Continued absence of the ICD-10 G93.3 terms from the ICD-11 Beta drafting platform: Letter to key Revision personnel

Post #322 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-45z

Update: June 12, 2015: This situation is now being looked into by a member of the recently assembled ICD-11 Project Management team.

As previously posted:

Although the development process for ICD-11 has been in progress for eight years, it’s still not known how ICD Revision proposes to classify the ICD-10 G93.3 legacy terms.

On June 8, I sent a letter, via email, to WHO/ICD Revision, requesting a prompt resolution to this situation:

For the attention of Bedirhan Üstün (WHO/ICD Revision Coordinator, Project Management Team)

CC:

Dr Margaret Chan (Director-General, WHO)
Robert Jakob (Medical Officer, WHO ICD classifications)
Christopher Chute (Chair, ICD-11 Revision Steering Group)
Tarun Dua (lead WHO Secretariat for Topic Advisory Group for Neurology)
Raad Shakir (Chair, Topic Advisory Group for Neurology)
Marjorie S. Greenberg (ex-officio NCHS, WHO-FIC, ICD-11 Revision Steering Group member, team member external assessors for ICD revision process)
Anneke Schmider (WHO Technical Officer, ICD Revision Project Manager)
J Ties Boerma (ICD Revision Project Management team)
Ségolène Aymé (founder Orphanet, chair of ICD-11 Topic Advisory Group for Rare Diseases)
Stefanie Weber (DIMDI German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information, WHO-FIC)


Re: Continued absence of the ICD-10 G93.3 legacy entities from the public version of the Beta drafting platform


Monday, June 8, 2015

Dear Dr Üstün,

At the end of May, a frozen release was posted for the ICD-11 Beta draft.

I remain extremely concerned that there are still no entries in the public Beta, within any linearization, for the three ICD-10 G93.3 legacy entities:

Postviral fatigue syndrome
Benign myalgic encephalomyelitis
Chronic fatigue syndrome

As you are aware, these three entities (plus a dozen or so synonym terms) were removed without explanation from the Diseases of the nervous system chapter of the public version of the Beta draft, in early 2013.

Consequently, for over 2 years, stakeholders throughout the world have been unable to view evolving proposals for the classification of these entities within ICD-11 or to scrutinise proposed chapter location, proposed hierarchies, proposed Definitions and other Content Model parameters.

It is very difficult to monitor, make comments or suggestions where terms are not represented within the draft.

A request submitted by me, in February, via the Proposal Mechanism, to restore these entities to the public Beta has produced no response.

While these three entities remain absent from the Beta draft, stakeholders are effectively disenfranchised from participating in the revision process.

Since the start of the revision process, in 2007, no progress reports, editorials or journal papers have been published on behalf of TAG Neurology discussing the work group’s deliberations for these specific entities.

Since early 2013, when the three entities were removed from the public Beta, there has been no information available, at all.

I am aware that in March 2014, enquiries had been made by English and Scottish Health Directorates and that WHO was jointly approached by several UK registered ME/CFS patient organizations and English parliamentarians. The WHO’s response, at that point, was that proposals for the classification of these terms was unresolved and that more time and more input from the work groups was required [1].

A year later, the need for clarification for current proposals remains unmet.

Given the level of concern amongst stakeholders, globally, would you please look into this matter?

Could you please expedite the restoring of these terms to the Beta draft, with a Change History, in order that the ICD-11 development process can be inclusive of the thousands of clinicians, researchers, allied health professionals, advocacy organizations and patients with a stakeholder interest in the classification of these terms.

If it is not possible to restore terms to the Beta while a freeze is in operation, could TAG Neurology be instructed to issue an immediate statement of intention for these terms, in the interim?

Many thanks in anticipation of a swift resolution.

Sincerely,

Suzy Chapman

1 Correspondence, Scottish Health Directorate and WHO, March 2014, obtained under FOI.

Background to this letter:

In ICD-10 Version 2015:

Postviral fatigue syndrome is coded in Chapter VI: Diseases of the nervous system (the Neurology chapter), at code G93.3, under parent class G93 Other disorders of brain (view here).

Benign myalgic encephalomyelitis is the inclusion term to Postviral fatigue syndrome and assigned the G93.3 code.

Chronic fatigue syndrome is not included in ICD-10 Volume 1: The Tabular List but is indexed to G93.3 in ICD-10: Volume 3: The Alphabetical Index.

(The orange symbol denotes an Index term)

ICD102015

Proposals for ICD-11

In May 2010, a change to the hierarchical relationship between the three terms had been proposed. Whereas Postviral fatigue syndrome had been the Title category term for ICD-10, Chronic fatigue syndrome was proposed as the Title category term for ICD-11.

As part of a substantive reorganization of the Neurology chapter, the parent class, G93 Other disorders of brain (under which the ICD-10 categories G93.0 thru G93.9 were located), is proposed to be retired for ICD-11.

This has meant that the terms that sat under the G93 parent class for ICD-10 would need to be relocated under alternative parent classes for ICD-11 or have new parent classes created for them.

In July 2012, the public version of the ICD-11 Beta drafting platform had stood as in my screenshot, below.

It’s not evident in my screenshot, but the asterisk at the end of Benign myalgic encephalomyelitis displayed a hover text denoting its specification as the Inclusion term to ICD Title term, Chronic fatigue syndrome.

Also not evident in this cropped screenshot is the listing of Postviral fatigue syndrome under Synonyms.

At this point, around 14 historical or alternative terms were listed under Synonyms. These additional uncoded for terms, which had included the ICD-10-CM R53.82 terms, chronic fatigue, unspecified and chronic fatigue syndrome nos, had been scraped from other classification and EMR systems as part of the Beta drafting process :

July2512

Source: ICD-11 Beta drafting platform, July 25, 2012.

In November 2012, ICD Revision inserted a scrappy Definition for Chronic fatigue syndrome (this replaced an earlier draft ICD-11 Beta Definition). I have sourced this draft Definition to an internal ICD Revision/Stanford Protege document (line 1983):

Chronic fatigue syndrome is characterized by extreme chronic fatigue of an indeterminate cause, which is disabling andt [sic] does not improve with rest and that is exacerbated by physical or mental activity.

The “Selected Cause” sub linearization was later removed from the public Beta draft and some of the terms that had been listed under it were restored to the Neurology chapter and to other chapters. But Title term, Chronic fatigue syndrome, its Inclusion term and its list of Synonyms were not restored to any chapter.

Since February 2013, no listing can be found in any chapter of the public version of the Beta draft, under any linearization, for any of the terms, Postviral fatigue syndrome, Benign myalgic encephalomyelitis or Chronic fatigue syndrome, either as uniquely coded for ICD Title terms, or as Inclusion terms or as Synonyms to Title terms, or listed in the ICD-11 Beta Index.

So currently, there is no information within the Beta draft for proposals for these three terms.

The public version of the Beta drafting platform displays no editing “Change History” or “Category Notes” for these terms and their continued absence from the draft is hampering professional and public stakeholder scrutiny, discourse and comment.

This is not acceptable for any disease category, given that ICD Revision is promoted by WHO’s, Bedirhan Üstün, as an open and transparent process that is inclusive of all classes of stakeholder. The recent external review of the revision process has called for greater transparency [1].

Since June 2013, my repeated requests for an explanation for the absence of these three terms from the Beta draft and for ICD Revision’s intentions for these terms were ignored by ICD Revision until July 2014, when a response was forthcoming from ICD Revision’s, Dr Geoffrey Reed.

It is understood that Annette Brooke MP also received a response, in July 2014, from WHO’s, Dr Robert Jakob, in respect of the joint organizations’ letter of March 18, for which Ms Brooke had been a co-signatory [2].

What clarifications have been given?

WHO and ICD Revision’s, Dr Geoffrey Reed (Senior Project Officer, Revision of Mental and behavioural disorders), have said that there has been no proposal and no intention to include ME or other conditions such as fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome in the classification of mental disorders.

Dr Reed has said that the easiest way to make this absolutely clear will be through the use of exclusion terms. However, he has said that he would be unable to request that exclusion terms are added to relevant Mental and behavioural disorders categories (e.g. Bodily distress disorder) until the conditions that are being excluded exist in the classification; that at such time, he would be happy to do so.

In August 2014, I submitted two FOI requests, one to the Scottish Health Directorate, one to the English Department of Health. The latter was not deemed specific enough in terms of named health agencies for a response to be generated, but I did receive information regarding the former.

Extract from FOI Response: September 24, 2014: FOI request fulfilled by (SCOTLAND) ACT 2002 (FOISA),

Information held covering the time period indicated relates to an email exchange on 11 and 12 March 2014 as part of a request for advice in answering Ministerial correspondence.

On 11 March the World Health Organisation WHO were asked “I would be very grateful for your help in confirming the status of an element within the WHO’s ICD 11 regarding ME/CFS. On 25th February in the UK parliament, the Under-Secretary of State for Health informed the UK parliament that the WHO had publicy stated that there was no proposal  to reclassify ME/CFS in ICD-11…I would be very grateful if you can confirm that this is the case and if possible, provide a web link to the original wording so I can include this within the correspondence I am preparing”.

The WHO responded on 12 March; “The question regarding MS/CFS [sic] and ICD-11 has been asked recently by several different parties. At this point in time, the ICD-11 is still under development, and to handle this classification issue we will need more time and input from the relevant working groups. It would be premature to make any statement on the subject below.

The general information on ICD Revision can be accessed here: http://www.who.int/classifications/icd/revision/. The current state of development of ICD-11 (draft) can be viewed here (and comments can be made, after self registration): http://www.who.int/classifications/icd11 ”.

A further email on 12 March to the WHO asked; “It would be fair to say then …that work will continue on the draft with an expected publication in 2015?”.

WHO responded on 12 March; “Work on the draft will continue until presentation at the World Health Assembly in 2017**. Before, reviews and field testing will provide input to a version that is available for commenting, as much as possible and proposals can be submitted online* with the mechanisms provided already.”

*Since the three terms are currently not accounted for within the Beta draft this impedes the submission of comments.

**Rescheduled in May, this year; the proposed target for presentation for WHA approval is currently May 2018.

This is all that has been disclosed by WHO/ICD Revision in respect of current proposals for the classification of the three ICD-10 G93.3 terms, despite the fact that ICD-11 has now been under development for 8 years, and prior to the timeline extension in January 2014, the new edition had been scheduled for WHA approval and dissemination in 2015.

There remain 6 important questions to be answered by WHO/ICD Revision:

• under which chapter(s) are PVFS, BME and CFS proposed to be located?
• under which parent classes?
• what hierarchies are proposed, in terms of coded for Title terms, Inclusions, Synonyms?
• which of the terms are to be assigned definitions?
• where will definitions be sourced from?
• when will the terms be restored to the draft to enable scrutiny and comment?

Important caveats: The public Beta platform is not a static document, it is a work in progress, subject to daily editing and revision, to field test evaluation and to approval by the RSG and WHO classification experts. Not all new proposals may survive the ICD-11 field tests. Chapter numbering, codes and “sorting codes” currently assigned to ICD categories are not stable and will change as chapters and parent/child hierarchies are reorganized. The public version of the Beta is incomplete; not all “Content Model” parameters display or are populated; the draft may contain errors and omissions.

References and related posts

1 ICD-11 Revision releases External review and Response: shifts projected WHA adoption to 2018

2 Joint Open letter to WHO/ICD Revision over classification of absent G93.3 terms for ICD-11 Beta draft

3 ICD-11 Revision releases External review and Response: shifts projected WHA adoption to 2018

4 Briefing paper on ICD-11 and PVFS, ME and CFS: Part 1

5 Briefing paper on ICD-11 and PVFS, ME and CFS: Part 2

6 Summary of responses from WHO re: Bodily distress disorder, Bodily stress syndrome, Bodily Distress Syndrome

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WHO considers further extension to ICD-11 development timeline

Post #275 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-3sc

Information in this report relates to the World Health Organization’s ICD-11, currently under development. It does not apply to the current ICD version (ICD-10) or to the forthcoming US specific “clinical modification” of ICD-10, known as ICD-10-CM.

Timeline slippage

Documents posted recently by the World Health Organization (WHO) indicate that ICD Revision is failing to meet development targets and a further extension to the ICD-11 timeline is under consideration.

ICD serves as the international health information standard for the collection, classification, processing and presentation of disease-related data in national and global health statistics.

The 10th edition (ICD-10) was adopted by the World Health Assembly in 1990.

The development process for the next edition (ICD-11) began in April 2007, with ICD-11 scheduled for dissemination by 2012 and the timelines for the development of ICD-11 and DSM-5 running more or less in parallel [1] [2].

Early on in the revision process, the ICD-11 dissemination date was extended. By 2009, the final draft was scheduled for World Health Assembly (WHA) approval in 2014. In order to be ready for global implementation in 2015, the technical work on ICD-11 would need to be completed by 2012 [3].

The WHA approval date was subsequently shunted from 2014 to 2015 – four years later than originally planned and the current, projected implementation date is 2016+.
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“…And just a small detail: who will do all this work?” [4]

ICD-11 is a very ambitious and under-resourced project. Given the scale of the undertaking, the technical complexity, the limited funding and human resources, the feasibility of the project reaching its targets by May 2015 has proved unrealistic.

I have written a number of times on this site that I did not envisage dissemination of ICD-11 by 2016 without some scaling back of the project’s scope – or an announcement, at some point this year, of a further extension to the timeline.

ICD-11 Revision Steering Group considers its options

WHO has recently posted a meeting materials document [5] and a slide presentation [6] which summarize, inter alia, ICD-11’s progress, current development status and timelines for finalization date and approval by WHO Governing Bodies.

ICD Revision is considering extending the timeline by up to a couple of years.

This 14 page document Committee for the Coordination of Statistical Activities, Twenty-second Session 4-6 September 2013, Items for discussion and decision: Item 8 of the provisional agenda can be downloaded here

or opened on Dx Revision WatchPDF: SA-2013-12-Add1-Health-WHO

It summarizes the status of the ICD Revision process under section headings:

1. Background: need and mandate
2. General organization structure of the multiple streams of work
3. Progress and current status
4. The remaining steps
5. Further maintenance of ICD after finalization
6. Timelines for the finalization date and approval by WHO Governing Bodies

Extracts from the document setting out the rationale and options for postponement of WHA Approval:

[…]

3. Progress and Current Status of ICD Revision:

[…]

BETA PHASE:

At this point in time, 1 September 2013, an ICD2013 Beta version has been produced for review purposes and field trials after 6 years of drafting phases.

The current ICD 2013 Beta version has relatively stable classification lists (i.e. linearizations) for Mortality and Morbidity recording. It will be reviewed by the specific Mortality Reference Group and the Morbidity Reference Group to see how well it fits the purpose and proposed transition from ICD‐10.

In addition, the Beta version has planned processes for:

(i) Systematic international scientific peer review
(ii) Submission of additional proposals from public groups and scientists
(iii) Conducting field trials for its applicability and reliability
(iv) Production support in multiple languages (translations) starting with WHO official languages
(v) Preparations for transitions from ICD‐10 to ICD‐11.

[…]

6. Timelines

The current ICD Revision Process timeline foresees that the ICD is submitted to the WHA in 2015 May and could then be implemented. Between now and 2015, there remains 20 months to conduct the remaining tasks summarized above as: 1. Reviews, 2. Additional Proposals, 3. Field Trials, 4. Translations, and 5. Transition Preparations.

Given the technical requirements these steps could be expedited in the next 20 months. The experience obtained thus far, however, suggests that this timeframe will be extremely tight for paying due diligence to the work especially in terms of: appropriate consultations with expert groups; communication and dissemination with stakeholders; and sufficient time for field testing in multiple countries and settings, and carrying out the resulting edits.

WHO Secretariat would like to discuss this with all stakeholders and evaluate the possible options:

a. Keep ICD submission to WHA to 2015 as originally planned and implementation / adoption date may be free by any Member State (current position – no change).

b. Postpone submission to WHA to a later year to allow longer time for field trials and other transition preparations.

[…]

In conclusion:

(a) WHO Secretariat could produce an ICD 2015 ready including Mortality and Morbidity Linearizations, Reference Guide and Index with the appropriate resolution to go to the World Health Assembly. This timeframe, however, is extremely tight for paying due diligence to the work especially in terms of: appropriate consultations with expert groups; and sufficient time for field testing in multiple countries and settings, and carrying out the resulting edits

(b) If the timeline is advanced to 2016, there will be more time to have ICD 2016 version with more translations and incorporations of some field tests results.

(c) If the timeline is advanced to 2017, ICD 2017 will be ready with most Field Test results incorporated and maintenance scheme tested.

[…]

If WHO/ICD-11 Revision Steering Group does elect to postpone submission for WHA approval until May 2017, dissemination of ICD-11 may not be scheduled before 2018.

Once approved and released, adoption of ICD-11 won’t happen overnight. It may take several years before WHO Member States adopt ICD-11. Low resource and developing countries may also take longer to prepare for and transition to the new edition.

Note for US readers: According to Page 3332 of DHSS Office of Secretary Final Rule document (Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 11 / Friday, January 16, 2009 / Rules and Regulations):

“…We [ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee] discussed waiting to adopt the ICD-11 code set in the August 22, 2008 proposed rule (73 FR 49805)…

“…However, work cannot begin on developing the necessary U.S. clinical modification to the ICD-11 diagnosis codes or the ICD-11 companion procedure codes until ICD-11 is officially released. Development and testing of a clinical modification to ICD-11 to make it usable in the United States will take an estimated additional 5 to 6 years. We estimated that the earliest projected date to begin rulemaking for implementation of a U.S. clinical modification of ICD-11 would be the year 2020.” [7]

This projection, in early 2009, would have been based on the assumption that ICD-11 was anticipated to be finalized and submitted for WHA Approval by 2014 (now potentially shifting to 2017).

An additional two year delay in the finalization of the ICD-11 code sets would likely impact on the development process for a clinical modification of ICD-11 for US specific use, kicking adaptation and implementation of an ICD-11-CM even further down the road.

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This slide presentation, below, was uploaded to Slideshare on September 9 by Dr Bedirhan Üstün, Coordinator, Classification, Terminology and Standards, World Health Organization, and also sets out the postponement options now under consideration:

Slide presentation: World Health Organization Classifications, Terminologies, Standards

ICD Revision: Quality Safety Meeting 2013 September 9-10

Where are we? What remains to be done? Shall we have ICD WHA submission in 2015 or later?

http://www.slideshare.net/ustunb/icd-2013-qs-tag-26027668

Slide 29:

Ustun 29rule

Slide 30:

Ustun 30rule

Slide 34:

Ustun 34rule

Slide 35: [WHA Approval – options under consideration]

Ustun 35rule
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References

1. Agenda Item No. 25: Revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) and Involvement of Psychology International Union of Psychological Science Committee on International Relations Action, March 28–30, 2008 IUPsyS Mar 08 Agenda Item 25 ICD-10

2. Letter Saxena, WHO, to Ritchie, IUPsyS (International Union for Psychological Science), August 2007 Exhibit 1 WHO Letter Aug 07

3. Dr Geoffrey Reed, Ph.D., May 2009, personal correspondence.

4. Closing remarks, PowerPoint presentation: “Proposal for the ICD Beta Platform”, Stanford team, 12.04.11, WHO, Geneva.

5. Committee for the Coordination of Statistical Activities, Twenty-second Session 4-6 September 2013, Items for discussion and decision: Item 8 of the provisional agenda, 3 September 2013 Full document in PDF format

6. Slide presentation: ICD Revision: Where are we? Bedirhan Ustun, World Health Organization Classifications, Terminologies, Standards, ICD Revision: Quality Safety Meeting 2013, September 9-10, 2013 http://www.slideshare.net/ustunb/icd-2013-qs-tag-26027668

7. DHSS Office of Secretary Final Rule document (Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 11 / Friday, January 16, 2009 / Rules and Regulations), Page 3332.

Psychologists’ perspectives on the diagnostic classification of mental disorders: Results from the WHO-IUPsyS Global Survey

Post #263 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-3dj

Psychologists’ perspectives on the diagnostic classification of mental disorders: Results from the WHO-IUPsyS Global Survey

Int J Psychol. 2013 Jun 10. [Epub ahead of print]

Psychologists’ perspectives on the diagnostic classification of mental disorders: Results from the WHO-IUPsyS Global Survey.

Evans SC, Reed GM, Roberts MC, Esparza P, Watts AD, Correia JM, Ritchie P, Maj M, Saxena S.
Source
a Clinical Child Psychology Program, University of Kansas, Lawrence , KS, USA.

Abstract

This study examined psychologists’ views and practices regarding diagnostic classification systems for mental and behavioral disorders so as to inform the development of the ICD-11 by the World Health Organization (WHO). WHO and the International Union of Psychological Science (IUPsyS) conducted a multilingual survey of 2155 psychologists from 23 countries, recruited through their national psychological associations. Sixty percent of global psychologists routinely used a formal classification system, with ICD-10 used most frequently by 51% and DSM-IV by 44%. Psychologists viewed informing treatment decisions and facilitating communication as the most important purposes of classification, and preferred flexible diagnostic guidelines to strict criteria. Clinicians favorably evaluated most diagnostic categories, but identified a number of problematic diagnoses. Substantial percentages reported problems with crosscultural applicability and cultural bias, especially among psychologists outside the USA and Europe. Findings underscore the priority of clinical utility and professional and cultural differences in international psychology. Implications for ICD-11 development and dissemination are discussed.

PMID: 23750927

[PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Slide Presentation: Aug 3, 2012

The WHO-IUPsyS Global Survey of Psychologists’ Attitudes Toward Mental Disorders Classification.

Download PDF WHO-IUPsyS Global Survey slides

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More information on this WHO study can be found on Page 7 (3.) of this report:

http://www.apa.org/international/outreach/icd-report-2012.pdf

2012 Annual Report of the International Union of Psychological Science to the American Psychological Association

Revision of World Health Organization’s ICD-10 Mental and Behavioural Disorders

Pierre L.-J. Ritchie, Ph.D., Main Representative to the World Health Organization, International Union of Psychological Science, January, 2013

Click link for PDF document    WHO-IUPsyS ICD Survey Report Report 2012

This report also sets out the responsibilities of ICD Revision working groups, on Page 3 (1.1), and gives some information on the field studies for ICD-11 and ICD11-PHC, on Page 8 (4.)

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The earlier study: WPA-WHO Global Survey of Psychiatrists’ Attitudes Towards Mental Disorders Classification can be downloaded here: 

The WPA-WHO Global Survey of Psychiatrists’ Attitudes Towards Mental Disorders Classification

World Psychiatry 2011;10:118-131

Research report

Geoffrey M Reed, João Mendonça Correia, Patricia Esparza, Shekhar Saxena, Mario Maj

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ICD-11 Revision Beta drafting process: stakeholder participation

ICD-11 Revision Beta drafting process: stakeholder participation

Post #194 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-2nw

Information in this report relates to the World Health Organization’s ICD-11, currently under development. It does not apply to the existing ICD-10 or to the forthcoming US specific “clinical modification” of ICD-10, known as ICD-10-CM.

Update at August 2, 2012:

ICD-11 Slide Presentation:     Harrison Slides 2011 PDF 3MB

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Update at August 2, 2012:

Dr Robert J.G. Chalmers, co-chair and managing editor of ICD Revision Dermatology Topic Advisory Group put out a call, yesterday, on the website of the American Academy of Dermatology Association (AAD) for input into the Beta draft for Chapter 12 Diseases of the skin:

An invitation to contribute to the future of dermatology

ICD-11 Update

By Robert J.G. Chalmers

ICD-11 draft is ready for comments and criticism

By Robert J.G. Chalmers, MB, FRCP, August 01, 2012

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When will ICD-11 be ready for dissemination?

Slipping targets

The revision of ICD-10 and development of the structure for ICD-11 began in 2007.

ICD-11 was originally planned to be ready for dissemination by 2012, with the timelines for the revisions of ICD-10 and DSM-IV running more or less in parallel. Source: Archive documents, References [1] [2].

Very early on in the revision process, the ICD-11 dissemination date was extended from 2012 to 2015. In 2009, launch of the Beta draft was timelined for May 2011, with the final draft scheduled for submission to World Health Assembly (WPA) for approval in 2014.

In order to be ready for global implementation in 2015, the technical work on ICD-11 would need to be completed by 2012. Source: Dr Geoffrey Reed, Ph.D., May 2009, via personal correspondence.

+++

ICD-11 still at the Beta drafting stage

In early 2011, in response to slipping targets for content population and software development, ICD Revision and WHO-FIC were discussing the pros and cons of postponing the launch of a Beta drafting platform until later that year or until May 2012, and whether an interim solution might be to launch “a hybrid model of opening the revision process to public comment and suggestions at the same time not a full scale beta phase with field trials…”

Sources: Slide presentation: ICD Revision Paediatrics Meeting, Ankara, Turkey, February 28 – March 1, 2011;
Report: WHO-FIC Council conference call, February 16, 2011: Page 6: 
PDF for Report [3]

+++

Launch of the Beta delayed

The decision was made to delay launching the Beta draft until May 2012. With the Alpha and Beta stages already running a year or more behind 2009 targets, it’s not clear how much time can be allocated for completing the Beta phase and two year field trials period – if the target for a final version for public viewing in 2014 is going to be reached.

According to the ICD-11 Timeline, presentation for World Health Assembly approval has been shifted to May 2015 and in this paper, published in March 2012 by Christopher Chute, MD, (Chair, ICD-11 Revision Steering Group) et al, publication of ICD-11 is now expected “around 2016.”

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“…And just a small detail: who will do all this work?” [4]

ICD-11 is a very ambitious project.

The burden of drafting and liaison is being carried out largely via electronic means between individuals scattered across the globe and in addition to their clinical and academic responsibilities.

Given the scale of the undertaking, its technical complexity, limited funding and human resources, lack of an overall project manager, reported communication problems between WHO, Revision Steering Group, Topic Advisory Group managing editors and members and the amount of work that remains to be completed, I cannot see this vision of WHO’s Bedirhan Üstün reaching fruition by 2016.

There are some interesting comments in this Agenda Appendix (Page 6 of 10) on project funding, lack of resources, project management and lines of communication: ICD-11 April 11 Meeting Agenda

For make-up of the Revision Steering Group (RSG) and the various Topic Advisory Groups (TAGs) see links at end of post. Membership of the various sub working groups to Topic Advisory Groups and the names of external peer reviewers of proposals and content have not been published by ICD-11 Revision.

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Where can the Beta drafting platform be viewed?

ICD Revision Steering Group and the various Topic Advisory Groups that are developing the Beta draft are working on an electronic collaborative authoring platform, called the iCAT, on a password protected server accessible only by WHO classification experts, Revision Steering Group, Topic Advisory Group Managing Editors and revision process IT personnel and software developers. It looks similar to this:

For more views of the iCAT see Slides 20-25 and Slide 39 of this 2011 slide presentation:

ICD-11 Slide Presentation:     Harrison Slides 2011 PDF 3MB

The iCAT platform is more complex than the publicly viewable version of the Beta platform and has a mechanism for recording change histories which tracks additions, deletions and revisions to the draft as ICD chapters are reorganized and new content generated and populated.

Population of content is managed by the Topic Advisory Group (TAG) Managing Editors following review by the Revision Steering Group. Structural changes to the classification, eg changing parent/child relationships and editing the linearizations can only be done by TAG Managing Editors in liaison with WHO classification experts. Source: Drafting Workflow text and chart [MS Word]; Swim Lane Workflow chart [PDF].

The publicly viewable version of the Beta drafting platform, which was launched in May 2012, looks like this:

With no change histories displaying in the public version of the Beta it is difficult for stakeholders to track proposed hierarchical changes to existing categories, changes to the names of parent classes or child categories, proposed introduction of new category terms (and the rationales for these) or proposed retirement of ICD-10 categories.

In the absence of rationales, it cannot be determined whether the disappearance of a category or group of categories is due to error or oversight by Advisory Group Managing Editors or others with editor level access, a temporary absence while a specific chapter section is being reorganized or whether these no longer displaying categories are intended to be subsumed under existing or new categories.

For example, a number of ICD-10 F45 and F48 Somatoform Disorder categories were removed from the Beta draft in early July with no explanation of intention.

Whilst ICD Revision invites interaction with the drafting process, the lack of clear intent on the part of Advisory Group editors and lack of response to requests for clarifications hinder submission of meaningful stakeholder comment and productive interaction with the process.

Caveats

When viewing the Beta draft, be mindful of the Caveats published by ICD Revision; the draft is in a state of flux.

The ICD-11 Beta drafting process is a work in progress over the next two to three years. The Beta draft is updated on a daily basis to reflect the work being carried out on the iCAT platform. Parent terms, category terms and sorting codes assigned to categories are subject to change as chapter reorganization progresses.

The Beta draft can be accessed here:

Beta draft Foundation Component (FC) view:

http://apps.who.int/classifications/icd11/browse/f/en

Beta draft Linearization Morbity (LM) view:

http://apps.who.int/classifications/icd11/browse/l-m/en

For definitions of Synonyms, Inclusions, Exclusions and ICD-11 terminology see the iCAT Glossary.

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Who are the stakeholders in ICD?

government service providers
policy makers and policy implementation agencies
health care professionals and practitioners
physician groups, especially primary care physicians
psychiatrists
psychologists
nurses
researchers and clinician academics
lay health care workers (who deliver most of the primary and mental health care in some developing countries)
social workers
patients (aka service users/consumers of health services), their families and carers
advocacy and disability rights organizations
health information managers and coders
health information technology workers
insurers

On its Facebook page, in June, ICD Revision put out a specific call for professionals with backgrounds in the following fields:

http://www.facebook.com/ICD11

Do you have a background in any of the following areas?

Medicine
Nursing
Midwifery
Dentistry
Pharmacy
Health information management (coding, medical records)
Environmental and occupational health and hygiene
Physiotherapy or Physical therapy
Nutrition
Social Sciences
Psychology
Social work and counseling
Epidemiology
Health Policy
Traditional and complementary medicine

WHO is asking experts from all over the world to sign up today to participate in the ICD revision.

www.who.int/classifications/icd11 

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How can stakeholders participate in the Beta process?

The public version of the Beta platform can be viewed without registration.

Professional stakeholders and others who register an interest are able to interact with the drafting process and have access to additional content.

Interested stakeholders can register here

Registered stakeholders are permitted to:

• Add comments on and read other stakeholder comments on concepts; title terms; synonyms; inclusion terms, exclusions and other Content Model parameter terms;
• Comment on whether a category is in the right place;
• Comment on whether the category is useful for Primary Care; Research; Clinical;
• Suggest definitions (with source for definition) for a disease or disorder and comment on already populated draft definitions;
• Make proposals to change ICD categories;
• Offer to participate in field trials (for professionals);
• Offer to assist in translating ICD into other languages

Comments left by registered stakeholders are not visible to non registered viewers. Comments cannot be edited or deleted and appear immediately.

Recent comments get aggregated here:

http://apps.who.int/classifications/icd11/browse/Contributions/RecentComments

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PDFs of Print Versions for the ICD-11 Beta Morbidity Linearization

Registered users can download individual chapters or the full linearization using the links on this page. These PDF files are updated every few days to reflect the daily revisions to the drafting platform:

http://apps.who.int/classifications/icd11/browse/l-m/en/Printables
 

For more information on how it is envisaged professional and lay stakeholders will interact with the drafting process see:

PowerPoint presentation slides in Posts #70 and #71:

ICD Revision Process Alpha Evaluation Meeting 11 – 14 April 2011: The Way Forward?

ICD Revision Process Alpha Evaluation Meeting documents and PowerPoint slide presentations

ICD-11 Revision Video invitation to participate here: Video invitation to participate

Press Release here announcing launch of Beta drafting platform. Further media coverage here

Specific call for comments from neurology professionals on The Lancet Neurology site here:

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/laneur/article/PIIS1474-4422(12)70125-4/fulltext

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Recently issued documents around the Beta drafting process

Frequently Asked Questions About ICD-11

ICD-11 Beta: Expectations, Concerns and Known Issues: Information for Beta Participants

http://www.who.int/classifications/icd/revision/betaexpectations/en/

ICD-11 Known Concerns and Criticisms: Known concerns about the ICD-11 Beta phase

http://www.who.int/classifications/icd/revision/icd11betaknownconcerns.pdf 

     ICD-11 Beta known concerns

ICD-11 Known Problems and Issues: General known issues

http://www.who.int/classifications/icd/revision/icd11knownissues.pdf 

     ICD-11 General known issues

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The ICD-11 Content Model

ICD Revision says that the most important difference between ICD-10 and ICD-11 will be the Content Model.

In ICD-10, other than Chapter V Mental and behavioral disorders, there are no definitions or other descriptive content associated with ICD categories – just hierarchical lists of diseases arranged by chapter and their ICD codes.

But content in ICD-11 is being populated in accordance with the Content Model Reference Guide and there will be the potential for considerably more content to be included for diseases, disorders and syndromes in ICD-11 than appears in ICD-10, across all chapters:

“Population of the Content Model and the subsequent review process will serve as the foundation for the creation of the ICD-11. The Content Model identifies the basic characteristics needed to define any ICD category through use of multiple parameters.”

The most recently published version of the Content Model Reference Guide is here:

Content Model Reference Guide January 2011  [MS Word]

There are currently 13 defined parameters in the content model to describe a category in ICD. All categories will have an ICD Entity Title, Classification Properties, Textual Definition, Terms and up to 13 parameters described.

Content Model Parameters

  • ICD Entity Title
  • Classification Properties
  • Textual Definitions
  • Terms
  • Body System/Structure Description
  • Temporal Properties
  • Severity of Subtypes Properties
  • Manifestation Properties
  • Causal Properties
  • Functioning Properties
  • Specific Condition Properties
  • Treatment Properties
  • Diagnostic Criteria

Some ICD-11 chapters are more advanced than others for reorganization of categories and population of proposed definitions and text for other parameters.

In setting itself the task of generating, peer reviewing, populating and approving this amount of detail across the entire ICD, one has to question how realistic a goal this is within current timeframes.

“Populating the Content Model is a critical task for the revision. Failure results in failure of delivery of ICD‑11.” [4]

It would not surprise me if at some point before the end of this year, ICD Revision Steering Group announces further delays for the Beta drafting and field trial stages and an extension to the projected dissemination date, or a scaling back of the project if completion of ICD-11 and its several, planned speciality publications, by 2016, is to be viable.

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Will ICD-11 be implemented worldwide from 2015/16?

ICD-10 is used in over 100 countries, worldwide. Assuming ICD-11 does meet it schedules, it may still take several years before countries currently using ICD-10 are ready to adopt ICD-11.

Several countries have been authorized by WHO to develop their own “Clinical Modification (CM)” of ICD. Canada uses an adaptation called ICD-10-CA, with a version published for 2009. Germany uses a version called ICD-10-GM. Australia (ICD-10-AM) and Thailand (ICD-10-TM) also use country specific modifications of ICD-10.

The US lags behind the rest of the world and is still using a CM version of ICD based on the ICD-9, which is long since retired by the WHO.

Instead of moving onto ICD-11, once this is completed, the US had scheduled implementation of a clinical modification of ICD-10 called ICD-10-CM, for October 1, 2013. ICD-10-CM has been in development for a considerable number of years.

On April 17, 2012 the Secretary of HHS issued a proposed rule to delay the compliance date for ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS codes sets from October 1, 2013 to October 1, 2014, in order to allow more time for clinical practices and the coding industry to prepare for transitioning from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM.

The public comment period for the proposed rule to delay the compliance date is now closed and comments are in the process of being reviewed. A final rule has yet to be announced. Until a new compliance date has been ratified and the revised implementation date reached, codes in ICD-10-CM are not valid for any purpose or use but can be viewed for free on the CDC website together with other ICD-10-CM documentation.

The US might not anticipate moving on to a clinical modification of ICD-11 before 2020 and possibly later*.

*Source: DHSS Office of Secretary Final Rule document“We estimated that the earliest projected date to begin rulemaking for implementation of a U.S. clinical modification of ICD–11 would be the year 2020.”

WHO-FIC meeting materials suggest no earlier than 2018 for Canada. Australia is discussing earlier adoption of ICD-11 (or a CM of ICD-11).

Harmonization between ICD-11 and DSM-5

There is already a degree of correspondence between DSM-IV categories and Chapter V of ICD-10. For the next editions, the APA and WHO have committed as far as possible:

“To facilitate the achievement of the highest possible extent of uniformity and harmonization between ICD-11 mental and behavioural disorders and DSM-V disorders and their diagnostic criteria.”

with the objective that

“The WHO and APA should make all attempts to ensure that in their core versions, the category names, glossary descriptions and criteria are identical for ICD and DSM.”

WHO acknowledges that there may be areas where congruency may not be achievable.

With the timelines for DSM-5 and ICD-11 running out of synch (DSM-5 slated for publication in May 2013; ICD-11 still at the Beta drafting stage with a two year period scheduled for completion of its field trials), this may present barriers to harmonization.

In a June 2011 presentation to the International Congress of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, APA President, John M. Oldham, MD, MS, spoke of “Negotiations in progress to ‘harmonize’ DSM-5 with ICD-11 and to ‘retro-fit’ these codes into ICD-10-CM” and that DSM-5 would need “to include ICD-10-CM ‘F-codes’ in order to process all insurance claims beginning October 1, 2011.”

With the three systems: DSM-5 (publication date May 2013), ICD-10-CM (subject to partial code freeze since October 1, 2011 until 2014+ with new compliance date t.b.a.) and ICD-11 (dissemination scheduled for 2015+) set to become potentially more closely aligned, proposals for ICD-11 may have implications for US health care professionals and patient populations who might also consider themselves stakeholders in the ICD-11 development process.

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References and additional ICD-11 related links and documentation

According to documents [1] and [2], ICD-11 was originally planned for dissemination by 2012, with the timelines for revisions of ICD-10 and DSM-IV running more or less in parallel. By 2008, the completion date for ICD-11 had been extended to 2014. In December 2009, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) announced a shift in the publication date for DSM-5 to May 2013. APA News Release No. 09-65 

1] IUPsyS Mar 08 Agenda Item 25 ICD-10
International Union of Psychological Science COMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS ACTION, March 28–30, 2008, Agenda Item No. 25: Revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) and Involvement of Psychology

2] Exhibit 1 WHO Letter Aug 07 
Letter Saxena, WHO, to Ritchie, IUPsyS (International Union for Psychological Science), August 2007
Source: http://www.apa.org/international/governance/cirp/s08agenda25-Exhibit1.pdf  

3] Pages 5-6: Report, WHO FIC Council conference call, 16 February 2011, PDF format

4] Closing remarks, PowerPoint presentation: “Proposal for the ICD Beta Platform”, Stanford team, 12.04.11, WHO, Geneva.

5] Key document: ICD Revision Project Plan version 2.1 9 July 2010

Key links

ICD-11 Beta drafting platform  |  Publicly viewable version

WHO ICD Revision  |  Main WHO website: Revision Steering Group and Topic Advisory Groups
ICD-11 Revision site  |  Revision resources [Google site currently unavailable]
ICD-11 Revision site Documents Page  |  Key revision documents and meeting materials  [Google site currently unavailable]

ICD-11 Revision Information  |
ICD-11 Timeline  |

ICD Information Sheet  |

Revision News  |
Steering Group  |
Topic Advisory Groups  |

ICD-11 YouTube Channel  |  Video reports
ICD-11 on Facebook  |
ICD-11 on Twitter  |
ICD-11 Blog  |  Not updated since October 2009

ICD-11 YouTubes collated on Dx Revision Watch ICD-11 YouTubes  |

WHO Publications

ICD-10 Tabular List online Version: 2010  |  International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision Version: 2010, Tabular List of inclusions and Chapter List

ICD-10 Volume 2: Instruction Manual  |  Volume 2 online Version: 2010 PDF Download

ICD-10 for Mental and Behavioural Disorders Diagnostic Criteria for Research  |  PDF download
ICD-10 for Mental and Behavioural Disorders Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines  |  PDF download

ICD-10 Volume 3: The Alphabetical Index  |  WHO does not make ICD-10 Volume 3: The Alphabetical Index available online

About the World Health Organization (WHO)

The WHO Family of International Classifications  

History of ICD

WHO releases ICD-11 Beta drafting platform

WHO releases ICD-11 Beta drafting platform

Post #170 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-28K

Yesterday, May 14, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced the launch of the ICD-11 Beta drafting platform.

Press Release here and below.

This publicly viewable platform replaces the Alpha drafting platform that has been viewable since mid 2011. ICD-11 Revision Topic Advisory Groups are using a separate drafting platform with greater functionality than the platform launched yesterday.

Interested stakeholders can register for increased access and to interact with the Beta drafting platform.

In terms of functionality, the Beta platform does not appear to incorporate any additional features over the Alpha. 

In terms of population of content, some entities have text populated for Definitions, others are still waiting for provisional definitions. Some entities have very few “Content Model” parameters listed, others have the following: Parents; Definition; Synonyms; Exclusions; Narrower Terms; Causal Mechanisms; Body Site.

It’s not evident how many of the proposed 13 “Content Model” parameters that describe an ICD-11 entity term will eventually be populated for any given entity. The original list of 13 “Content Model” parameters has been modified since early 2011, but no new documentation has been publicly released that sets out the new parameters.

More information on the Beta drafting platform here:

http://www.who.int/classifications/icd/revision/en/

The International Classification of Diseases 11th Revision is due by 2015

Participate in the ICD Revision

Beta phase participants will have the opportunity to:

• Make Comments
• Make Proposals
• Propose definitions of diseases in a structured way
• Participate in Field Trials
• Assist in translating ICD into other languages

Video invitation to participate
Frequently Asked Questions About ICD-11
ICD Information Sheet

WHO video invitation from Dr Marie-Paule Kieny on ICD-11

For the first time, experts in the public health community who work with patient diagnosis and treatment have an opportunity to contribute to the development of the next version of the ICD. This is WHO’s publication that ensures all aspects of the health community refer to diseases and health conditions in a consistent way.

WHO is calling on experts, health providers and stakeholders from around the world to participate in the 11th revision process. The final ICD-11 will be released in 2015.

With your help, this classification will be more comprehensive than ever before.

 

The Beta drafting platform can be found here:

Linearizations:

http://apps.who.int/classifications/icd11/browse/l-m/en

Foundation Component:

http://apps.who.int/classifications/icd11/browse/f/en#

User Guide:

http://apps.who.int/classifications/icd11/browse/Help/en

Listing for Chronic fatigue syndrome:

http://apps.who.int/classifications/icd11/browse/f/en#/http%3a%2f%2fwho.int%2ficd%23G93.3

WHO Press Release

May 2102

http://www.who.int/features/2012/international_classification_disease/en/

WHO seeks health experts’ input for 11th International Classification of Diseases

For the first time, experts in the public health community who work with patient diagnosis and treatment have an opportunity to contribute to the development of the next version of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), which is WHO’s publication that ensures all members of the health community refer to diseases and health conditions in a consistent way.

WHO/Jim Holmes

WHO is releasing the beta version of what will be ICD-11 on a wiki-type platform that allows stakeholder comments to be added after peer review. The final ICD-11 will be released in 2015.

WHO encourages anyone interested to comment to develop a more comprehensive classification.

Foundation for reliable health data

The ICD is the foundation for the identification of health trends and statistics globally. Receiving input from health experts will greatly improve the representation from current medical practice and create insight from a broader diversity of medicine.

“Literally this is what doctors use to diagnose a patient,” says Tevfik Bedirhan Ustun, coordinator in the Department of Health Statistics and Information Systems. “It is how we define the cause of death when a person dies. In research, it is how we classify health problems based on evidence.”

The ICD is the gold standard for defining and reporting diseases and health conditions. It allows the world to compare and share health information using a common language.

In addition to health providers, the ICD is a key tool used by epidemiologists to study disease patterns, insurers, national health programme managers, data collection specialists, and others who track global health progress and how health resources are spent.

ICD-11 innovations

Using advances in information technology, this ICD revision will allow users to collect data on cause of death, advances in science and medicine, emerging diseases and health conditions, and compare information across the globe with more ease and diversity in the service of public health and clinical reporting.

Some of the key new features of the 11th version will include:

• a new chapter on traditional medicine, which constitutes a significant part of health care in many parts of the world;
• it will be ready to use with electronic health records and applications;
• it will updated through the development phase to reflect new knowledge as it is added to the classification; and
• it will be produced in multiple languages through the development phase.

Further coverage:

http://www.dailypioneer.com/nation/65415-who-seeks-inputs-for-key-disease-database.html

WHO seeks inputs for key disease database

Tuesday, 15 May 2012 00:29
Pioneer News Service | New Delhi

The World Health Organisation (WHO) in a maiden initiative has invited experts and users to contribute online to the development of its next version of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) capturing mortality and morbidity data.

The world’s standard tool provides a picture of the general health of countries and populations and its 11th version is now being developed through an innovative, collaborative process to be released in 2015.

“This is for the first time WHO is calling on experts and users to participate in the revision process through a web-based platform. The outcome will be a classification that is based on user input and needs,” a WHO official said.

Users include physicians, nurses, other providers, researchers, health information managers and coders, health information technology workers, policy-makers, insurers and patient organisations.

WHO will soon be releasing the beta version of what will be ICD-11 on a wiki-type platform that allows stakeholder comments to be added after peer review.

All Member States are expected to use the most current version of the ICD for reporting death and disease statistics (according to the WHO Nomenclature Regulations adopted by the World Health Assembly in 1967), the official added.

Regarding the steps for participating, he elaborated that experts and stakeholders will have to register for a participant account on the web portal which will be open for comments over the next three years and accepted changes will be reflected immediately.

Some of the key new features of the 11th version will include a new chapter on traditional medicine, which constitutes a significant part of health care in many parts of the world and ready to use with electronic health records and applications.

The ICD is translated into 43 languages and is used by all 117 member countries. The ICD holds importance as it provides a common language for reporting and monitoring diseases. This allows the world to compare and share data in a consistent and standard way – between hospitals, regions and countries and over periods of time. It facilitates the collection and storage of data for analysis and evidence-based decision-making, the official said.

ICD-11 Beta drafting platform for release in May 2012

ICD-11 Beta drafting platform for release in May 2012

Post #139 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-1SE

ICD-11 Beta drafting platform

ICD Revision on Facebook has announced that a ‎4th Face to Face meeting of the ICD Revision Topic Advisory Group for Internal Medicine (TAG IM) was held recently, in Tokyo.

No agenda, meeting materials or documents have been posted on the ICD-11 Revision Google site but a PowerPoint presentation prepared by WHO’s, Dr Bedirhan Üstün, is viewable here on the “Slideshare” platform.

Dr Bedirhan Üstün is Coordinator, Classifications, Terminology and Standards, Department of Health Statistics and Information, WHO, Geneva.

You won’t need a PowerPoint .pptx format viewer to view this presentation on the Slideshare site, but you will need a .pptx viewer if you want to download and view the file. (A free .pptx viewer can be downloaded for free from the Microsoft site.)

In order to download the file, you will first need to register with Slideshare or use a Facebook membership as Sign in. If you do agree to download through a Facebook membership, please read and digest the T & C before you agree to Slideshare accessing your Facebook profile data.

View the presentation here:

http://www.slideshare.net/ustunb/tokyo-2012-ustun-show

Tokyo 2012 ustun (show) by Bedirhan Ustun on Feb 10, 2012

for which it states:

“WHO is revising the ICD to be completed by 2015. It is going to enter into a Beta phase by 2012 May during which all stakeholders could see and comment on the ICD as well as propose changes, test in practice.”

Slide #7 states:

2011  : Alpha version (ICD 11 alpha draft)

– + 1 YR  : Commentaries and consultations

2012  : Beta version & Field Trials Version

– + 2 YR Field Trials

2014   : Final version for public viewing

– 2015  : WHA Approval

2015+  implementation

Slides #11 and #12, set out the thirteen parameters of the ICD-11 “Content Model”.

 

The “Content Model”

ICD Revision says that the most important difference between ICD-10 and ICD-11 will be the Content Model.

Content in ICD-11 will be populated in accordance with the ICD-11 Content Model Reference Guide. There is the potential for considerably more content to be included for diseases, disorders and syndromes in ICD-11 than appears in ICD-10, across all chapters:

“Population of the Content Model and the subsequent review process will serve as the foundation for the creation of the ICD-11. The Content Model identifies the basic characteristics needed to define any ICD category through use of multiple parameters (e.g. Body Systems, Body Parts, Signs and Symptoms, Diagnostic Findings, Causal Agents, Mechanisms, Temporal Patterns, Severity, Functional Impact, Treatment interventions, Diagnostic Rules).”

This is the most recent available version of the Content Model Reference Guide January 2011

This iCAT Glossary page gives an overview of the 13 Content Model parameters.

See also Post #62: ICD-11 Content Model Reference Guide: version for December 2010

 

New Beta drafting browser

In May 2011, a publicly viewable ICD-11 Alpha Browser platform was launched.

In July 2011, this platform was opened up to professionals and other interested stakeholders who can register via the site for fuller access and for reading and submitting comments. See the ICD-11 Alpha Browser User Guide for information on how the Browser functions and how to register for increased access. (This is the Alpha/Beta “hybrid” referred to in the WHO-FIC Council conference call report, February 16, 2011: Page 6: PDF for Report)

ICD-11 Revision and Topic Advisory Groups are continuing to use a separate platform for drafting purposes.

Stakeholder participation at the Beta stage

In preparation for the Beta drafting stage, another publicly viewable platform is being developed. According to ICD Revision presentations, this platform will invite and support a higher level of professional and public interaction with the drafting process, with various levels of input and editing authority for interested stakeholders who register for participation. According to editing status, registered stakeholders would be permitted to:

Make comments
Make proposals to change ICD categories
Participate in field trials
Assist in translating

See presentation slides in Dx Revision Watch Posts #70 and #71:

ICD Revision Process Alpha Evaluation Meeting 11 – 14 April 2011: The Way Forward?

ICD Revision Process Alpha Evaluation Meeting documents and PowerPoint slide presentations

 

Slides #15 and #16 of Dr Üstün’s presentation show the methods via which interested stakeholders will be able to register for interaction with the platform.

I will update when more information becomes available on the launch of the Beta platform.

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