HHS issue Final Rule: ICD-10-CM compliance deadline set for October 1, 2015

Post #314 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-3ZI

CMS Press Release:  Final Rule July 31, 2014

Coding industry and professional body reaction

ICD-10 Testing: Final rule overshadows CMS testing plans

ICD10 Watch | Carl Natale | August 2, 2014

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Debunking Myths and Misperceptions of ICD-10 – Journal of AHIMA illustrates why it’s time for 10

AHIMA | News Release | July 30, 2014

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DHHS final rule on ICD-10 delay ready for publication

ICD10Watch | Carl Natale | July 31, 2014

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CMS Confirms ICD-10 Deadline

Health Leaders Media | Michelle Leppert | August 1, 2014

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ICD-10 Final Rule Released, October 2015 Official Compliance Deadline

Journal of AHIMA | Mary Butler | July 31, 2014

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ICD-10 Final Rule Stirs Angst, Apprehension

ICD10 Monitor | Chuck Buck | August 1, 2014

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(From June 12, 2014)

SNOMED, ICD-11 Not Feasible Alternatives to ICD-10-CM/PCS Implementation

AHIMA | Sue Bowman | June 12, 2014

“For the US, [2017] is the beginning, not the end, of the process toward adoption of ICD-11.”

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Resources

Federal Register: HHS ICD-10-CM Compliance FINAL RULE

[PDF] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, Office of the Secretary
45 CFR Part 162 [CMS-0043-F] RIN 0938-AS31
Administrative Simplification: Change to the Compliance Date for the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD–10–CM and ICD-10-PCS) Medical Data Code Sets

CMS Press Release:  Final Rule July 31, 2014

CMS NEWS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE    Contact: CMS Media Relations

July 31, 2014                                   (202) 690-6145 or press@cms.hhs.gov

 

Deadline for ICD-10 allows health care industry ample time to prepare for change

Deadline set for October 1, 2015

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a rule today finalizing Oct. 1, 2015 as the new compliance date for health care providers, health plans, and health care clearinghouses to transition to ICD-10, the tenth revision of the International Classification of Diseases. This deadline allows providers, insurance companies and others in the health care industry time to ramp up their operations to ensure their systems and business processes are ready to go on Oct. 1, 2015.

The ICD-10 codes on a claim are used to classify diagnoses and procedures on claims submitted to Medicare and private insurance payers. By enabling more detailed patient history coding, ICD-10 can help to better coordinate a patient’s care across providers and over time. ICD-10 improves quality measurement and reporting, facilitates the detection and prevention of fraud, waste, and abuse, and leads to greater accuracy of reimbursement for medical services. The code set’s granularity will improve data capture and analytics of public health surveillance and reporting, national quality reporting, research and data analysis, and provide detailed data to enhance health care delivery. Health care providers and specialty groups in the United States provided extensive input into the development of ICD-10, which includes more detailed codes for the conditions they treat and reflects advances in medicine and medical technology.

“ICD-10 codes will provide better support for patient care, and improve disease management, quality measurement and analytics,” said Marilyn Tavenner, Administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). “For patients under the care of multiple providers, ICD-10 can help promote care coordination.”

Using ICD-10, doctors can capture much more information, meaning they can better understand important details about the patient’s health than with ICD-9-CM. Moreover, the level of detail that is provided for by ICD-10 means researchers and public health officials can better track diseases and health outcomes. ICD-10 reflects improved diagnosis of chronic illness and identifies underlying causes, complications of disease, and conditions that contribute to the complexity of a disease. Additionally, ICD-10 captures the severity and stage of diseases such as chronic kidney disease, diabetes, and asthma.

The previous revision, ICD-9-CM, contains outdated, obsolete terms that are inconsistent with current medical practice, new technology and preventive services.

ICD-10 represents a significant change that impacts the entire health care community. As such, much of the industry has already invested resources toward the implementation of ICD-10. CMS has implemented a comprehensive testing approach, including end-to-end testing in 2015, to help ensure providers are ready. While many providers, including physicians, hospitals, and health plans, have completed the necessary system changes to transition to ICD-10, the time offered by Congress and this rule ensure all providers are ready.

For additional information about ICD-10, please visit: http://www.cms.gov/ICD10

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American Psychiatric Association launches new pages for DSM-5 – DSM-5 to cost $199

American Psychiatric Association (APA) launches new pages for DSM-5 – DSM-5 to cost $199

Post #220 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2CD

Unless you’ve had your head stuck in a bucket this last three years, you’ll be aware that the next edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s diagnostic manual is slated for release this May.

APA has spent $25 million on the development of DSM-5.

DSM-5 will be published by American Psychiatric Publishing Inc. and planned for release at the APA’s 166th Annual Meeting in San Francisco (May 18-22).

A hardback copy is going to set you back $199, though paid up members of the American Psychiatric Association are being offered a discount.

Psychiatrists, psychologists, primary health care physicians, therapists, counselors, social workers and allied health professionals don’t have to use DSM-5.

Instead, when codes are required they can use the codes in Chapter 5 of ICD-9-CM (Mental Disorders) and Chapter 5 of ICD-10-CM (Mental, Behavioral and Neurodevelopmental disorders), when ICD-10-CM is implemented*.

*Effective implementation date for ICD-10-CM (and ICD-10-PCS) is currently October 1, 2014. Until that time the codes in ICD-10-CM are not valid for any purpose or use.

Image Copyright Dx Revision Watch 2013

Don’t like it? Don’t use it. Use ICD codes instead.

Since 2003, ICD-9-CM diagnostic codes have been mandated for third-party billing and reporting by HIPAA for all electronic transactions for billing and reimbursement. The codes in DSM are crosswalked to ICD codes.

So you can use ICD-9-CM codes.

And when ICD-10-CM is implemented, it isn’t going to cost you a cent – it will be freely available on the internet.

The ICD-10-CM draft, currently subject to partial code freeze, and its associated documentation can be accessed here on the CDC site; so you can already have a poke around:

International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM)

On January 23, Allen Frances, MD, who had oversight of the Task Force that developed DSM-IV had this to say about the $199 manual:

Price Gouging: Why Will DSM-5 Cost $199 a Copy?

 

APA launches new pages for DSM-5

Last week the APA launched new pages to promote DSM-5.

Report by John Gever for Medpage Today:

Psych Group Posts Glimpses of Final DSM-5

John Gever, Senior Editor, MedPage Today | January 21, 2013

Peeks into the final DSM-5, the controversial new edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s diagnostic manual, are now available from the group prior to the guide’s official May 22 debut…

PR piece by Mark Moran for Psychiatric News, organ of the American Psychiatric Association:

Psychiatric News | January 18, 2013
Volume 48 Number 2 page 1-6
10.1176/appi.pn.2013.1b10
American Psychiatric Association
Professional News

Continuity and Changes Mark New Text of DSM-5

Mark Moran

The DSM-5 Task Force chair discusses conceptual themes driving changes to the new manual. This is the first in a series continuing through May that will summarize the diagnostic and organizational differences between DSM-IV and DSM-5.

DSM-5, approved by the APA Board of Trustees in December, reflects the “state of the clinical science” in psychiatric diagnosis, incorporating important findings from genetic, neurobiological, and treatment research, while also maintaining substantial continuity for maximum clinical utility…

Go here for the DSM-5 Collection.

Psychiatric News Alert, where those not intending to boycott DSM-5 are encouraged to explore and pre-order a copy ($199):

Psychiatric News Alert

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

New DSM-5 Series Includes Supplementary Information; Order Your Manual Now!

The new DSM-5 pages can be found here, with articles, fact sheets and videos:

http://www.psychiatry.org/dsm5

Documents include:

DSM-5 Table of Contents  [Lists disorder sections and the categories that sit under them.]

Changes to DSM-5

Continuity and Changes Mark New Text of DSM-5, Psychiatric News, January 18, 2013

Highlights of Changes from DSM-IV-TR to DSM-5
DSM-5 Provides New Take on Developmental Disorders, Psychiatric News, January 18, 2013

DSM-5 Fact Sheets

From Planning to Publication: Developing DSM-5
The People Behind DSM-5
The Organization of DSM-5

Making a Case for New Disorders
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Specific Learning Disorder
Intellectual Disability
Social Communication Disorder
Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

DSM-5 Video Series

How and why was DSM-5 developed?
What has been the goal for revising DSM-5?

What are the changes to autism spectrum disorder in DSM-5?
What will be the impact of DSM-5 changes to autism spectrum disorder?
What are the changes to learning disorder in DSM-5?
What will be the impact of the revised specific learning disorder diagnosis?

The APA’s DSM-5 Development site can still be found here DSM-5 Development.

Proposals for changes to DSM-IV categories and criteria, as they had stood at the third draft, were frozen on June 15, 2012.

Any revisions made to criteria sets following closure of the third and final comment period are subject to embargo and the DSM-5 Development site has not been updated to reflect changes made to categories and criteria beyond June 15.

The entire third draft of proposals was removed from the DSM-5 Development site on November 15.

You can read APA’s rationale for removing the draft on an updated Permissions, Licensing & Reprints page.

Summary: September 19 ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee Meeting

Summary: September 19 ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee Meeting

Post #205 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2vc  

The September meeting of the ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee, jointly chaired by CMS and CDC, took place on September 19, 2012.

For further information on this public process see the CDC website page:

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/icd/icd9cm_maintenance.htm

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Meeting Summary document

The meeting Summary document has now been published.  The audio is not yet available.

The Summary document can be downloaded here:

September 19, 2012

Summary (10 pages) [PDF – 59 KB]

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/icd9/2012_September_Summary.pdf

or opened in PDF format here:     Summary September 19 2012

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The Proposals and Agenda document can be downloaded here:

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/icd/icd9cm_maintenance.htm#meeting_materials

ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee Meeting

September 19, 2012

Proposals (74 pages) [PDF – 730 KB]

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/icd9/Topic_packet_for_September_19_2012.pdf

or opened in PDF format here:     Topic packet for September 19 2012

According to the Summary document, the deadline for receipt of public comments on proposals submitted at this meeting is November 16, 2012. If there is any change to this date, I will update.

Comments on proposals presented at the ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee meeting should be sent to the following email address: nchsicd9CM@cdc.gov. See Page One of the Summary document for important information on submission of public comment.

Extract, Summary document

Chronic fatigue syndrome

Andreas Kogelnik, MD, representing the Coalition 4 ME/CFS, was available via telephone to address questions and clinical concerns.

Lori Chapo-Kroger, representing the Coalition 4 ME/CFS, expressed that many nations, and the World Health Organization, put CFS at G93 in ICD-10, and that this would include everyone but the U.S.

Mary Dimmock, representing the Coalition 4 ME/CFS, questioned why the change must wait until after 2014 when they feel that this is an error in the classification right now (and has been since 2001).

Dr. Kogelnik indicated that the term myalgic encephalomyelitis is used in Europe while the U.S. continues to use the term chronic fatigue syndrome, and that the Coalition 4 ME/CFS considers these two conditions (CFS and ME) to be the same. That is why they want both terms included in the same code.

Nelly Leon-Chisen, AHA, noted support for a need for a code for chronic fatigue syndrome distinct from chronic fatigue, unspecified. She indicated also that with the cause being unknown it is better that the classification not be locked into placing CFS as a viral code. Also, if there is no consensus for ME and CFS being the same then it makes sense to keep them as two separate codes. If research later develops that says they are the same then the data can be aggregated together. However, if the research does not show this, then you don’t have them lumped into one code that does not allow you to separate out one from the other.

Sue Bowman, AHIMA, questioned counting all CFS as following a virus infection. She expressed a need for clinical consensus on this condition. Also, she stated that she did not see a rationale for an early change (before 2014).

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Note: Dx Revision Watch has no connection with the Coalition 4 ME/CFS or with the development of any proposals submitted by this organization. The views and opinions expressed in Coalition 4 ME/CFS submissions to ICD-9-CM  Coordination and Maintenance Committee meetings represent the views of the Coalition 4 ME/CFS and its representatives and not the views of Dx Revision Watch.

All enquiries about proposals submitted to CMS/CDC on behalf of the Coalition 4 ME/CFS should be addressed directly to the Coalition 4 ME/CFS.

Note also that the proposal from the Coalition 4 ME/CFS (Option 1) and the alternative proposal presented by CMS/CDC (Option 2) at the September meeting are set out in accordance with the requirements of the ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee for the submission of proposals. 

For Options 1 and Option 2 see post Proposals: September 19 ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee Meeting or Proposals document Topic packet for September 19 2012

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Related posts:

Proposals: September 19 ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee Meeting

Coding CFS in ICD-10-CM: CFSAC and the Coalition4ME/CFS initiative

Extracts: ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee Meeting Summary document (CFS coding)

Extracts: ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee Meeting September 14, 2011 (Coding of CFS in ICD-10-CM)

Proposals: September 19 ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee Meeting

Proposals: September 19 ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee Meeting

Post #204 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2uL

The next meeting of the ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee, which is jointly chaired by CMS and CDC, takes place on September 19, 2012. 

There is a very full agenda for this meeting. The meeting materials Proposals document has now been published.

For further information on this public process see the CDC website page:

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/icd/icd9cm_maintenance.htm

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The Proposals and Agenda document can be downloaded here:

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/icd/icd9cm_maintenance.htm#meeting_materials

ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee Meeting

September 19, 2012

Proposals (74 pgs) [PDF – 730 KB]

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/icd9/Topic_packet_for_September_19_2012.pdf

or opened in PDF format here:      Topic packet for September 19 2012

Note: I have no connection with the Coalition 4 ME/CFS or with the development of any proposals submitted by this organization. All enquiries about the proposal submitted to CMS/CDC on behalf of the Coalition 4 ME/CFS should be addressed directly to the Coalition 4 ME/CFS.

Note also that the proposal from the Coalition 4 ME/CFS and the alternative proposal from CMS/CDC are set out in accordance with the requirements of the ICD-9-CM C & M Committee for the submission of proposals.

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Coding of CFS in the forthcoming US specific ICD-10-CM

At the ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee’s September 14, 2011 meeting, a presentation had been made on behalf of the Coalition 4 ME/CFS in relation to the formal submission of a proposal.

The proposal requested that consideration be given to moving the classification of Chronic fatigue syndrome from its current proposed location within the ICD-10-CM R code chapter (Chapter 18: Symptoms and signs) to the G code chapter (Chapter 6: Diseases of the nervous system).

This would bring the chapter location of Chronic fatigue syndrome in ICD-10-CM in line with the international version of ICD-10, the Canadian ICD-10-CA and proposals for the forthcoming ICD-11.

No NCHS decision reached in response to the September 2011 proposals and the public comments received in respect of these proposals was conveyed following closure of the public comment period, last November.

However, further discussion of Chronic fatigue syndrome and two additional proposals are tabled on the agenda for discussion at the September 19, meeting, tomorrow.

I am appending the relevant extract from the Diagnosis Agenda and Proposals document which was published on the CDC  website overnight. An official audio and a Summary of the meeting should be available in due course on the CDC website. I will update with these when available.

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Extract Topic packet for September 19 2012 (Page 46)

[…]

Chronic fatigue syndrome

Andreas Kogelnik, M.D., Coalition 4 ME/CFS

Chronic fatigue syndrome

A proposal, submitted by the Coalition 4 ME/CFS, to modify codes for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) was presented and discussed at the September 2011 ICD Coordination and Maintenance Committee meeting. The National Center for Health Statistics also presented an alternative proposal, Option 2. There were many comments from the audience, and there was general support for the NCHS-proposed Option 2, moving CFS from Chapter 18, Symptoms, signs and abnormal clinical findings, not elsewhere classified, to Chapter 6, Diseases of the Nervous System but retaining separate codes for CFS and myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). The rationale for retaining separate codes included agreement on the importance of being able to extract data on the two conditions separately or combine, as needed. It was also noted that term ME is not seen in medical record documentation. Written comments received on this issue were inconclusive. There was not agreement that the two conditions are the same. While some comments were from private citizens, others were from advocacy organizations and associations that represent health care providers and other large constituencies that use the classification. The public comment period following the meeting is not meant as a poll or survey. Analysis of public comment focused on the substance of the comments; whether there was a clear scientific consensus regarding the etiology and manifestations of the condition; and an understanding of the classification, its structure and conventions, and its uses by the health care industry.

As noted in the information from the September 2011 presentation, the cause or causes of CFS remain unknown, despite a vigorous search. While a single cause for CFS may yet be identified, another possibility is that CFS represents a spectrum of illnesses resulting from multiple possible pathways. Conditions that have been proposed to trigger the development of CFS include infections, trauma, immune dysfunction, stress, and exposure to toxins. Research in this area is ongoing.

There are several case definitions currently in use, some separating CFS from ME, and others merging the two conditions. The most widely used are the 1994 case definition (http://www.cdc.gov/cfs/case-definition/index.html ), the Canadian and the Oxford definitions. A new case definition for ME was published in the 2011 international consensus criteria that emphasized recent research and clinical experience that strongly point to widespread inflammation and multisystem symptoms and neuropathology. This new definition, which considers ME and CFS as synonymous terms, however, has not been widely vetted by the health care community at large. While there is no consensus on one case definition, there is consensus that this is a serious and complex syndrome, and it is likely that there are multiple subgroups. It has been noted that some providers use the terms interchangeably while others consider one condition a subgroup of the other. There is also some overlap with fibromyalgia and CFS/ME could be considered one of the multiple chronic overlapping pain conditions.

References

1. Fukuda et al. Ann Intern Med (1994) 121:953-959
(http://www.cdc.gov/cfs/case-definition/1994.html )
2. Holmes et al. Ann Intern Med (1988) 108:387-389.
3. Sharpe et al. J Roy Soc Med (1991) 84:118-121
4. Carruthers et al. J CFS (2003) 11:7-97
5. Carruthers et al.. J Intern Med (2011) 270: 327-38.

The Coalition 4 ME/CFS has stated that they do not support Option 2 proposed in September 2011 and have submitted a revised proposal. A revised Option 2 is also being proposed, consistent with comments received supporting Option 2 as noted above. The Coalition is also requesting that their proposal be considered for implementation prior to October 1, 2014 even though the condition is not a new disease and therefore does not meet the criteria for implementation during the partial freeze.

Based on the above, the following proposals for consideration are:

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For comparison, the proposal that had been presented by CDC at the September 2011 meeting in counterpoint to an earlier proposal presented by the Coalition 4 ME/CFS at that same meeting was this:

 

 

Instead of Title term G93.3 Postviral and other chronic fatigue syndromes (CDC Option 2, September 2011)

CDC suggests retaining the Title term G93.3 Postviral fatigue syndrome (CDC Option 2, September 2012).

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Instead of Child category G93.31 Postviral fatigue syndrome, Benign myalgic encephalomyelitis

CDC is now suggesting two categories for Postviral fatigue syndrome, thus:

G93.30 Postviral fatigue syndrome, unspecified, Postviral fatigue syndrome NOS (not otherwise specified)

with a discrete Child category G93.31 Myalgic encephalomyelitis, Benign myalgic encephalomyelitis.

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No suggested change to the September 2011 CDC Option 2 suggestion for Child categories:

G93.32 Chronic fatigue syndrome, Chronic fatigue syndrome NOS.

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Related posts:

Coding CFS in ICD-10-CM: CFSAC and the Coalition4ME/CFS initiative

Extracts: ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee Meeting Summary document (CFS coding)

Extracts: ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee Meeting September 14, 2011 (Coding of CFS in ICD-10-CM)

Notice of Meeting of the ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee

Notice of Meeting of the ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee

Post #201 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2tv

Update at August 18:

CMS meeting to address more ICD-10 issues  Round up from Carl Natale for ICD10 Watch

September ICD-9-CM C & M meeting announced

The next meeting of the ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee has been announced for September 19, 2012 and a tentative agenda published.

For further information on this public process see the CDC website page:

The 2013 release of ICD-10-CM is available to download from the CDC site: International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM)

ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee

Upcoming meeting: September 19, 2012

    Tentative Agenda

Html: Federal Register Notice of Meeting of ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee

A Notice by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Notice of Meeting of the ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee

The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Classifications and Public Health Data Standards Staff announces the following meeting:

Name: ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance (C&M) Committee meeting.

Time and Date: 9 a.m.-5 p.m., September 19, 2012.

Place: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Auditorium, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, Maryland 21244.

Status: Open to the public, limited only by the space available. The meeting room accommodates approximately 240 people.

Security Considerations: Due to increased security requirements CMS has instituted stringent procedures for entrance into the building by non-government employees. Attendees will need to present valid government-issued picture identification, and sign-in at the security desk upon entering the building. Attendees who wish to attend a specific ICD-9-CM C&M meeting on September 19, 2012, must submit their name and organization by September 10, 2012, for inclusion on the visitor list. This visitor list will be maintained at the front desk of the CMS building and used by the guards to admit visitors to the meeting.

Participants who attended previous ICD-9-CM C&M meetings will no longer be automatically added to the visitor list. You must request inclusion of your name prior to each meeting you attend.

Please register to attend the meeting on-line at: http://www.cms.hhs.gov/apps/events/.Show citation box

Please contact Mady Hue (410-786-4510 or Marilu.hue@cms.hhs.gov ), for questions about the registration process.

Matters To Be Discussed: Tentative agenda items include: September 19, 2012.

ICD-10 Topics:
ICD-10 Implementation Announcements
Expansion of Thoracic Aorta Body Part Under Heart and Great Vessels System
Addendum Issues (Temporary Therapeutic Endovascular Occlusion of Vessel, changing body part from thoracic aorta to abdominal aorta)
ICD-10MS-DRGs
ICD-10HAC Translations
ICD-10MCE Translations

ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Topics:
Age related macular degeneration
Bilateral mononeuropathy
Bilateral option for cerebrovascular codes
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Complications of urinary devices
Diabetic macular edema
Food Protein Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES)
Maternal care for previous Cesarean section/previous uterine incision
Metatarsus varus (congenital metatarsus adductus)
Microscopic colitis
Mid-cervical region and coding of spinal cord injuries
Multifocal motor neuropathy
Parity to supervision of pregnancy codes
Proliferative diabetic retinopathy
Retinal vascular occlusions
Salter Harris fractures
Sesamoiditis
Shin splints
Spontaneous rupture/disruption of tendon

Agenda items are subject to change as priorities dictate.

Note:

CMS and NCHS will no longer provide paper copies of handouts for the meeting. Electronic copies of all meeting materials will be posted on the CMS and NCHS Web sites prior to the meeting at http://www.cms.hhs.gov/ICD9ProviderDiagnosticCodes/03_meetings.asp#  and http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/icd/icd9cm_maintenance.htm

Contact Persons for Additional Information: Donna Pickett, Medical Systems Administrator, Classifications and Public Health Data Standards Staff, NCHS, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 2337, Hyattsville, Maryland 20782, email dfp4@cdc.gov :, telephone 301-458-4434 (diagnosis); Mady Hue, Health Insurance Specialist, Division of Acute Care, CMS, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, Maryland 21244, email marilu.hue@cms.hhs.gov , telephone 410-786-4510 (procedures).

The Director, Management Analysis and Services Office, has been delegated the authority to sign Federal Register notices pertaining to announcements of meetings and other committee management activities, for both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.

Dated: August 9, 2012.

Catherine Ramadei,

Acting Director, Management Analysis and Services Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

[FR Doc. 2012-20019 Filed 8-14-12; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 4160-18-P

(c) 2012 US Federal Register

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Related posts:

At the ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee’s September 14, 2011 meeting, a presentation was made on behalf of the Coalition 4 ME/CFS in relation to the formal submission of a proposal that consideration be given to moving the classification of Chronic fatigue syndrome from its current proposed location within the ICD-10-CM R code chapter (Chapter 18: Symptoms and signs) to the G code chapter (Chapter 6: Diseases of the nervous system).

This would bring chapter location and parent class coding of Chronic fatigue syndrome in line with the international version of ICD-10, published in 1990, the Canadian ICD-10-CA and proposals for the forthcoming ICD-11.

No decision in response to the proposal, meeting discussions and public comment received has been conveyed following closure of the public comment period. Further discussion of Chronic fatigue syndrome has been tabled on the tentative agenda for the September 19, 2012 meeting.

I will post Summary documents and other relevant meeting materials as these become available. There are three posts on Dx Revision Watch that relate to and report on the presentation at the September 14, 2011 meeting:

Coding CFS in ICD-10-CM: CFSAC and the Coalition4ME/CFS initiative

Extracts: ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee Meeting Summary document (CFS coding)

Extracts: ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee Meeting September 14, 2011 (Coding of CFS in ICD-10-CM)

Practice Central on ICD-10-CM transition; APA Monitor and WHO Reed on ICD-11

Two articles on forthcoming classification systems: the first on ICD-10-CM from Practice Central; the second on ICD-11 from the February 2012 edition of the American Psychological Association’s “Monitor on Psychology”

Post #140 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-1Tt

Update: Medicare could delay burdensome rules on doctors | Julian Pecquet, for The Hill, February 14, 2012

“The acting head of the Medicare agency said Tuesday that she is considering giving the nation’s doctors more time to switch to a new insurance coding system that critics say would cost millions of dollars for little gain to patients.

“Marilyn Tavenner, the acting administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, told a conference of the American Medical Association (AMA) that her agency could delay adoption of the so-called ICD-10 system. Current law calls for physicians to adopt the new codes next year…

“…Speaking to reporters after her prepared remarks, Tavenner said her office would formally announce its intention to craft new regulations “within the next few days.”

ICD-10 Deadline Review Update | Andrea Kraynak, for HealthLeaders Media, February 15, 2012

“Big news regarding the ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation timeline came Tuesday morning during the American Medical Association (AMA) National Advocacy Conference in Washington, DC.”

“Per CMS acting administrator Marilyn Tavenner, CMS plans to revisit the current implementation deadline of October 1, 2013. Tavenner said CMS wants to reexamine the pace of implementing ICD-10 and reduce physicians’ administrative burden, according to an AMA tweet…”

Practice Central: Resources for Practicing Psychologists

Practice Central, a service of the APA Practice Organization (APAPO), supports practicing psychologists in all settings and at all stages of their career. APAPO is a companion organization to the American Psychological Association. Our mission is to advance and protect your ability to practice psychology.

http://www.apapracticecentral.org/update/2012/02-09/transition.aspx

Practice Update | February 2012

Transition to the ICD-10-CM: What does it mean for psychologists?

Psychologists should be aware of and prepare for the mandatory shift to ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes in October 2013

By Practice Research and Policy staff

February 9, 2012—Beginning October 1, 2013 all entities, including health care providers, covered by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) must convert to using the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code sets. The mandate represents a fundamental shift for many psychologists and other mental health professionals who are far more attuned to the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM).

Most psychologists were trained using some version of DSM. For other health care providers, the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) – which contains a chapter on mental disorders – is the classification standard.

Over the years, efforts to harmonize these two classifications have resulted in systems with similar (often identical) codes and diagnostic names. In fact, even if psychologists record DSM diagnostic codes for billing purposes, payers recognize the codes as ICD-9-CM – the official version of ICD currently used in the United States. Since 2003, the ICD-9-CM diagnostic codes have been mandated for third-party billing and reporting by HIPAA for all…

Read full article here

 

Dr Geoffrey M. Reed, PhD, Senior Project Officer, WHO Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, is seconded to WHO through IUPsyS (International Union for Psychological Science). Dr Reed co-ordinates the International Advisory Group for the Revision of ICD-10 Mental and Behavioural Disorders.

Meetings of the International Advisory Group are chaired by Steven Hyman, MD, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, a former Director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and DSM-5 Task Force Member.

The Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse will also be managing the technical part of the revision of Diseases of the Nervous System (currently Chapter VI), as it is doing for Chapter V.

February 2012 edition of the American Psychological Association’s “Monitor on Psychology”:

http://www.apa.org/monitor/2012/02/disorder-classification.aspx

Feature

Improving disorder classification, worldwide

With the help of psychologists, the next version of the International Classification of Diseases will have a more behavioral perspective.

By Rebecca A. Clay

February 2012, Vol 43, No. 2

Print version: page 40

What’s the world’s most widely used classification system for mental disorders? If you guessed the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), you would be wrong.

According to a study of nearly 5,000 psychiatrists in 44 countries sponsored by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Psychiatric Association, more than 70 percent of the world’s psychiatrists use WHO’s International Classification of Diseases (ICD) most in day-to-day practice while just 23 percent turn to the DSM. The same pattern is found among psychologists globally, according to preliminary results from a similar survey of international psychologists conducted by WHO and the International Union of Psychological Science.

“The ICD is the global standard for health information,” says psychologist Geoffrey M. Reed, PhD, senior project officer in WHO’s Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse. “It’s developed as a tool for the public good; it’s not the property of a particular profession or particular professional organization.”

Now WHO is revising the ICD, with the ICD-11 due to be approved in 2015. With unprecedented input from psychologists, the revised version’s section on mental and behavioral disorders is expected to be more psychologist-friendly than ever—something that’s especially welcome given concerns being raised about the DSM’s own ongoing revision process. (See “Protesting proposed changes to the DSM” .) And coming changes in the United States will mean that psychologists will soon need to get as familiar with the ICD as their colleagues around the world…

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For more information about the ICD revision, visit the World Health Organization.

Rebecca A. Clay is a writer in Washington, D.C

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