17 and 18:
Revising the ICD Definition of Intellectual Disability: Implications and Recommendations March 19, 2013
Data from World Psychiatry. 2011 Jun;10(2):118-31.
The WPA-WHO Global Survey of Psychiatrists’ Attitudes Towards Mental Disorders Classification.
Reed GM, Mendonça Correia J, Esparza P, Saxena S, Maj M. Free full paper

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Huffington Post Allen Frances MD
Allen Frances MD, Professor Emeritus, Duke University | April 21, 2013

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Slide presentation David J Kupfer

Psychiatry Update – American College of Physicians | March 2, 2013

www.acponline.org/about_acp/chapters/va/13mtg/kupfer_psychiatryupdate.pptx

File Format: Microsoft Powerpoint .pptx

(Emerging options for DSM-5 Primary Care Version from Slide 18)

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Psychiatric News | April 19, 2013
Volume 48 Number 8 page 5-5
10.1176/appi.pn.2013.4b14
American Psychiatric Association

Professional News

Gambling Disorder to Be Included in Addictions Chapter

Mark Moran | April 19, 2013

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Full paper PDF:

www.luc.edu/law/media/law/students/publications/llj/pdfs/hass.pdf

Could the American Psychiatric Association Cause You Headaches? The Dangerous Interaction between the DSM-5 and Employment Law

Douglas A. Hass | March 9, 2013

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Scientific American

New DSM-5 Ignores Biology of Mental Illness

The latest edition of psychiatry’s standard guidebook neglects the biology of mental illness. New research may change that

Ferris Jabr | April 2013

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UK Times

First, the good news: you’re not having a nervous breakdown

John Naish | April 16, 2013

Behind a paywall

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DSM-5 publication date May 22: American Psychiatric Association to release DSM-5 between May 18-22, San Francisco

Post #235 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2Lq

DSM-5 publication date May 22: American Psychiatric Association to release DSM-5 between May 18-22, San Francisco

After 14 years and with a staggering $25 million thrown at it, the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) will be launched during the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA) Annual Meeting in San Francisco, May 18-22, 2013.

The Bumper Book of Head Stuff has cost $25,000 a page.

“…ignore DSM 5. It is not official. It is not well done. It is not safe. Don’t buy it. Don’t use it. Don’t teach it.”

Commentary: “Does DSM 5 Have a Captive Audience?” Saving Normal, Allen Frances, MD

Further revisions and refinements to the criteria sets and disorder descriptions, following closure of the third and final stakeholder review and comment period (June 15, 2012) and the finalizing of texts in December and January, are embargoed and won’t be evident until the manual is released, next month.

Draft proposals, as they had stood on the DSM-5 Development site for the third stakeholder review, were removed from the APA’s website last November. Additional pages archiving draft proposals for DSM-5 Development internal use which remained publicly accessible were put behind a webmaster log in, around mid March.

(No drafts of the expanded texts that accompany the disorder sections and categories have been available for public scrutiny at any stage in the drafting process.)

The official publication date for DSM-5 is May 22 for the U.S. (May 31 for UK). The manual is 1000 pages and costs nearly $200 for the hardcover edition. An electronic version of the DSM-5 is understood to be in development for later this year.

According to this December 1 interview with Task Force Chair, David J Kupfer, MD, for the Washingtonian,

…While it will likely be some time before we can expect a DSM-6, it may only be a few years until a DSM-5.1 or -5.2, thanks to the expected digital version of the manual. “We don’t wait to wait another 19 to 20 years to have a new revision of the whole volume,” says Kupfer. “But if there is some unexpected consequence, which we can’t anticipate, we have an opportunity to fix something two to three years from now.”

A DSM-5 Table of Contents listing the new disorder sections and category names for DSM-5 (but not the criteria sets) can be accessed on this APA page.

Also at that URL – fact sheets, articles and videos for selected categories, which are being added to every few weeks (including justifications for some of the more controversial changes and new inclusions), and the following documents relating to the overall development process:

Insurance Implications of DSM-5 (New document)
Highlights of Changes from DSM-IV-TR to DSM-5 (updated April 5, 2013)
From Planning to Publication: Developing DSM-5
The Organization of DSM-5
The People Behind DSM-5

A number of books are publishing around the DSM-5 this April and May:

The Intelligent Clinician’s Guide to the DSM-5® by Joel Paris (Apr 17, 2013)

The Book of Woe: The DSM and the Unmaking of Psychiatry by Gary Greenberg  (May 2, 2013) (also available as an Audio Book and Audio CD)

Saving Normal: An Insider’s Revolt Against Out-of-Control Psychiatric Diagnosis, DSM-5, Big Pharma, and the Medicalization of Ordinary Life by Allen Frances (May 14, 2013)

Essentials of Psychiatric Diagnosis: Responding to the Challenge of DSM-5 by Allen Frances MD (May 17, 2013)

Making the DSM-5: Concepts and Controversies by Joel Paris and James Phillips (May 31, 2013)

Recent press releases

December 1, 2012: APA Release No. 12-43 American Psychiatric Association Board of Trustees Approves DSM-5 (includes Attachment A: Select Decisions Made by APA Board of Trustees)

January 18, 2013: APA Release No. 13-06 DSM-5 Now Available for Preorder

February 28, 2013:  APA Release No. 13-11 APA Annual Meeting in San Francisco, May 18-22; DSM-5 to be Released

April 9, 2013: APA Release No. 13-19 APA 2013 Annual Meeting Special Track to Present DSM-5 Changes

DSM and DSM-5 are registered trademarks of the American Psychiatric Association.

DSM-5 Round up: April #2

DSM-5 Round up: April #2

Post #232 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2IU

Update at April 13:

Slate

Abnormal Is the New Normal

Why will half of the U.S. population have a diagnosable mental disorder?

Robin S Rosenberg | April 12, 2013

Via Patrick Landman @landman35635068

News of a forthcoming event about the “medicalization of childhood” and the consequences of DSM-5. The organizers belong to the STOP DSM international movement.

6-8 June, 2013  Palais Rouge, Buenos Aires, Agentina

and

Fundación Sociedades Complejas

La FUNDACION SOCIEDADES COMPLEJAS. PROYECTOS EN SALUD Y EDUCACION se instituye con el objeto de promover el desarrollo, la capacitación, la formación, la investigación y el perfeccionamiento continuo de todos aquellos profesionales de la salud, la educación y la cultura que trabajan con bebes, niñas…

See also guest editorial by Patrick Landman on Side Effects at Psychology Today

Why DSM-5 Concerns European Psychiatrists

A guest contributor from Paris explains why the manual’s power is misplaced

Published on March 18, 2013 by Christopher Lane, Ph.D. in Side Effects

Patrick Landman, Université de Paris VII

http://www.stop-dsm.org

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The New Yorker

The D.S.M. and the Nature of Disease

Gary Greenberg | April 9, 2013

…The D.S.M. has enormous impact on the public health. It determines which conditions insurers will cover, which drugs regulators will approve, which children will receive special-education services, and which criminal defendants will be able to stand trial and, in some cases, how they will be sentenced. Psychiatry has already reached far into our daily lives, and it’s not by virtue of the particulars of any given D.S.M. It’s because the A.P.A., a private guild, one with extensive ties to the drug industry, owns the naming rights to our pain. That so significant a public trust is in private hands, and on such questionable grounds, is what we ought to worry about.

Read more of this post

DSM-5 Round up: February #1

DSM-5 Round up: February #1

Post #225 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2F7

Update: More recent coverage:

The first in a series of three commentaries by Allen Frances, MD, on the Somatic Symptoms Disorder issue has received over 25,000 page views on Psychology Today, alone. It was also published at Huffington Post and on “Education Update,” and now also at Psychiatric Times.

Mislabeling Medical Illness As Mental Disorder

Allen Frances, MD | February 13, 2013

Fox Health News

A psychiatrist’s take on the DSM-5 Somatic Symptom Disorder diagnosis, Dr Keith Ablow, for Fox News Health:

Does somatic symptom disorder really exist?

Keith Ablow, MD |  for Fox News Health | February 14, 2013

Currents An interactive newsletter of NASW-WA

(Washington State Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers is a membership organization.)

DSM 5 Changes

DSM-5: A Summary of Proposed Changes

Carlton E. Munson, PhD, LCSW-C | February 12, 2013

The Health Care Blog

Mislabeling Medical Illness

Allen Frances, MD | February 12, 2013

Huffington Post Blogger

Bruce E. Levine
Practicing clinical psychologist, writer

DSM-5: Science or Dogma? Even Some Establishment Psychiatrists Embarrassed by Newest Diagnostic Bible

Bruce E. Levine | February 10, 2013

Earlier coverage:

Huffington Post

DSM-5: Science or Dogma? Even Some Establishment Psychiatrists Embarrassed by Newest Diagnostic Bible

Bruce E. Levine | February 10, 2013

Practicing clinical psychologist, writer

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DIE WELT/Worldcrunch All news is global

Translated (and possibly abridged) from original article in German

Worldcrunch All news is global

Psychiatrists Not Crazy About The Revised Manual Of Mental Disorders

Fanny Jiménez and Christiane Löll | February 5, 2013

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Allen Frances, MD, now blogs at Saving Normal.

Archive posts at DSM 5 in Distress will remain accessible and open for new comments.

Saving Normal
Mental health and what is normal.
by Allen Frances, M.D.

DSM 5 Boycotts and Petitions
Too many, too sectarian

Allen Frances, MD | February 8, 2013

There are already about a dozen different DSM 5 petitions and boycotts out there. This is completely understandable – there is lots in DSM 5 to be angry at or frightened about.

Unfortunately, though, this is not a case of more the merrier. Fragmentation into a number of small protests will greatly reduce their aggregate impact…

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David J. Kupfer, MD, chairs the DSM-5 Task Force. On February 8, Dr Kupfer published in defence of the SSD construct on Huffington Post. Part Three in the Allen Frances and Suzy Chapman series of commentaries on the SSD criteria was published earlier, last week, Saving Normal on Psychology Today:

Huffington Post

David J. Kupfer, M.D.
Chair, DSM-5 Task Force

Somatic Symptoms Criteria in DSM-5 Improve Diagnosis, Care

David J. Kupfer, MD | February 8, 2013

While the goal of the upcoming fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) is clear, accurate criteria for diagnosing mental disorders, the motivation behind the book’s revision was the improvement of diagnosis and clinical care. Somatoform disorders are one area where definitive progress was made.

Somatoform disorders are characterized by symptoms suggesting physical illness or injury, but which may not be fully explained by a general medical condition, another mental disorder, or by medication or substance side effects. The symptoms are either very distressing or result in significant disruption of an individual’s ability to function in daily life. People suffering from somatoform disorders are often initially seen in general medical settings as opposed to psychiatric settings…

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This new post from Christopher Lane on the DSM-5 ‘Somatic Symptom Disorder’ controversy has been designated a Psychology Today “Essential Read” editor pick:

Side Effects
From quirky to serious, trends in psychology and psychiatry
by Christopher Lane, Ph.D.

DSM-5 Has Gone to Press Containing a Major Scientific Gaffe
The APA declined to correct the error, despite multiple warnings.

Christopher Lane, PhD | February 8, 2013

When DSM-5 is published three months from now, in the middle of May, it will contain at least one major scientific gaffe. The Trustees of the American Psychiatric Association voted to include a definition of Somatic Symptom Disorder (SSD) so broad and over-inclusive that it is certain to include medical patients with an outsized concern about their health, as well as those who are merely vigilant in trying to maintain it…

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Lightweight feature in UK Times Magazine, Saturday, February 9, 2013:

The Asperger’s effect

Louise Carpenter | February 9 2013

Once it was a taboo. Now, in Silicon Valley, it’s almost a job qualification. So has the diagnosis lost its stigma, wonders Louise Carpenter…

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Article on mental health diagnosis and DSM-5 co-authored by Dr Raj Persaud, Consultant Psychiatrist, and Professor Sir Simon Wessely, Professor of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London.

http://www.simonwessely.com/dsm5.html

DSM-5 and the future of psychiatry
Did 2012 prove that psychiatric disease doesn’t exist?

From doctors.net.uk 1.2.2013

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At the end of this article is a link to a forthcoming CPD Certified conference at the Wolfson Lecture Theatre, Institute of Psychiatry, June 4-5, 2013:

Conference:

DSM-5 and the Future of Psychiatric Diagnosis: Where is the roadmap taking us?

A two day international conference following the publication of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) will take place at the Institute of Psychiatry on the 4th and 5th of June 2013.

Mental health practitioners and researchers around the world anticipate the DSM-5 that is due to published by the American Psychiatric Association within the first few months of 2013.

Discussions about the DSM-5 have stretched well beyond the world of academic psychiatry having become a matter of intense public interest and media coverage.

The aim of this conference is to have a rigorous and comprehensive discussion of the clinical, research, and public health implications of the DSM-5. The perspective is international and speakers will include top scientists, key policy makers, patient representatives, and front-line clinicians.

Speakers include:

Professor David Kupfer, Head of DSM-5 Planning Committee and Professor at the University of Pittsburgh

Professor William Carpenter, DSM-5 Task Force Member and Professor at the University of Maryland

Professor David Clark, Professor of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford

Dr Clare Gerada, General Practitioner and Chair of the Council of the Royal College of General Practitioners

Professor Catherine Lord, Director of the Center for Autism and the Developing Brain and Professor at the University of Michigan

Professor Vikram Patel, Professor of International Mental Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Professor Nikolas Rose, Head of the Department of Social Science, Health and Medicine, Kings College London

Sir Michael Rutter, First Professor of child psychiatry in the UK and Professor of Developmental Psychopathology at Kings College London

Professor Norman Sartorius, Former director of the World Health Organization’s Division of Mental Health, and a former president of the World Psychiatric Association

Price: £350 (including lunches and an evening reception)

Dates:

* Tuesday 4th June | 09:45- 17:30 (evening reception to follow)

* Wednesday 5th June | 09:45 – 17:15

Venue: Wolfson Lecture Theatre, Institute of Psychiatry

This event is CPD Certified