ICD-10-CM Release for 2014 now available

Post #270 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-3iT

ICD-10-CM Release for 2014 now available

Prior to implementation, the codes in ICD-10-CM are not valid for any purpose or use.

The World Health Organization’s (WHO) International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) was published in 1992 and is used in over a hundred countries worldwide.

A number of countries have been authorized by WHO to develop “Clinical Modifications” – adaptations of ICD-10 for country specific use. These differ in the number of chapters, codes and subcategories. Specific conditions are present in some adaptations but not all clinical modifications [1]. All modifications to the ICD-10 must conform to WHO conventions for ICD.

Canada uses an adaptation called ICD-10-CA, Australia uses ICD-10-AM, Germany uses ICD-10-GM and Thailand uses ICD-10-TM.

The U.S. lags behind most of the rest of the world and is still using a Clinical Modification of the WHO’s long since retired, ICD-9.

A U.S. specific adaptation of ICD-10 has been under development for a considerable length of time but is scheduled for implementation on October 1, 2014.

Transition to ICD-10-CM is required for everyone covered by the Health Insurance Portability Accountability Act (HIPAA).

Implementation schedules for Large Practices; Small and Medium Practices; Small Hospitals and Payers can be found on the CMS website, here: Implementation Timelines.

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2014 release of ICD-10-CM

The 2014 release of ICD-10-CM is now available from the CDC website. It replaces the July 2012 release.

Prior to the implementation date of October 1, 2014, the codes in ICD-10-CM are not valid for any purpose or use.

The ICD-10-CM code set is currently subject to partial code freeze. For information on the code freeze see Partial Freeze of Revisions to ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM/PCS.

October 1, 2011 was the last major update of ICD-10-CM/PCS until October 1, 2015. Between October 1, 2011 and October 1, 2015, revisions to ICD-10-CM/PCS will be for new diseases/new technology procedures or minor revisions to correct any reported errors in these classifications. Regular (at least annual) updates to ICD-10-CM/PCS will resume on October 1, 2015.

Information on the ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM/PCS update and revision processes and the public NCHS/CDC Coordination and Maintenance Committee meetings can be found on this CDC page: Coordination and Maintenance Committee.

Downloading the ICD-10-CM code sets

The ICD-10-CM Preface, Guidelines, Tabular List, Index and associated documentation can be downloaded from this page: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/icd/icd10cm.htm#10update.

The PDF of the Preface is in a single PDF file here: ICD-10-CM Preface 2014

The PDF of the Guidelines is in a single PDF file here: ICD-10-CM Guidelines

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To access the PDFs for the ICD-10-CM Tabular List and Index, the files need extracting from Zip files from this link:

ICD-10-CM List of codes and Descriptions (updated 7/3/2013)

( ftp://ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/Publications/ICD10CM/2014/ )

Select this file, below, on the CDC site and open it. It is a large file of over 15MB so you will need to allow sufficient time for it to fully load:

06/19/2013 08:28AM 15,223,965 ICD10CM_FY2014_Full_PDF.zip

It will unpack these five PDF files, which can be opened and viewed in situ or saved:

ICD10CM_FY2014_Full_PDF_DIndex  4,222 KB  [ICD-10-CM INDEX TO DISEASES and INJURIES]

or open unzipped PDF on Dx Revision Watch: ICD-10-CM 2014 Full Index

ICD10CM_FY2014_Full_PDF_EIndex   [401 KB]  [ICD-10-CM External Cause of Injuries Index]

ICD10CM_FY2014_Full_PDF_TableOfDrugs   [2,193 KB]

ICD10CM_FY2014_Full_PDF_TableOfNeoplasms   [646 KB]

ICD10CM_FY2014_Full_PDF_Tabular   [7, 398 KB]  [ICD-10-CM TABULAR LIST of DISEASES and INJURIES]

or open unzipped PDF on Dx Revision Watch: ICD-10-CM Tabular List

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For five PDF files of Addenda go to this page:

ftp://ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/Publications/ICD10CM/2014/

and select this file:

06/19/2013 08:28AM 582,584 ICD10CM_FY2014_Addenda.zip

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Comparison between classifications and codings in ICD-10-CM and ICD-10

The WHO’s ICD-10 Volume 1 The Tabular List isn’t made available as a PDF file but can be accessed on a searchable electronic browser platform here: ICD-10 Version: 2010.

The Tabular List for ICD-10 contains more textual descriptions for the categories in Chapter V (the mental and behavioural disorders chapter) than other chapters in ICD-10.

There are also two “speciality” volumes for ICD-10 Chapter V for Clinical descriptions and diagnostic guidelines (known as the “Blue Book”) and Diagnostic criteria for research (known as the “Green Book”).

The U.S. specific ICD-10-CM will not contain this depth of textual content within its Chapter 5.

CDC’s, Donna Picket, has confirmed that CMS/CDC does not plan to adapt the “Blue Book” specifically for U.S. use in conjunction with Chapter 5 of ICD-10-CM [2]. Nor are there plans for an official CMS/CDC crosswalk between ICD-10-CM’s Chapter 5 classifications and codes and those in ICD-10 Chapter V [3].

In the U.S., since 2003, the ICD-9-CM diagnostic codes have been mandated for third-party billing and reporting by HIPAA for all electronic transactions for billing and reimbursement. Following implementation on October 1, 2014, the ICD-10-CM codes sets will become mandatory.

This also applies to the coding of mental and behavioural disorders. APA’s DSM-IV disorder diagnoses are crosswalked to ICD-9-CM codes, or their nearest equivalent, for billing and reimbursement.

The DSM-5, published in May this year, includes the crosswalk codes for both the existing ICD-9-CM and the forthcoming ICD-10-CM codes.

For comparison between

ICD-10-CM Chapter 5 Mental, Behavioral and Neurodevelopmental disorders (F01-F99)

and ICD-10 Chapter V Mental and behavioural disorders (F00-F99) see the ICD-10 online browser or

The ICD-10 Classification of Mental and Behavioural Disorders Clinical descriptions and diagnostic guidelines (The “Blue Book”)

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References and further resources

1. The development, evolution, and modifications of ICD-10: challenges to the international comparability of morbidity data. Jetté N, Quan H, Hemmelgarn B, Drosler S, Maass C, Moskal L, Paoin W, Sundararajan V, Gao S, Jakob R, Ustün B, Ghali WA; IMECCHI Investigators. Med Care. 2010 Dec;48(12):1105-10. doi: 10.1097/MLR.0b013e3181ef9d3e [PMID: 20978452].

The development, evolution and modifications of ICD-10: challenges to the international comparability of morbidity data: Nathalie Jetté MD, November 2009, Slide Presentation [5 MB].

2. Personal communication.

3. Personal communication.

4. Information for providers, payers and vendors on transition to ICD-10-CM can be found here on the CMS website.

5. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services: ICD-10-CM/PCS MYTHS AND FACTS ICN 902143, April 2013.

6. American Psychological Association: Nine frequently asked questions about DSM-5 and ICD-10-CM, APA Practice staff answer questions about billing, determining diagnoses and more related to the two diagnostic classification systems. Practice Update, May 16, 2013.

7. American Psychiatric Association: Insurance Implications of DSM-5

8. AAPC What is ICD-9-CM?

Practice Central on ICD-10-CM transition; APA Monitor and WHO Reed on ICD-11

Two articles on forthcoming classification systems: the first on ICD-10-CM from Practice Central; the second on ICD-11 from the February 2012 edition of the American Psychological Association’s “Monitor on Psychology”

Post #140 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-1Tt

Update: Medicare could delay burdensome rules on doctors | Julian Pecquet, for The Hill, February 14, 2012

“The acting head of the Medicare agency said Tuesday that she is considering giving the nation’s doctors more time to switch to a new insurance coding system that critics say would cost millions of dollars for little gain to patients.

“Marilyn Tavenner, the acting administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, told a conference of the American Medical Association (AMA) that her agency could delay adoption of the so-called ICD-10 system. Current law calls for physicians to adopt the new codes next year…

“…Speaking to reporters after her prepared remarks, Tavenner said her office would formally announce its intention to craft new regulations “within the next few days.”

ICD-10 Deadline Review Update | Andrea Kraynak, for HealthLeaders Media, February 15, 2012

“Big news regarding the ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation timeline came Tuesday morning during the American Medical Association (AMA) National Advocacy Conference in Washington, DC.”

“Per CMS acting administrator Marilyn Tavenner, CMS plans to revisit the current implementation deadline of October 1, 2013. Tavenner said CMS wants to reexamine the pace of implementing ICD-10 and reduce physicians’ administrative burden, according to an AMA tweet…”

Practice Central: Resources for Practicing Psychologists

Practice Central, a service of the APA Practice Organization (APAPO), supports practicing psychologists in all settings and at all stages of their career. APAPO is a companion organization to the American Psychological Association. Our mission is to advance and protect your ability to practice psychology.

http://www.apapracticecentral.org/update/2012/02-09/transition.aspx

Practice Update | February 2012

Transition to the ICD-10-CM: What does it mean for psychologists?

Psychologists should be aware of and prepare for the mandatory shift to ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes in October 2013

By Practice Research and Policy staff

February 9, 2012—Beginning October 1, 2013 all entities, including health care providers, covered by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) must convert to using the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code sets. The mandate represents a fundamental shift for many psychologists and other mental health professionals who are far more attuned to the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM).

Most psychologists were trained using some version of DSM. For other health care providers, the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) – which contains a chapter on mental disorders – is the classification standard.

Over the years, efforts to harmonize these two classifications have resulted in systems with similar (often identical) codes and diagnostic names. In fact, even if psychologists record DSM diagnostic codes for billing purposes, payers recognize the codes as ICD-9-CM – the official version of ICD currently used in the United States. Since 2003, the ICD-9-CM diagnostic codes have been mandated for third-party billing and reporting by HIPAA for all…

Read full article here

 

Dr Geoffrey M. Reed, PhD, Senior Project Officer, WHO Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, is seconded to WHO through IUPsyS (International Union for Psychological Science). Dr Reed co-ordinates the International Advisory Group for the Revision of ICD-10 Mental and Behavioural Disorders.

Meetings of the International Advisory Group are chaired by Steven Hyman, MD, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, a former Director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and DSM-5 Task Force Member.

The Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse will also be managing the technical part of the revision of Diseases of the Nervous System (currently Chapter VI), as it is doing for Chapter V.

February 2012 edition of the American Psychological Association’s “Monitor on Psychology”:

http://www.apa.org/monitor/2012/02/disorder-classification.aspx

Feature

Improving disorder classification, worldwide

With the help of psychologists, the next version of the International Classification of Diseases will have a more behavioral perspective.

By Rebecca A. Clay

February 2012, Vol 43, No. 2

Print version: page 40

What’s the world’s most widely used classification system for mental disorders? If you guessed the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), you would be wrong.

According to a study of nearly 5,000 psychiatrists in 44 countries sponsored by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Psychiatric Association, more than 70 percent of the world’s psychiatrists use WHO’s International Classification of Diseases (ICD) most in day-to-day practice while just 23 percent turn to the DSM. The same pattern is found among psychologists globally, according to preliminary results from a similar survey of international psychologists conducted by WHO and the International Union of Psychological Science.

“The ICD is the global standard for health information,” says psychologist Geoffrey M. Reed, PhD, senior project officer in WHO’s Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse. “It’s developed as a tool for the public good; it’s not the property of a particular profession or particular professional organization.”

Now WHO is revising the ICD, with the ICD-11 due to be approved in 2015. With unprecedented input from psychologists, the revised version’s section on mental and behavioral disorders is expected to be more psychologist-friendly than ever—something that’s especially welcome given concerns being raised about the DSM’s own ongoing revision process. (See “Protesting proposed changes to the DSM” .) And coming changes in the United States will mean that psychologists will soon need to get as familiar with the ICD as their colleagues around the world…

Read full article here

For more information about the ICD revision, visit the World Health Organization.

Rebecca A. Clay is a writer in Washington, D.C

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