Somatic Symptom Disorder in recent journal papers

Post #261 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-3ah

Somatic Symptom Disorder in recent journal papers

Somatic Symptom Disorder is also included in Saving Normal: An Insider’s Revolt Against Out-Of-Control Psychiatric Diagnosis, Dsm-5, Big Pharma, and the Medicalization of Ordinary Life (pp. 193-6): Allen Frances, William Morrow & Company (20 May 2013).

Also in Essentials of Psychiatric Diagnosis: Responding to the Challenge of DSM-5 (Chapter 16): Allen Frances, Guilford Press (14 June 2013).

In the June edition of Journal of Nervous and Mental Disorders, Allen Frances, MD, who chaired the Task Force for DSM-IV, discusses his concerns for the loosely defined DSM-5 category, Somatic Symptom Disorder, sets out his suggestions for revising the criteria prior to finalization, as presented to the SSD Work Group chair, in December, and advises clinicians against using the new SSD diagnosis.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23719325

DSM-5 Somatic Symptom Disorder.

Frances A.

Department of Psychiatry, Duke University, Durham, NC.

J Nerv Ment Dis. 2013 Jun;201(6):530-1. doi: 10.1097/NMD.0b013e318294827c. No abstract available.

PMID: 23719325

[PubMed – in process]

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Commentary by Allen Frances, MD, and Suzy Chapman in the May issue of Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry. The paper discusses the over-inclusive DSM-5 Somatic Symptom Disorder criteria and the potential implications for diverse patient groups. The paper concludes by advising clinicians not to use the new SSD diagnosis.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23653063

DSM-5 somatic symptom disorder mislabels medical illness as mental disorder.

Allen Frances¹, Suzy Chapman²

1 Department of Psychiatry, Duke University 2 DxRevisionWatch.com

Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2013 May;47(5):483-4. doi: 10.1177/0004867413484525. No abstract available.

PMID: 23653063

[PubMed – in process]

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The April 22 edition of Current Biology published a feature article on DSM-5 by science writer, Michael Gross, Ph.D. The article includes quotes from Allen Frances, MD, and Suzy Chapman on the implications for patients for the application of the new DSM-5 Somatic Symptom Disorder. The article includes concerns for the influence of Somatic Symptom Disorder on proposals for a new ICD category – Bodily Distress Disorder – being field tested for ICD-11 and ICD-11-PHC.

Current Biology 22 April, 2013 Volume 23, Issue 8

Copyright 2013 All rights reserved. Current Biology, Volume  23, Issue  8, R295-R298, 22 April 2013

doi:10.1016/j.cub.2013.04.009

Feature

Has the manual gone mental?

Michael Gross

Full text: http://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(13)00417-X

PDF: http://download.cell.com/current-biology/pdf/PIIS096098221300417X.pdf

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In this opinion piece, published in the BMJ, March 18, Allen Frances, MD, strongly opposes the new Somatic Symptom Disorder, discusses its lack of specificity, data from the field trials and advises clinicians to ignore this new category.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23511949

The new somatic symptom disorder in DSM-5 risks mislabeling many people as mentally ill.

Frances A.

Allen Frances, chair of the DSM-IV task force

BMJ. 2013 Mar 18;346:f1580. doi: 10.1136/bmj.f1580. No abstract available.

PMID: 23511949

[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

+++

Further reading

APA Somatic Symptom Disorder Fact Sheet APA DSM-5 Resources

Somatic Chapter Drops Centrality Of Unexplained Medical Symptoms Psychiatric News, Mark Moran, March 1, 2013

Somatic Symptoms Criteria in DSM-5 Improve Diagnosis, Care David J Kupfer, MD, Chair, DSM-5 Task Force, defends the SSD construct, Huffington Post, February 8, 2013

The new somatic symptom disorder in DSM-5 risks mislabeling many people as mentally ill Allen Frances, MD, BMJ 2013;346:f1580 BMJ Press Release

Somatic Symptom Disorder could capture millions more under mental health diagnosis Suzy Chapman, May 26, 2012

Mislabeling Medical Illness As Mental Disorder Allen Frances, MD, Psychology Today, DSM 5 in Distress, December 8, 2012

Why Did DSM 5 Botch Somatic Symptom Disorder? Allen Frances, MD, Psychology Today, Saving Normal, February 6, 2013

New Psych Disorder Could Mislabel Sick as Mentally Ill Susan Donaldson James, ABC News, February 27, 2013

Dimsdale JE. Medically unexplained symptoms: a treacherous foundation for somatoform disorders? Psychiatr Clin North Am 2011;34:511-3. [PMID: 21889675]

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DSM-5 Round up: May #1

Post #245 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2WM

More reports on last week’s announcement by NIMH Director, Thomas Insel

BMJ News [Full report behind paywall]

Director of top research organization for mental health criticizes DSM for lack of validity

BMJ 2013; 346 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.f2954 (Published 8 May 2013)

Michael McCarthy, Seattle | May 8, 2013


New Scientist print edition No 2196 May 11, 2013

[The first of these two print edition articles is behind a subscription]

How a scientific DSM will transform psychiatry

Peter Aldhous, Andy Coghlan, additional reporting by Sara Reardon

This article appears in the print edition THIS WEEK section under the headline

A revolution in mental health, Patients deserve better than an unscientific manual, says leading health institute

…don’t expect the landscape of mental illness to change any time soon. Insel accepts that it will take at least a decade to conduct the research necessary to devise a new approach to diagnosis. In the meantime, patients’ illnesses will continue to be diagnosed using the DSM’s symptom-based categories…

…Even the transition in research will be gradual – the NIMH isn’t going to stop funding projects based around DSM diagnoses overnight. But it is clear that new approaches will get priority in future, and with a budget of almost $1.5 billion per year, the NIMH is in a position to call the shots…

This week’s Editorial in the print edition is an edited version of the Allen Frances opinion piece published by New Scientist earlier this week:

Print edition Editorial > Opinion

Don’t count on this manual, The future of psychiatric research lies in simpler questions, by Allen Frances


UK Independent

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders has been updated but should we beware this manual’s diagnosis?

The book which gives doctors a checklist for mental illnesses – as made famous by The Psychopath Test – has been updated. But does it really work?

…An alternative – and free – publication, International Statistical Classification of Diseases (ICD), issued by the World Health Organisation, provides an official international classification system of mental illness that the DSM sometimes borrows. The ICD is used in Europe for clinical treatment in preference to the DSM and without the lurid headlines. The DSM, though, is increasingly influential on our way of thinking about mental health…

Mark Piesing | May 8, 2013

Comment to article from Dx Revision Watch


For global usage of DSM v ICD by practising psychiatrists and country by country breakdown see
Slide 17 Global use of DSM-5 and ICD-10; Slide 18 Use by country breakdown http://www.aaidd.org/media/3192013.pdf
Data from The WPA-WHO Global Survey of Psychiatrists’ Attitudes Towards Mental Disorders Classification Free full paper

UK Radio

BBC R4 Today programme

Discussion on DSM-5 | Today programme, Thurs, May 9

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01s8qx7/Today_09_05_2013/

1 hr.50 mins in from start |  7 minutes

With James Davies, Lecturer and author of “Cracked” (has also had two articles around his book published in the Times)

Does your child really have a behavioural problem? James Davies, May 6 2013

and Prof Nick Craddock

+++
BBC R4 All in the Mind [One year left to listen again]

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p018qfjm

Presenter Claudia Hammond

The new edition of the American Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders will be launched later this month, Professor Simon Wessely discusses its potential impact in the UK.

Duration: 9 mins at start of 28 min broadcast| Tuesday 07 May 2013 21:00 | Repeated Wed 8 May 2013 15:30

Discussion omitted any reference to, and implications for the WHO/APA International Advisory Group for the Revision of ICD-10 Mental and Behavioural Disorders commitment to strive as far as possible for harmonization between the mental health chapter of the forthcoming ICD-11 (Chapter 5) and DSM-5.

The Scientist

NIMH to Steer Away from New Manual

The agency will no longer use the newly revised guide to mental disorders to categorize its funding priorities.

Kate Yandell | May 9, 2013

…To better classify mental disease, the NIMH has started the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) project, which Insel said will “transform diagnosis by incorporating genetics, imaging, cognitive science, and other levels of information to lay the foundation for a new classification system.” However, biological biomarkers for mental disease are few, so Insel said that RDoC is more of a framework for future knowledge to fit into than a completed classification system…

…In order to better fill in the gaps, he said that NIMH grant applicants will be asked to think of research projects that cut across diagnoses…

…NIMH is not “ditching” the DSM completely, Insel told Time. DSM diagnostic criteria will continue to be important in the clinic, just not as guides for research.


+++
Not specific to recent announcement by NIMH’s, Thomas Insel

Huffington Post [Also at Psychiatric Times, Psychology Today]

Hippocratic Humility in the Face of ‘Unexplained’ Medical Problems

Allen Frances, MD | May 7, 2013

With contribution from Dr Diane O’Leary


National Pain Report

Could Fibromyalgia Be Labeled as a Psychiatric Illness?

Celeste Cooper, RN | May 5, 2013

+++

Related material

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) announcement Transforming Diagnosis
Published by Thomas Insel, Director, NIMH, April 29, 2013

Full text of rebuttal statement from David J Kupfer, Chair, DSM-5 Task Force, press released by APA on May 6, 2013
Dx Revision Watch Post #242: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2VO

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DSM-5 and the NIMH Research Domain Criteria Project Psychiatric Times, James Phillips, MD, April 13, 2011

NIMH Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) Draft 3.1: June, 2011

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International media Round up #1: National Institute of Mental Health to re-orientate research away from DSM categories

International media Round up #1: National Institute of Mental Health to re-orientate research away from DSM categories

Post #243 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2VZ

Update: Additional media coverage on NIMH added (Matthew Herper, Forbes; Deborah Brauser, Medscape Medical News; Ferris Jabr, Scientific America; John M Grohol, PsychCentral; TIME; 1 Boring Old Man), plus details of DSM-5 on BBC R4 radio

BBC R4’s All in the Mind this evening will be discussing the impact of the DSM on UK mental health and asking whether or not we in the UK pay any attention to what it contains. No other details about whom Claudia Hammond will be interviewing:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01s8cpf

BBC Radio 4 | Duration: 28 minutes | Tuesday 07 May 2013 21:00 | Wed 8 May 2013 15:30


Yesterday, American Psychiatric Association press released a rebuttal from DSM-5 Task Force Chair, David J Kupfer, to the announcement, last week, that the world’s largest federal mental health funding agency will be re-orientating research away from DSM categories.

Read Kupfer’s statement here:

Statement, David Kupfer, MD, May 3, 2013 [press@psych.org Release No. 13-33]

Chair of DSM-5 Task Force Discusses Future of Mental Health Research

Click link for PDF document American Psychiatric Association Press Release

+++

The story is trickling into mainstream media and being picked up internationally. For earlier media and blogger coverage, see Dx Revision Watch post: National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) to ditch the DSM (May 3).

There has been mixed reaction to this announcement by NIMH’s Director, Thomas Insel, with many welcoming a shift from DSM dominance but scepticism, also, over whether NIMH might realistically achieve its objectives, as set out a couple of years ago.

+++
Media Round up #1


Forbes

Pharma & Healthcare

Why Psychiatry’s Seismic Shift Will Happen Slowly

Matthew Herper Forbes Staff | May 8, 2013

…I called the NIMH, and was put on the phone with Bruce Cuthbert, the director of the division of adult translational research. I had a pretty simple question. If the NIMH were really rejecting or abandoning the DSM, that would mean the agency wouldn’t accept studies that use DSM-5 criteria. For instance, if you wanted to test a new schizophrenia drug in schizophrenics, you’d have to find some new RDoC way of describing the disease.

Cuthbert said repeatedly that would not be the case. It’s not so much that studies that use the DSM-5 will be excluded and abandoned, but that researchers would now be allowed to apply for grants that would not use the manual’s diagnostic criteria, or subdivided them in new, creative ways…


Medscape Medical News > Psychiatry

NIMH, APA Clash Over Upcoming DSM-5

‘Patients Deserve Better,’ NIMH Director Says

Deborah Brauser | May 7, 2013


Scientific America

No One Is Abandoning the DSM, But It Is Almost Time to Transform It

Ferris Jabr | May 7, 2013


PsychCentral

Did the NIMH Withdraw Support for the DSM-5? No

John M. Grohol, Psy.D. | May 7, 2013

…Will this replace the DSM-5? No, because as Dr. Insel notes, “This is a decade-long project that is just beginning.” If the NIMH effort ever replaces the DSM, it will be a long time from now…

“I also should point out that these comments reflect [only] our translational research portfolios. Our Division of Services and Intervention Research mostly supports research conducted in clinical settings that is relevant to current clinical practice and services delivery. Thus, […] grants in these areas will continue to be predominantly funded with DSM categories for some time.” [according to Dr. Bruce Cuthbert, director of the Division of Adult Translational Research at the National Institute of Mental Health]


1 Boring Old Man

…groundhog day

1 Boring Old Man | May 7, 2013


TIME

Mental Illness

Mental Health Researchers Reject Psychiatry’s New Diagnostic ‘Bible’

Maia Szalavitz | May 7, 2013

Just weeks before psychiatry’s new diagnostic “bible”—the DSM 5— is set to be released, the world’s major funder of mental health research has announced that it will not use the new diagnostic system to guide its scientific program, a change some observers have called “a cataclysm” and “potentially seismic.” Dr. Thomas Insel, the director of the National Institute on Mental Health, said in a blog post last week that “NIMH will be re-orienting its research away from DSM categories.”

The change will not immediately affect patients. But in the long run, it could completely redefine mental health conditions and developmental disorders. All of the current categories — from autism to schizophrenia — could be replaced by genetic, biochemical or brain-network labeled classifications. Psychiatrists, who are already reeling from the conflict-filled birth of the fifth edition of the Diagnostical and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, are feeling whipsawed…

…The NIMH has outlined a new diagnostic system — called Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) — that could ultimately replace the DSM, but it’s not yet ready for prime time. For the time being, NIMH and the psychiatrists who use the manual will continue to abide by existing classifications for diagnosing patients and getting treatment reimbursed. “Some people have the idea that we’re trying to ditch or diss the DSM and that’s not a fair assessment,” says Insel…


New York Times

Psychiatry’s Guide Is Out of Touch With Science, Experts Say

Pam Belluck and Benedict Carey | May 6, 2013

…“As long as the research community takes the D.S.M. to be a bible, we’ll never make progress,” Dr. Insel said, adding, “People think that everything has to match D.S.M. criteria, but you know what? Biology never read that book.”

…Dr. Insel said in the interview that his motivation was not to disparage the D.S.M. as a clinical tool, but to encourage researchers and especially outside reviewers who screen proposals for financing from his agency to disregard its categories and investigate the biological underpinnings of disorders instead. He said he had heard from scientists whose proposals to study processes common to depression, schizophrenia and psychosis were rejected by grant reviewers because they cut across D.S.M. disease categories.

“They didn’t get it,” Dr. Insel said of the reviewers. “What we’re trying to do with RDoC is say actually this is a fresh way to think about it.”

He added that he hoped researchers would also participate in projects funded through the Obama administration’s new brain initiative.

Dr. Michael First, a psychiatry professor at Columbia who edited the last edition of the manual, said, “RDoC is clearly the way of the future,” although it would take years to get results that could apply to patients. In the meantime, he said, “RDoC can’t do what the D.S.M. does. The D.S.M. is what clinicians use. Patients will always come into offices with symptoms.”

For at least a decade, Dr. First and others said, patients will continue to be diagnosed with D.S.M. categories as a guide, and insurance companies will reimburse with such diagnoses in mind…


Science Insider

NIMH Won’t Follow Psychiatry ‘Bible’ Anymore

Emily Underwood | May 6, 2013

…Helena Kraemer, a biostatistician at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, who was responsible for field trials of diagnostic categories proposed for DSM-5, says that Insel is right that the NIMH’s new program, called Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) is “the direction we have to go.” However, she says, “he’s wrong in saying that DSM-5 is to be set aside.” When it comes to validity, there now is no gold standard, she says. “The DSM is a series of successive approximations.” Kraemer’s vision is that future versions of the manual will not have to wait 10 to 15 years for revision, but incorporate new scientific data from RDoC as it emerges. She says that a meeting is scheduled in June to discuss the possibility of converting the DSM into an electronic document that could incorporate those changes. “Everybody I’ve talked to about it thinks that’s a good idea.”

…Implementing RDoC will present some practical challenges, [William] Carpenter acknowledges. “This does shift the paradigm.” Rather than excluding all study subjects who do not fit a DSM diagnosis, such as major depression, for example, the new approach might include a range of participants with different diagnoses who all demonstrate anhedonia, the impaired ability to experience pleasure, and might look for underlying brain abnormalities that they share in common. “I bet that the rough spots are overcome pretty quickly,” Carpenter says, “but of course we have to see how well that actually works out…”


The Globe and Mail [Canada]

American Psychiatric Association rebuked over new diagnostic manual

Wency Leung | May 6, 2013

…[Gary] Greenberg says that while he believes that this change in the institute’s research direction will generate a huge amount of science on mental health, he is skeptical that researchers will be able to boil down the extraordinarily complex workings of the brain into sound and specific diagnostic criteria.

In response to Insel, the APA issued a statement on Saturday by David Kupfer, chair of the DSM-5 task force, noting that it has been waiting for decades for reliable biological and genetic markers on which to base precise diagnoses. “We are still waiting,” Kupfer said.

In the meantime, the DSM is the “strongest system currently available for classifying disorders,” he said.

“Efforts like the National Institute of Mental Health’s Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) are vital to the continued progress of our collective understanding of mental disorders,” Kupfer said. “But they cannot serve us in the here and now, and they cannot supplant DSM-5…”


Psychology Today Blog Mood Swings

NIMH: A Requiem for DSM – and its Critics
A new generation will reject DSM, and the anti-biological critics of DSM too

Dr. Nassir Ghaemi in Mood Swings | May 5, 2013

Update: Response from Gary Greenberg and further comment from Bernard Carroll, MD


Wetenschap 24 News [Netherlands]

Psychiaters verwerpen psychiatriebijbel

Door: Nadine Böke | mei 03, 2013

De grootste onderzoeksinstelling voor geestelijke gezondheidszorg ter wereld, het Amerikaanse NIMH (National Institute for Mental Health) verwerpt ‘psychiatriebijbel’ DSM.


LaPresse [French Canadian]

Le blogue santé

DSM-5: une bible controversée

Valérie Simard | 6 mai 2013


Agence Science-Presse [French Canadian]

Recherche: désaveu de la bible des psychiatres

Agence Science-Presse |  le 6 mai 2013

(Agence Science-Presse) L’ouvrage qu’on décrit sans cesse comme la «bible» des maladies mentales, et dont la nouvelle édition, après des années d’attente, doit paraître ce mois-ci, vient d’être écarté par rien de moins que le plus gros organisme subventionnaire de la recherche sur les maladies mentales au monde.


De Morgen [Belgium]

Something rotten in de psychiatrie

OPINIE − 07/05/13

De labelingmachine van de DSM 5 is mensonwaardig.
Wat doet de overheid, vraagt Marc Calmeyn. Calmeyn is psychiater en psychoanalyticus. Hij werkt in Brugge.


For earlier media and blogger coverage, see Dx Revision Watch post: National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) to ditch the DSM.

Kupfer (APA) statement on National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) announcement

Kupfer (APA) statement on National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) announcement

Post #242 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2VO

David J Kupfer, Chair, DSM-5 Task Force, has issued a statement in response to the April 29 announcement by NIMH’s Thomas Insel:

 Click link for PDF document   American Psychiatric Association Press Release

Text:

For Information Contact:

Eve Herold, 703-907-8640 May 3, 2013

press@psych.org Release No. 13-33

Erin Connors, 703-907-8562

econnors@psych.org

Statement by David Kupfer, MD

Chair of DSM-5 Task Force Discusses Future of Mental Health Research

The promise of the science of mental disorders is great. In the future, we hope to be able to identify disorders using biological and genetic markers that provide precise diagnoses that can be delivered with complete reliability and validity. Yet this promise, which we have anticipated since the 1970s, remains disappointingly distant. We’ve been telling patients for several decades that we are waiting for biomarkers. We’re still waiting. In the absence of such major discoveries, it is clinical experience and evidence, as well as growing empirical research, that have advanced our understanding of disorders such as autism spectrum disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia.

This progress will soon be recognized in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). The new manual, due for release later this month, represents the strongest system currently available for classifying disorders. It reflects the progress that we have made in several important areas.

A revised chapter organization signals how disorders may relate to each other based on underlying vulnerabilities or symptom characteristics.

Disorders are framed in the context of age, gender, and cultural expectations, in addition to being organized along a valuable developmental lifespan within each chapter.

Key disorders were combined or reorganized because the relationships among categories clearly placed them along a single continuum, such as substance use disorder and autism spectrum disorder.

A new section introduces emerging measures, models and cultural guidance to assist clinicians in their evaluation of patients. For the first time, self-assessment tools are included to directly engage patients in their diagnosis and care.

DSM, at its core, is a guidebook to help clinicians describe and diagnose the behaviors and symptoms of their patients. It provides clinicians with a common language to deliver the best patient care possible. And through content such as the new Section III, the next manual also aims to encourage future directions in research.

Efforts like the National Institute of Mental Health’s Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) are vital to the continued progress of our collective understanding of mental disorders. But they cannot serve us in the here and now, and they cannot supplant DSM-5. RDoC is a complementary endeavor to move us forward, and its results may someday culminate in the genetic and neuroscience breakthroughs that will revolutionize our field. In the meantime, should we merely hand patients another promissory note that something may happen sometime? Every day, we are dealing with impairment or tangible suffering, and we must respond. Our patients deserve no less.

The American Psychiatric Association is a national medical specialty society whose physician members specialize in the diagnosis, treatment, prevention and research of mental illnesses, including substance use disorders. Visit the APA at www.psychiatry.org

ENDS

APA website: New documents and videos on ‘Somatic Symptom Disorder; article: Psychiatric News

APA website: New documents and videos on ‘Somatic Symptom Disorder; article: Psychiatric News

Post #228 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2Gi

Updates at March 7

Article in Die Psychiatrie

Somatic Symptom Disorders: a new approach in DSM-5

J. E. Dimsdale, University of California, San Diego, DSM Task force, Somatic Symptoms Work Group

Die Psychiatrie 2013; 10: 30–32

Summary

Following a brief historic discourse, problems with the current use and concepts the of somatoform disorders are described. The rationale for substituting the term “somatoform” with “somatic symptom” in DSM5 is explained and the new classification criteria for the group of “somatic symptom related disorders” are described, which include severity ratings.

A special aspect is that “Illness anxiety disorder” is introduced as a new diagnostic entity in DSM-5.

“Störung mit somatischen Symptomen”: ein neuer Ansatz in DSM-5

Zusammenfassung

Nach einem kurzen historischen Diskurs werden die Problembereiche und die Konzepte der somatoformen Störungen erläutert. Das Rational für einen Ersatz der “somatoformen” Störung durch eine “Störung mit somatischen Symptomen” in DSM5 wird erläutert. Die Klassifikationskriterien der Gruppe der “Störungen mit somatischen Symptomen” wird dargestellt.

Ein besonderer Aspekt ist die Einführung einer “Erkrankungsangst-Störung” in DSM-5.

Full paper can be downloaded here: http://bit.ly/W7filu

Doug Bremner, MD, comments on ‘Somatic Symptom Disorder’ here:

DSM-5 Somatic Symptoms Disorder is Going to Make Us All Mental

Doug Bremner | February 12, 2013

 

A number of new documents and short videos on ‘Somatic Symptom Disorder’ have been published on the APA’s new webpages, plus an article in Psychiatric News, published on March 1.

These are followed by recent, mainstream media coverage of concerns for all illness groups for the implications of misdiagnosis with ‘Somatic Symptom Disorder’ or for an additional diagnosis of ‘Somatic Symptom Disorder.’

http://www.psychiatry.org/practice/dsm/dsm5/dsm-5

Fact Sheet: Click link for PDF document   Somatic Symptom Disorder

Videos:

Joel E Dimsdale, Chair, DSM-5 Somatic Symptom Disorders Work Group

What is Somatic Symptom Disorder?

http://www.psychiatry.org/practice/dsm/dsm5/dsm-5-video-series-somatic-symptom-disorder

What was the rationale behind changes to Somatic Symptom Disorder?

http://www.psychiatry.org/practice/dsm/dsm5/dsm-5-video-series-changes-to-somatic-symptoms

Will Somatic Symptom Disorder result in the missing of other medical problems?

http://www.psychiatry.org/practice/dsm/dsm5/dsm-5-video-series-somatic-symptom-disorder-and-other-medical-problems

Article: Psychiatric News (organ of the APA):

http://psychnews.psychiatryonline.org/newsArticle.aspx?articleid=1659603

Psychiatric News | March 01, 2013
Volume 48 Number 5 page 7-7
10.1176/appi.pn.2013.3a26
American Psychiatric Association
Professional News

Somatic Chapter Drops Centrality Of Unexplained Medical Symptoms

Mark Moran

“…But Joel Dimsdale, M.D., chair of the Somatic Symptom and Related Disorders Work Group, emphasized that the most important change overall in this set of disorders is removal of the centrality of medically unexplained symptoms. “That was a defining characteristic of these disorders in DSM-IV, but we believe it was unhelpful and promoted a mind-body dualism that is hard to justify,” he told Psychiatric News.

So, for instance, the diagnosis of somatization disorder in DSM-IV was based on a long and complex symptom count of medically unexplained symptoms. DSM-5 criteria eliminate that requirement and recognize that individuals who meet criteria for somatic symptom disorder—the new designation, marked by disproportionate thoughts, feelings, and behaviors related to somatic symptoms—may or may not have a medically diagnosed condition.

Hypochondriasis has been eliminated; most individuals who would previously have been diagnosed with hypochondriasis have significant somatic symptoms in addition to their high health anxiety and should receive a DSM-5 diagnosis of somatic symptom disorder. Those with high health anxiety without somatic symptoms should receive a diagnosis of illness anxiety disorder…

Read full article here

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Related material

Dimsdale JE. Medically Unexplained Symptoms: A Treacherous Foundation for Somatoform Disorders? Psychiatr Clin North Am, Volume 34, Issue 3, Pages 511-513 [PUBMED 21889675]

Overlapping Conditions Alliance (OCA)

“Members of the Overlapping Conditions Alliance (OCA) produced a white paper, Chronic Pain in Women: Neglect, Dismissal and Discrimination, to promote awareness and research of neglected and poorly understood chronic pain conditions that affect millions of American women. This report, which can be viewed and downloaded below, includes detailed policy recommendations to further these goals.” (Report 2010 and Report 2011)

http://www.endwomenspain.org/resources/policy-analysis-recommendations

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Recent mainstream media coverage of the SSD issue

ABC News Radio:
Guidelines for Diagnosing Psychiatric Disorder May Overlook Physical Illnesses

ABC News:
New Psych Disorder Could Mislabel Sick as Mentally Ill

Canada.com and syndicated to a number of other Canadian media sites:
New “catch all” psychiatric disorder could label people who worry about their health as mentally ill

Fox News Health:
Does somatic symptom disorder really exist?

DSM-5 Task Force Chair, David J Kupfer, MD, defends the SSD construct on Huffington Post (but provides no answers to my questions):

David J. Kupfer, M.D. Chair, DSM-5 Task Force

Somatic Symptoms Criteria in DSM-5 Improve Diagnosis, Care

DSM-5 and ICD-10-CM Round up: February #3

DSM-5 and ICD-10-CM Round up: February #3

Post #227 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2FY

Updates:

American Psychiatric Association News release:

Release No. 13-11: February 28, 2013

APA Annual Meeting in San Francisco, May 18-22; DSM-5 to be Released

ARLINGTON, Va. (Feb. 28, 2013) – The American Psychiatric Association’s 166th Annual Meeting, the world’s largest psychiatric meeting, will run Saturday, May 18 to Wednesday, May 22, 2013 in San Francisco at the Moscone Convention Center. The much anticipated DSM-5, the latest revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, will be released at the meeting…

Clinical Psychiatry News Digital Network

DSM-5 expected to be more ‘user-friendly’

Doug Brunk | March 3, 2013

ABC News Radio

An edited version of the ABC News coverage of concerns for new DSM-5 disorder ‘Somatic Symptom Disorder’ that replaces four DSM-IV Somatoform Disorder categories has been published on ABC News Radio:

Guidelines for Diagnosing Psychiatric Disorder May Overlook Physical Illnesses

CMS pledges commitment to October 1, 2014 ICD-10-CM compliance:

Click link for PDF document   CMS letter

CMS: No Further Delays in ICD-10-CM/PCS Implementation

Chris Dimick | AHIMA & ICD-10 | February 27, 2013

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) will maintain their commitment to the current ICD-10-CM/PCS compliance date of October 1, 2014, according to a letter sent to AHIMA President Kathleen A. Frawley.

The letter was sent in response to AHIMA’s call for CMS to stand firm on its ICD-10 implementation date after more than 80 physician groups represented by the American Medical Association called on CMS in January to delay or abandon the ICD-10 conversion…

Susan Donaldson James reports for ABC News on DSM-5‘s ‘Somatic Symptom Disorder’:

Contributions from Allen Frances, MD, Joel E Dimsdale, MD (Chair, DSM-5 Somatic Symptom Disorder Work Group), Lori Chapo-Kroger (P.A.N.D.O.R.A), Suzy Chapman (Dx Revision Watch), Bridget Mildon (FND Hope) and Marianne Russo (The Coffee Klatch)

ABC News

New Psych Disorder Could Mislabel Sick as Mentally Ill

Susan Donaldson James | February 27, 2013

Critics worry that patients will be misdiagnosed as mentally ill and won’t get treatment, affecting mostly those with chronic and difficult to diagnose neurological disorders and multi-system diseases like ME/CFS, ones that are poorly understood and can take years to get medical answers.

“A lot of people will be written off as crocks — it’s just in their head,” said Dr. Allen Frances, who was chair of the task force that created the DSM-4 and professor emeritus of psychiatry at Duke University. “They won’t get the medical work-up they need.”

…But [SSD work group chair] Dimsdale defends the updated DSM…”If it doesn’t work, we’ll fix it in the DSM-5.1 or DSM-6.”

Robert Sibley, senior writer for Ottawa Citizen, comments on DSM-5‘s ”Somatic Symptom Disorder’:

Ottowa Citizen (and  a number of syndications)

Column: Is life itself a sickness in need of a cure?

Robert Sibley | February 20, 2013

…In a recent article, Postmedia’s Sharon Kirkey quotes a statement from the American Psychiatric Association, which will publish a new edition of the DSM in May: “Some patients with illnesses like heart disease or cancer will indeed experience thoughts, feelings or behaviours related to their illness that will be extreme or overwhelming.” These individuals “may qualify for an SSD diagnosis…”

Results of recent American Psychiatric Association Trustee elections:

Helio

APA releases election results

February 25, 2013

DSM-5 (published by American Psychiatric Publishing Inc.) is planned for release at the APA’s 166th Annual Meeting, in San Francisco (May 18-22).

Psychiatric News | February 15, 2013
Volume 48 Number 4 page 21-21
10.1176/appi.pn.2013.2b24

American Psychiatric Association
Annual Meeting Highlights

Sessions Will Provide In-Depth Look at New DSM

Kuhl Emily, Ph.D.

Sidney Zizook, M.D., who served as an advisor to the DSM-5′s Mood Disorder Work Group, defends the removal of the DSM ‘bereavement exclusion’:

Scientific American

Getting Past the Grief over Grief

Sidney Zisook | February 25, 2013

These days, I get a lot of grief about grief. I am part of the work group that changed some of the ways that grief and clinical depression are described and differentiated in the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, typically referred to as DSM-5. That has led to a lot of conversations with colleagues who are upset about bereavement…

Kupfer DJ, Regier DA, et al in JAMA ONLINE FIRST

JAMA ONLINE FIRST

DSM-5—The Future Arrived FREE ONLINE FIRST

David J. Kupfer, MD; Emily A. Kuhl, PhD; Darrel A. Regier, MD, MPH

Author Affiliations: University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Dr Kupfer); and American Psychiatric Institute for Research and Education, Division of Research, American Psychiatric Association, Arlington, Virginia (Drs Kuhl and Regier).

JAMA. 2013;():1-2. doi:10.1001/jama.2013.2298.
Published online February 25, 2013

Jerome C. Wakefield, PhD, DSW, for Psychiatry Weekly, on the DSM ‘bereavement exclusion’ issue:

Remember the Bereavement Exclusion

Psychiatric Weekly

Jerome C. Wakefield, PhD, DSW | February 18, 2013

School of Social Work, Department of Psychiatry; New York University, NY

First published in Psychiatry Weekly, Volume 8, Issue 4, February 18, 2013