ICD-11 Beta draft and Bodily Distress Disorders; Per Fink and Bodily Distress Syndrome: Parts One and Two

ICD-11 Beta draft and Bodily Distress Disorders; Per Fink and Bodily Distress Syndrome Parts One and Two

Post #222 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2Dz

Caveats: The ICD-11 Beta drafting platform is not a static document: it is a work in progress, subject to daily edits and revisions, to field test evaluation and to approval by Topic Advisory Group Managing Editors, the ICD Revision Steering Group and WHO classification experts. The current draft may differ to the information in this report.

Part One

On January 6, I posted a brief update on proposals for the revision of ICD-10’s Somatoform Disorders based on what can be seen in the public version of the ICD-11 Beta drafting platform and on a book chapter by Professor, Sir David Goldberg. [1]

Professor Goldberg chairs the working group for revision of the mental health chapter of ICD-1o-PHC, the abridged, primary care version of ICD-10.

For the revision of ICD-10’s Somatoform Disorders sections for ICD-11, a WHO Expert Working Group on Somatic Distress and Dissociative Disorders has been assembled.

Professor Francis Creed (also a member of the DSM-5 Somatic Symptom and Related Disorders Work Group) is a member of this WHO working group, which is chaired by Professor Oye Gureje.

An April 2011 announcement by Stony Brook Medical Center states that Dr Joan E. Broderick, PhD had been appointed to the WHO Expert Working Group on Somatic Distress and Dissociative Disorders and that the first meeting of the group (said to consist of 17 international behavioral health professionals) was expected to be held in June 2011, in Madrid.

WHO has not published a list of  members of this working group or any progress reports and the names and affiliations of the 14 other members are unknown, so I am unable to confirm whether Professor Per Fink is a member of the group, which reports to the International Advisory Group for the Revision of ICD-10 Mental and Behavioural Disorders.

ICD-11 and Bodily Distress Disorders

ICD-11 is currently scheduled for completion in 2015/16. When viewing the public version of the Beta drafting platform please bear in mind the ICD-11 Revision Caveats: that the Beta draft is a work in progress, updated daily, is incomplete, may contain errors and is subject to change; not all proposals may be approved by the ICD-11 Revision Steering Committee or WHO classification experts, or retained following analysis of ICD-11 and ICD-11-PHC field trials.

The Bodily Distress Disorders section of ICD-11 Beta draft Chapter 5 can be found here:

Foundation View: http://apps.who.int/classifications/icd11/browse/f/en#/http%3a%2f%2fid.who.int%2ficd%2fentity%2f1472866636
Linearization View: http://apps.who.int/classifications/icd11/browse/l-m/en#/http%3a%2f%2fid.who.int%2ficd%2fentity%2f1472866636

As the ICD-11 Beta drafting platform stands at the time of compiling this report, the existing ICD-10 Somatoform Disorders are proposed to be subsumed under or replaced by Bodily Distress Disorders, and Psychological and behavioural factors associated with disorders or diseases classified elsewhere.

The following proposed ICD-11 categories are listed as child categories under parent term, Bodily Distress Disorders, and Psychological and behavioural factors associated with disorders or diseases classified elsewhere:

EC5 Mild bodily distress disorder
EC6 Moderate bodily distress disorder
EC7 Severe bodily distress disorder
EC8 Psychological and behavioural factors associated with disorders or diseases classified elsewhere

No Definition or any other Content Model parameters have been populated for the proposed categories EC5, EC6 and EC7, which are new entities to ICD. (EC8 is a legacy category from ICD-10.)

Note that the sorting codes assigned to categories are subject to frequent change as chapters are reorganized.

From the information currently displaying in the Beta draft, it is not possible to determine:

• how ICD-11 proposes to define Bodily Distress Disorders;

• what diagnostic criteria are being proposed;

whether diagnostic criteria would be based on a requirement for excessive or disproportionate psychological and behavioral characteristics in response to distressing somatic symptoms, such as illness anxiety, symptom focusing, catastrophising, maladaptive coping strategies, avoidance behavior or misattribution; or based on somatic symptom counts, or specific symptom clusters, or number of bodily systems affected, or a combination of these;

how the three Severity Specifiers: Mild, Moderate and Severe would be categorized;

• how the three Severities would be assessed for within primary and secondary care;

whether ICD-11’s proposed Bodily Distress Disorder construct is intended to mirror or incorporate DSM-5’s Somatic Symptom Disorder (SSD) construct, in line with ICD-11/DSM-5 harmonization, or

whether it is intended to mirror or incorporate Per Fink’s Bodily Distress Syndrome (BDS) construct, or to combine elements from both;

whether the Bodily Distress Disorder construct is proposed only to be applied to patients with distressing ‘medically unexplained somatic symptoms’ (MUS), or the so-called ‘Functional somatic syndromes’ (FSS), if the patient is considered to also meet the BDD criteria, or

whether it is proposed to be inclusive of patients with distressing somatic symptoms in the presence of diagnosed illness and general medical conditions, if the patient is considered to also meet the criteria;

• whether the Bodily Distress Disorder construct is proposed to be inclusive of parents or caregivers perceived as encouraging maintenance of sick role behavior or over-involved.

whether the Bodily Distress Disorder construct is proposed to be inclusive of children;

whether it is proposed that all or selected of the following: Neurasthenia and Fatigue syndrome (F48.0), Chronic fatigue syndrome (indexed to G93.3 in ICD-10; classified in ICD-11 Beta draft as an ICD Title term in Chapter 6: Diseases of the nervous system), IBS (K58), and Fibromyalgia (M79.7) should be reclassified under Bodily Distress Disorders;

• whether the Bodily Distress Disorder construct is proposed to subsume ICD-10’s Hypochondriacal disorder with somatic symptoms or incorporate this entity under Illness Anxiety Disorder for ICD-11.

(For ICD-11, ICD-10’s Hypochondriacal disorder [F45.2] is currently proposed to be renamed to Illness Anxiety Disorder and located underANXIETY AND FEAR-RELATED DISORDERS.)

 • what ICD-11 proposes to do with ICD-10’s Neurasthenia;

(ICD-10’s Chapter V Neurasthenia [F48.0] is no longer listed in the public version of the ICD-11 Beta draft. For ICD-11-PHC, the primary care version of ICD-11, the proposal is for the term Neurasthenia to be eliminated. Since terms used in ICD-11-PHC require corresponding terms in the main classification, the intention may be to eliminate Neurasthenia from the main version, or subsume under another term.) [2]

All that can be determined from the Beta draft is that these earlier ICD-11 Beta draft Somatoform Disorders categories appear proposed to be subsumed under or replaced with the new BDD categories, EC5, EC6 and EC7, set out above:

Somatization disorder [F45.0 in ICD-10]
Undifferentiated somatoform disorder [F45.1 in ICD-10]
Somatoform autonomic dysfunction [F45.3 in ICD-10]
Persistent somatoform pain disorder [F45.4 in ICD-10]
    > Persistent somatoform pain disorder
    > Chronic pain disorder with somatic and psychological factors [Not in ICD-10]
Other somatoform disorders [F45.8 in ICD-10]
Somatoform disorder, unspecified [F45.9 in ICD-10]

I have previously reported that for ICD-11-PHC, the proposal, last year, was for a new disorder section called Bodily distress disorders, under which would sit new category Bodily stress [sic] syndrome.

This category is proposed for the ICD-11 primary care version to include “milder somatic symptom disorders” as well as “DSM-5’s Complex somatic symptom disorder” and would replace “medically unexplained somatic symptoms.” [2]

In a future post (Part Three of this report), I shall be discussing emerging proposals for the ICD-11 construct, Bodily Distress Disorders, which may serve to fill in some of the gaps.

In the meantime, since it is unclear whether and to what extent the ICD-11 Bodily Distress Disorders category is proposed to mirror or incorporate the Bodily Distress Syndrome construct developed by Per Fink et al, Aarhus, Denmark, I am providing some material on Bodily Distress Syndrome in Part Two

Important changes to DSM-5 Development website: Draft proposals and criteria removed

Important changes to DSM-5 Development website: Draft proposals and criteria removed

Post #208 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2wk

Update: November 16: Webpages on the DSM-5 Development site that were no longer accessible, yesterday, via the home page or a Proposals tab menu but were still accessible via their URLs have today been placed behind a log  in.

Following closure of the third and final DSM-5 stakeholder review, revisions made by the 13 Work Groups and Task Force to proposals and criteria for DSM-5 subsequent to June 15 are subject to embargo.

You can read the DSM-5 Permissions Policy here  (Updated: 5/30/2012).

The DSM-5 Development site Terms and Conditions of Use can be read here (Effective Date: June 21, 20120).

The Terms and Conditions of Use page has not been updated to reflect very recent changes to the website.

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Removal of proposals for DSM-5 categories and criteria

I have a webpage change detection service set up for the home page and selected pages of the DSM-5 Development site.

Today, November 15, I was notified that the DSM-5 Development home page text has been recently edited.

The home page text has been revised and the 20 links towards the foot of the home page text to Proposed Revisions have been removed, as has the drop-down tab menu for Proposed Revisions, Rationales, Severity Specifiers for the 20 DSM-5 category sections.

The revised home text can be read here.

The home page text as it had stood prior to recent editing can be reviewed (for a while) on this Google cache page.

[…Google’s cache of http://www.dsm5.org/ . It is a snapshot of the page as it appeared on 4 Nov 2012 21:50:47 GMT…]

The DSM manual and its clinical and research criteria sets are a major cash cow for the publishing arm of the APA.

APA is protecting its intellectual property rights by removing draft criteria as they had stood at June 15, 2012 and in placing an embargo on interim revisions to the texts, prior to publication of the final categories, criteria sets and associated textual content, next year.

Consequently, draft proposals, criteria, rationales, severity specifiers and for some categories, PDF files expanding on proposals and rationales, as they had stood at the time of the third draft, are no longer available for review or for comparison with earlier iterations of the draft directly from links on the site’s home page text or from links in a Proposals tab drop-down menu along the top of the home page.

According to the DSM-5 Development home page and recent commentary from Task Force Chair, David J Kupfer, MD, DSM-5 remains on target for release in May 2013.

No recent projections for the date by which an online version of the DSM-5 is expected to be available, post publication of the print edition, have come to my attention but it is anticipated that access to any online version of the manual would be available via subscription – not as a freely accessible public domain version, as ICD-10-CM and ICD-11 will be when they are published and implemented.

Slide presentation: Per Fink: Somatoform disorders – functional somatic syndromes – Bodily distress syndrome (EACLPP lecture, June 2012)

Slide presentation: Per Fink: Somatoform disorders – functional somatic syndromes – Bodily distress syndrome (EACLPP lecture, June 2012)

Post #197 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2pN

Slide presentation: Per Fink: Somatoform disorders – functional somatic syndromes – Bodily distress syndrome (EACLPP lecture, June 2012)

23 slides in PDF format (i.e. no PowerPoint viewer required)

       EACLPP Per Fink Somatoform Disorders

Aarhus University Hospital

The Research Clinic for Functional Disorders and Psychosomatics

Somatoform disorders – functional somatic syndromes – Bodily distress syndrome.

Need for care and organisation of care in an international perspective – EACLPP Lecture

Prof. Per Fink

MD, Ph.D, Dr.Med.Sc.

www.functionaldisorders.dk

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June 2012 EACLPP Annual Conference*

*The European Association of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry and Psychosomatics (EACLPP) and the European Network of Psychosomatic Medicine (ECPR) have recently merged the two associations to create a new society – the European Association of Psychosomatic Medicine (EAPM).

The Annual Scientific Meeting of the European Association for Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry and Psychosomatics (EACLPP) and the European Conference on Psychosomatic Research (ECPR) was entitled

“Towards a New Agenda: Cross-disciplinary Approach to Psychosomatic Medicine”

The conference was held in the city of Aarhus, Denmark, on 27 – 30 June 2012.

For last year’s conference, a report was published. I will post any report coming out of this year’s conference.

A Conference Abstract document be accessed here:

http://www.eaclpp-ecpr2012.dk/Home/DownloadOral

Selected Extracts:

Page 61 Nagel A

Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf & Schön Klinik Hamburg-Eilbek, Germany, Voigt K Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Hamburg- Eppendorf & Schön Klinik Hamburg-Eilbek, Germany

Diagnostic validity of Complex Somatic Symptom Disorder: Which combination of psychological criteria is best suited for DSM-5?

Page 17 Budtz-Lilly A

The Research Unit for General Practice, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Denmark

Bodily Distress Syndrome: A new diagnosis for functional disorders in primary care

Page 19 Escobar J

Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ, USA

An Update on DSM-5

Page 32 Fjorback L

Aarhus University Hospital, Research Clinic for Functional Disorders and Psychosomatics

Mindfulness Therapy for Bodily Distress Syndrome – randomized trial, one-year follow-up, active control

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Notes on Fink et al and Bodily Distress Syndrome (BDS)

According to Fink and colleagues, Bodily Distress Syndrome is a unifying diagnosis that encompasses somatization disorder, so-called “medically unexplained symptoms” (MUS), fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and chronic fatigue syndrome and some other conditions which they consider to be closely related, with a likely shared underlying aetiology.

See paper: Fink P, Schröder A. One single diagnosis, bodily distress syndrome, succeeded to capture 10 diagnostic categories of functional somatic syndromes and somatoform disorders J Psychosom Res. 2010 May;68(5):415-26.

See article: Per Fink,a Marianne Rosendal b Understanding and Management of Functional Somatic Symptoms in Primary Care: The Concept of Functional Somatic Symptoms

aResearch Clinic for Functional Disorders and Psychosomatics, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark
bResearch Unit for General Practice, University of Aarhus, Denmark

See Per Fink’s clinical trial for BDS: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01518647

See BDS clinician/patient manual: Specialised Treatment for Severe Bodily Distress Syndromes (STreSS)

According to a June 2012 EACLPP Conference Abstract, the concept of Bodily Distress Syndrome (BDS) “is expected to be integrated into the upcoming versions of classification systems.”

The potential for inclusion of Bodily Distress Disorder/Syndrome within ICD-11 could have significant implications for patients, globally, who are diagnosed with one of the so-called “functional somatic syndromes.” These proposals require very close monitoring by patient organizations in those countries that will be implementing ICD-11, post 2015.

Research and clinical professionals, patient organizations and their professional advisors can register now with ICD Revision for input into the ongoing drafting process and urge organizations and professionals to engage in this process.

Abstracts, oral presentations, EACLPP Conference: 27 – 30 June 2012, Aarhus University Campus, Aarhus – Denmark

http://www.eaclpp-ecpr2012.dk/Home/DownloadOral

Extracts

Page 17 Budtz-Lilly A

The Research Unit for General Practice, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Denmark

Bodily Distress Syndrome: A new diagnosis for functional disorders in primary care

Aim: Medically unexplained or functional symptoms and disorders are common in primary care. Empirical research has proposed specific criteria for a new unifying diagnosis for functional disorders and syndromes: Bodily Distress Syndrome (BDS). This new concept is expected to be integrated into the upcoming versions of classification systems.

And from Page 31 of the Conference Abstracts:

Fjorback L

Aarhus University Hospital, Research Clinic for Functional Disorders and Psychosomatics

Mindfulness Therapy for Bodily Distress Syndrome – randomized trial, one-year follow-up, active control

Objective: To conduct a feasibility and efficacy trial of mindfulness therapy in somatization disorder and functional somatic syndromes such as fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, and chronic fatigue syndrome, defined as bodily distress syndrome (BDS)…

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References and related material:

1] Patients with medically unexplained symptoms and somatisation – a challenge for European health care systems: A white paper of the EACLPP Medically Unexplained Symptoms study group by Peter Henningsen and Francis Creed: http://www.eaclpp.org/working_groups.html
http://www.eaclpp.org/documents/Patientswithmedicallyunexplainedsymptomsandsomatisation_000.doc

2] Creed F, Guthrie E, Fink P, Henningsen P, Rief W, Sharpe M and White. Is there a better term than “Medically unexplained symptoms”? J Psychosom Res: Volume 68, Issue 1, Pages 5-8 January 2010) discusses the deliberations of the EACLPP MUS study group. Editorial also includes references to the DSM and ICD revision processes: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20004295

3] Fink P, Schröder A. One single diagnosis, bodily distress syndrome, succeeded to capture 10 diagnostic categories of functional somatic syndromes and somatoform disorders. J Psychosom Res. 2010 May;68(5):415-26. The Research Clinic for Functional Disorders and Psychosomatics, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000 Aarhus, Denmark:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20403500

Fink P, Toft T, Hansen MS, Ørnbøl E, Olesen F. Symptoms and syndromes of bodily distress: an exploratory study of 978 internal medical, neurological, and primary care patients. Psychosom Med. 2007 Jan;69(1):30-9.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17244846
Full text: http://www.psychosomaticmedicine.org/content/69/1/30.full

Fink P, Rosendal, M. Recent developments in the understanding and management of functional somatic symptoms in primary care. Current Opinion in Psychiatry 2008, 21:182–188

Rosendal M, Fink P, Falkoe E, Schou Hansen H, Olesen F. Improving the Classification of Medically Unexplained Symptoms in Primary Care. Eur. J. Psychiat. v.21 n.1 Zaragoza ene.-mar. 2007
Text: http://scielo.isciii.es/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0213-61632007000100004
PDF: http://scielo.isciii.es/pdf/ejpen/v21n1/improv3.pdf

4] EURASMUS  http://eurasmus.net/
The multidisciplinary European Research Association for Somatisation and Medically Unexplained Symptoms(EURASMUS) was formed to study the genetic, psychological and physiological mechanisms underlying bodily distress. Co-convenors: Francis Creed, Peter Henningsen

5] Notes from EACLPP Workgroup meeting in Budapest July 2011

EACLPP_WG_Medically_Unexplained_Symptoms_Budapest_2011

Report from Working group meeting on MUS/somatisation/bodily distress, Budapest July 1st 2011

“…We should find out whether the WHO group for classification of somatic distress and dissociative disorders will provide a better diagnostic system for these disorders.”

6] Article: ‘Heartsinks’ and weird symptoms by Tony Dowell, June 15, 2011.

Article Table: Functional somatic syndromes according to medical speciality:
http://www.nzdoctor.co.nz/media/671495/heartsinks.pdf

Changes to ICD-11 Beta drafting platform: Bodily Distress Disorders (1)

Changes to ICD-11 Beta drafting platform: Bodily Distress Disorders (1)

Post #190 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2jB


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This four page post is a revised version of content first published on July 2, 2012.

Information in this report relates to proposals for the World Health Organization’s forthcoming ICD-11, currently scheduled for pilot dissemination in 2015+; it does not relate to the existing ICD-10 or to the forthcoming US specific “clinical modification” of ICD-10, known as ICD-10-CM.

Caveat: The ICD-11 Beta drafting process is a work in progress over the next two to three years. The Beta draft is updated on a daily basis. Parent terms, category terms and sorting codes assigned to categories are subject to change as work on chapter reorganization progresses. Images and text in this posting may not reflect the most recently assigned categories and codes. This post reflects the Beta draft as it stood at July 24, 2012. Please also read the ICD-11 Beta Draft Caveats.

This report updates on recent changes to the Somatoform Disorders section of the ICD-11 Beta drafting platform. The Beta drafting platform can be accessed here:

Beta draft Foundation view:

http://apps.who.int/classifications/icd11/browse/f/en

Beta draft Linearization view:

http://apps.who.int/classifications/icd11/browse/l-m/en
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How do the Somatoform Disorders categories currently stand in ICD-10?

ICD-10 Tabular List Version: 2010 can be accessed here: http://apps.who.int/classifications/icd10/browse/2010/en

ICD-10 Chapter V “Somatoform Disorders”

This is the section of ICD-10 that corresponds with the Somatoform Disorders section in DSM-IV. There is a degree of correspondence between current categories for this section of ICD-10 and for DSM-IV, as set out in the (simplified) table, below.

For clinical descriptions and diagnostic guidelines for ICD-10 Somatoform Disorders see Page 129 of the “Blue book”:

ICD-10 Classification of Mental and Behavioural Disorders: Clinical descriptions and diagnostic guidelines: http://www.who.int/classifications/icd/en/bluebook.pdf

Current DSM-IV Codes and Categories for Somatoform Disorders and ICD-10 Chapter V Equivalents

[Ed: Neurasthenia is not categorized within DSM-IV.]

Source: Mayou R, Kirmayer LJ, Simon G, Kroenke K, Sharpe M: Somatoform disorders: time for a new approach in DSM-V. Am J Psychiat. 2005;162:847–855.
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This screenshot shows how the ICD-11 Beta draft had stood at June 24, 2012:

ICD-11 Beta Draft: Morbidity Linearization view


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For ICD-11 Beta draft, the proposal in June 2012 had been to rename ICD-10’s F45 Somatoform Disorders parent category to Bodily Distress Disorders.

Three new proposed terms: 9R0 Mild bodily distress disorder; 9R1 Moderate bodily distress disorder; 9R2 Severe bodily distress disorder were inserted above the 9R3 thru 9R8 legacy categories imported from ICD-10.

ID : http://who.int/icd#F45

05 Mental and behavioural disorders [Chapter V in ICD-10]

[…]

BODILY DISTRESS DISORDERS  [F45 Somatoform Disorders > F40-F48 Neurotic, stress-related and somatoform disorders in ICD-10]

9R0 Mild bodily distress disorder  [New term to ICD]
9R1 Moderate bodily distress disorder   [New term to ICD]
9R2 Severe bodily distress disorder  [New term to ICD]
9R3 Somatization disorder  [F45.0 in ICD-10]
9R4 Undifferentiated somatoform disorder  [F45.1 in ICD-10]
9R5 Somatoform autonomic dysfunction   [F45.3 in ICD-10]
9R6 Persistent somatoform pain disorder  [F45.4 in ICD-10] 
    ›  9R6.1 Persistent somatoform pain disorder
      9R6.2 Chronic pain disorder with somatic and psychological factors  [Not in ICD-10]
9R7 Other somatoform disorders  [F45.8 in ICD-10]
9R8 Somatoform disorder, unspecified  [F45.9 in ICD-10]

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Hypochondriacal disorder, coded at F45.2 in ICD-10, is currently renamed to Illness Anxiety Disorder for ICD-11 Beta draft and relocated under ANXIETY AND FEAR-RELATED DISORDERS:

http://apps.who.int/classifications/icd11/browse/l-m/en#/http%3a%2f%2fwho.int%2ficd%23F45.2

ID : http://who.int/icd#F45.2

9C5  ANXIETY AND FEAR-RELATED DISORDERS

      ›  9C5.6 Illness Anxiety Disorder

Continued on Page Two

DSM-5 Somatic Symptom Disorders: Differences between second and third draft for CSSD

DSM-5 Somatic Symptom Disorders: Differences between second and third draft for CSSD

Post #168 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-27y

A reminder that the third and final DSM-5 comment period closes on June 15 and that I am collating submissions on this site.

Comments are open to professional and lay stakeholders. Please alert clinicians, researchers, allied health professionals, social workers, lawyers, educationalists, therapists, patient advocacy groups to these proposals.

Full proposals, criteria and rationales for the Somatic Symptom Disorders are set out in this post:

DSM-5 proposals for Somatoform Disorders revised on April 27, 2012

According to DSM-5 Task Force Chair, David Kupfer, MD, “After the comment period closes, visitors will no longer be able to submit feedback through the site, and the site will not reflect any further revisions to the draft manual in anticipation of its publication in May 2013. However, the site will remain live and viewable.”

 

Somatic Symptom Disorders Work Group proposals:

Two PDF Disorder Descriptions and Rationale/Validity Propositions PDF documents had accompanied the first and second drafts. There are no revised PDFs reflecting the most recent proposals available on the DSM-5 Development website and the documents published with the second draft have been removed.

I have asked the APA’s Media and Communications Office to clarify whether the Somatic Symptom Disorder Work Group intends to publish revised Disorder Descriptions or Rationale/Validity Propositions documents during the life of the stakeholder review period or whether these documents are being dispensed with for this third draft.

Should updated documents be added to the site during the comment period I will post links.

 

Notes on differences between the second and third draft proposals for CSSD

As with the first and second drafts, the intention remains to rename the Somatoform Disorders section to Somatic Symptom Disorders.

The proposal continues to combine the existing DSM-IV categories:

Somatization Disorder
Hypochondriasis
Undifferentiated Somatoform Disorder
Pain Disorder

into a single new category, Somatic Symptom Disorder.

For the second draft, the work group had suggested two separate diagnoses, Complex Somatic Symptom Disorder CSSD) and Simple Somatic Symptom Disorder (SSSD).

Following evaluation of the results of the DSM-5 field trials, the Somatic Symptom Disorders Work Group has decided that Simple Somatic Symptom Disorder  is “a less severe variant of CSSD.”

The Work Group now proposes merging CSSD and SSSD into a single category called Somatic Symptom Disorder (SSD) and is suggesting dropping the word “Complex” from the category term.

The latest proposed category names for the revision of the DSM-IV’s Somatoform Disorders now look like this:

Somatic Symptom Disorders

J 00 Somatic Symptom Disorder – with the option for specifying:

Mild Somatic Symptom Disorder
Moderate Somatic Symptom Disorder
Severe Somatic Symptom Disorder

J 01 Illness Anxiety Disorder |
J 02 Conversion Disorder (Functional Neurological Symptom Disorder) |
J 03 Psychological Factors Affecting Medical Condition |
J 04 Factitious Disorder |
J 05 Somatic Symptom Disorder Not Elsewhere Classified |

Revised Criteria, Rationale and Severity texts for the above can be found at the links above or on this webpage:

http://www.dsm5.org/ProposedRevision/Pages/SomaticSymptomDisorders.aspx

These are the criteria for J00 Somatic Symptom Disorder

http://www.dsm5.org/ProposedRevision/Pages/proposedrevision.aspx?rid=368

J 00 Somatic Symptom Disorder

Updated April-27-2012

Proposed Revision

Somatic Symptom Disorder

Note that the criteria for CSSD in the previous draft, released in May 2011, had read:

“B. Excessive thoughts, feelings, and behaviors related to these somatic symptoms or associated health concerns: At least two of the following must be present.”

But for the third draft, this has been reduced to

“B. Excessive thoughts, feelings, and behaviors related to these somatic symptoms or associated health concerns: At least one of the following must be present.”

This is presumably to accommodate Simple Somatic Symptom Disorder within what had been the criteria for CSSD.

(Last year, for the second draft, the criteria for CSSD had required two from (1), (2) and (3) and a symptom duration of greater than 6 months, whereas the criteria for SSSD had required only one from (1), (2) and (3) and a symptom duration of greater than one month.)

 

Note also that the option for three Severity Specifiers for J00 Somatic Symptom Disorder category: Mild, Moderate, Severe, might potentially be intended to correspond to three newly proposed categories in the ICD-11 Chapter 5: Somatoform Disorders section.

In the ICD-11 Alpha drafting platform (which is a work in progress and comes with caveats), the Somatoform Disorders categories are currently proposed to be renamed to Bodily Distress Disorders. There are three new categories listed:

6R0 Mild bodily distress disorder
6R1 Moderate bodily distress disorder
6R2 Severe bodily distress disorder

These three new category suggestions have no definitions or descriptive parameters visible in the ICD-11 Alpha draft so it isn’t possible to determine at this stage what disorders these newly suggested terms might be intended to capture; nor how they would relate to the existing somatoform disorders categories that still remain listed beneath them in this section of the Alpha draft.

For comparison, this is how the corresponding section of ICD-11 categories currently displays:

ICD-11 Alpha draft:

BODILY DISTRESS DISORDERS [Formerly Somatoform Disorders]

6R0 Mild bodily distress disorder
6R1 Moderate bodily distress disorder
6R2 Severe bodily distress disorder
6R3 Somatization disorder
6R4 Undifferentiated somatoform disorder
6R5 Somatoform autonomic dysfunction
6R6 Persistent somatoform pain disorder
     6R6.1 Persistent somatoform pain disorder
     6R6.2 Chronic pain disorder with somatic and psychological factors [not in ICD-10]
6R7 Other somatoform disorders
6R8 Somatoform disorder, unspecified

Hypochondriacal disorder [ICD-10: F45.2] is currently listed in ICD-11 Chapter 5 as Illness Anxiety Disorder under 6L5 ANXIETY AND FEAR-RELATED DISORDERS > 6L5.6 Illness Anxiety Disorder.

Dissociative (Conversion disorders) [ICD-10: F44] is currently listed in ICD-11 Chapter 5 under Neurotic, stress-related and somatoform disorders > 7A5 Dissociative [conversion] disorders.

There had been discussions by the SSD and Dissociative Disorders work groups for potentially locating Conversion Disorder under the DSM-5 Dissociative Disorders section, for congruency with its location within ICD-10.

For the third draft, it appears that the groups with oversight of the revision of conversion disorder have decided that this category should be renamed to Conversion Disorder (Functional Neurological Symptom Disorder) and classified as a Somatic Symptom Disorder.

In a future post, for ease of comparison, I will post a table comparing DSM-5 third draft proposals with current listings for ICD-11.

 

Links:

1] Somatic Symptom Disorders Third draft proposals:
http://www.dsm5.org/ProposedRevision/Pages/SomaticSymptomDisorders.aspx

2] Bodily Distress Disorders” to replace “Somatoform Disorders” for ICD-11?
http://wp.me/pKrrB-1Vx

3] DSM-5 proposals for Somatoform Disorders revised on April 27, 2012
http://wp.me/pKrrB-24D

4] Submissions to SSD Work Group May 2011 are archived here:
http://wp.me/PKrrB-19a

5] Submissions to SSD Work Group May 2012 are being collated here:
http://wp.me/PKrrB-1Ol

APA Press Release: DSM-5 Draft Criteria Open for Public Comment

APA Press Release: DSM-5 Draft Criteria Open for Public Comment

Post #164 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-20I

Commentaries and media, followed by APA Press Release No. 24

(Not specific to DSM-5 third draft: Ethics complaints filed against APA.)

Psychology Today

Science Isn’t Golden
Matters of the mind and heart

Patients Harmed by Diagnosis Find Their Voices
Victims of psychiatric labeling file ethics complaints.

Paula J. Caplan, Ph.D. | April 28, 2012

The American Psychiatric Association’s 2012 Annual Meeting

This coverage is not sanctioned by, nor a part of, the American Psychiatric Association.

From Medscape Medical News > Conference News
DSM-5 Field Trial Results a Hot Topic at APA 2012 Meeting

Deborah Brauser | May 3, 2012

May 3, 2012 — Telepsychiatry, neuromodulation, the role of genetics, and updates for the upcoming Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) are just some of the hot items on the agenda of this year’s American Psychiatric Association’s 2012 Annual Meeting in Philadelphia…

(Not specific to DSM-5 third draft: Letter, AJP re DSM-5 field trial reliability and kappas.)

American Journal of Psychiatry

Letters to the Editor | May 01, 2012
Standards for DSM-5 Reliability

Am J Psychiatry 2012;169:537-537. 10.1176/appi.ajp.2012.12010083

Robert L. Spitzer, M.D.; Janet B.W. Williams, Ph.D.; Jean Endicott, Ph.D.
Princeton, N.J.
New York City

DSM5 in Distress
The DSM’s impact on mental health practice and research.

DSM 5 Rejects ‘Hebephilia’ Except for the Fine Print

Alan Frances MD | May 3, 2012

Scientific American blogs

APA Announces New Changes to Drafts of the DSM-5, Psychiatry’s New “Bible”

Ferris Jabr | May 3, 2012

Observations

Opinion, arguments & analyses from the editors of Scientific American

“…This year, the APA is holding its annual meeting from May 5 to 9 in Philadelphia, where much of the discussion will focus on the drafts of the DSM-5 and the results of “Field Trials”—dry runs of the new diagnostic criteria in clinical settings. I am attending the conference to learn more and, next week, my colleague Ingrid Wickelgren at Scientific American MIND and I will bring you a series of blogs about the DSM-5 authored by ourselves and some well-known researchers and psychiatrists. For the duration of next week, we will also publish my feature article about DSM-5 in its entirety on our website. After next week, you can still read the feature in the May/June issue of MIND. Stay tuned!”

About the Author: Ferris Jabr is an associate editor focusing on neuroscience and psychology.

1 boring old man

1 boring old man | May 3, 2012

the future of an illusion IV½…

and

the future of an illusion IV

1 boring old man | May 2, 2012

Psychology Today | DSM 5 in Distress

Wonderful News: DSM 5 Finally Begins Its Belated and Necessary Retreat
Perhaps this will be the beginning of real reform.

Alan Frances MD | May 2, 2012

MindFreedom International Newswire

Protesters, Rejecting Mental Illness Labels, Vow to “Occupy” the American Psychiatric Association Convention

MindFreedom International
Last modified: 2012-05-01T16:46:46Z
Published: Tuesday, May. 1, 2012 – 9:46 am

PHILADELPHIA, May 1, 2012 — /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — On Saturday, May 5, 2012, as thousands of psychiatrists congregate for the American Psychiatric Association (APA) Annual Meeting, individuals with psychiatric labels and others will converge in a global campaign to oppose the APA’s proposed new edition of its “bible,” the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), scheduled for publication in 2013. Occupy the APA will include distinguished speakers from 10 a.m. to noon at Friends Center (1515 Cherry Street, Philadelphia), and a march at approximately 12:15 p.m. to the Pennsylvania Convention Center (12th and Arch Streets), where the group will protest from approximately 1 p.m. while the APA meets inside…

http://www.psychiatry.org/advocacy–newsroom/newsroom/dsm-5-draft-criteria-open-for-public-comment

Wed May 02, 2012

Contact: For Immediate Release                                  
Eve Herold, 703-907- 8640 Release No. 24
press@psych.org
Erin Connors, 703-907-8562
econnors@psych.org

DSM-5 Draft Criteria Open for Public Comment
Mental health diagnostic manual available for final online comment period

ARLINGTON, Va. (May 2, 2012) – For a third and final time, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) invites public comment on the proposed criteria for the upcoming fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). DSM is the handbook used by health care professionals as an authoritative guide to the diagnosis of mental disorders.

The public comment period will last six weeks, beginning May 2 and continuing until June 15. All responses submitted via the DSM-5 website will be considered by the DSM-5 Work Groups, which are charged with assessing the latest scientific evidence and recommending the disorder definitions and criteria to be included in the manual. Nearly 10,800 comments from health care professionals, mental health advocates, families and consumers were submitted in the first two public comment periods in 2010 and 2011.

“The comments we have received over the past two years have helped sharpen our focus, not only on the strongest research and clinical evidence to support DSM-5 criteria but on the real-world implications of these changes,” said APA President John M. Oldham, M.D. “We appreciate the public’s interest and continued participation in the DSM-5 development process.”

In preparation for this final comment period, members of the DSM-5 Task Force and Work Groups have updated their proposals for diagnostic criteria. The revised criteria reflect recently published research, results from DSM-5 field testing of the criteria and public comments received since 2010.

Key changes posted for this round of public review include:

Revised proposals to place Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome and Mixed Anxiety Depressive Disorder in Section III of the manual, covering conditions that require further research before their consideration as formal disorders

 Added language to Major Depressive Disorder criteria to help differentiate between normal bereavement associated with a significant loss and a diagnosis of a mental disorder

Added rationale for changes to Personality Disorders, with field trial data now supporting the reliability of dimensional measures and the categorical diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder

Modified diagnostic criteria for Pedophilic Disorder to make the category more consistent with the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Diseases

Condensed diagnoses within Communication Disorders to only include Language Disorders and Speech Disorders

A proposal for a new diagnosis of Suicidal Behavioral Disorder

Modified diagnostic criteria for numerous disorders, including some in the Neurocognitive Disorders and Anxiety Disorders chapters

A proposed Cultural Formulation Interview, which includes specific questions to help clinicians more effectively assess cultural aspects of psychiatric diagnosis

A detailed list of changes made to draft proposals since July 2011 can be found on www.DSM5.org .

Revisions to DSM reflect scientific advances in the field and new knowledge gained since the last manual was published in 1994. Since 1999, more than 500 mental health and medical researchers and clinicians from the United States and abroad have been involved in the planning, review and deliberations for DSM-5. Field trials in both large academic medical centers and routine clinical practices have tested select criteria.

Feedback to the proposed diagnostic criteria can be submitted through www.DSM5.org , which will be available until the comment period ends June 15. After that, the site will remain viewable but will be closed to comments as the Work Groups and Task Force complete revisions and submit criteria for evaluation by the Scientific Review Committee and the Clinical and Public Health Committee. The Task Force will then make final recommendations to the APA Board of Trustees. The final version of DSM-5 is expected to go before the Board of Trustees in December 2012.

“As with every stage in this thorough development process, DSM-5 is benefiting from a depth of research, expertise and diverse opinion that will ultimately strengthen the final document,” noted David J. Kupfer, M.D., chair of the DSM-5 Task Force.

Publication of DSM-5 is expected in May 2013.

The American Psychiatric Association is a national medical specialty society whose physician members specialize in the diagnosis, treatment, prevention and research of mental illnesses, including substance use disorders. Visit the APA at www.psychiatry.org  and www.HealthyMinds.org .

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