World Health Assembly adopts ICD-11: When will member states start using the new edition?

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On May 25, 2019, the 72nd World Health Assembly voted unanimously to adopt the ICD-11, the next edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD).

Endorsement won’t come into effect until January 1, 2022, which is the earliest date that member states can begin using ICD-11 for reporting data.

A stable version of the ICD-11 MMS was released in June 2018 to enable member states to begin planning for implementation.

ICD-11 is an electronic classification containing over 55,000 codes and a considerably more complex product than ICD-10. It has been designed to incorporate or link with other ICD classifications, such as the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), the WONCA* developed International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC), and with the SNOMED-CT and OrphaNet terminologies.

Even the earliest implementers will need several years to evaluate the new edition, determine how they will use ICD-11, complete translations, produce training and implementation materials and prepare their health systems for migration. Japan is understood to be well advanced with translations and planning.

There is no mandatory implementation date: member states will migrate to ICD-11 at their own pace and according to their countries’ needs and resources but there is an expectation that countries will start planning for transition. Some member states may need to develop clinical modifications of ICD-11 for country specific use. A few countries still use ICD-9.

Global implementation of the new edition will be a patchy and prolonged process and during the transition period, WHO will be accepting data reported using both ICD-10 and the new ICD-11 code sets until the majority of member states have transitioned to the new edition. WHO has said that the last update to ICD-10 will be Version 2019.

No member states have announced timeline projections but below is a round-up of ICD-11 transition planning activities already in progress:

*World Organization of National Colleges, Academies and Academic Associations of General Practitioners/Family Physicians.

 

NHS England

NHS England mandates the use of ICD-10 in secondary care (currently using ICD-10 Version 2015).

As a WHO Collaborating Centre and designated UK Field Trial Centre, NHS Digital has taken part in ICD-11 Field Trials.

NHS Digital has said:

No decision has been made for the implementation of ICD-11 in England, however NHS Digital plan to undertake further testing of the latest release and supporting products that will inform a future decision.

NHS Digital Delen: ICD-11 resources page

Proposed Future Additions

Over the coming months, NHS Digital would like to engage and invite all users of ICD to participate and interact with the review process.

To support this, we are proposing to add the following information to our Delen site;

  • A mechanism for questions, issues, concerns and errors relating to ICD-11 to be raised to us as the UK Field Trial Centre.
  • A high-level overview of our future plans
  • Presentations providing more information on ICD-11
  • e-Learning materials to support familiarisation with ICD-11. Topics to include post coordination / cluster coding, chapter and code structure, chapter specific changes and notes, conventions etc
  • Further testing – parallel coding in ICD-10 in real-time. If you would be interested in taking part in this please let us know by emailing icd-11@nhs.net

Until NHS England has implemented ICD-11, the mandatory classification system for use in the NHS remains ICD-10.

Since April 2018, SNOMED CT (which replaces the Read Codes/CTV3 clinical terminology) has been the mandatory terminology system for use in NHS primary care at the point of contact and forms an integral part of the electronic patient record (EPR).

SNOMED CT terminology system is already used in some secondary care settings but is planned to be implemented across all secondary care, acute care, mental health, community systems, dentistry and other systems used in direct patient care by April 2020.

SNOMED CT terminology system and clinical classifications, like ICD-10, work together to fulfil different needs:

Source: Presentation: NHS Digital: Clinical Coding for non coders – Overview of clinical coding, how ICD-10 and SNOMED CT work together, and the role of the Clinical Classifications Service.

For more information on the planning that will be required before ICD-11 can be implemented within the NHS, see BETA – Clinical Information Standards, section: ICD-11 and the new Procedure Based Classification (PBC).

Resources:

NHS Digital Delen Home Page

NHS Digital SNOMED CT resources

SNOMED CT UK Edition browser

 

Australia

Australia uses a modification of the WHO’s ICD-10, known as ICD-10-AM [1].

Australian classification standards and statistics agencies were well represented on the ICD-11 Joint Task Force, with 5 of the Joint Task Force’s 21 members representing Australia, plus co-chair (Dr James Harrison, Director, Research Centre for Injury Studies, Flinders University, Adelaide) and observer (Dr Richard Madden, Professor of Health Statistics and Director National Centre for Classification in Health, University of Sydney).

For comparison, the UK had only an observer on the Joint Task Force; the U.S. had 4 participants and an observer.

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) has been conducting a review of ICD-11 to inform and assist decision-makers about the new edition and its potential for adoption in Australia, see Post: #349: Australia: Potential adoption of ICD-11: Pre-consultation for decision makers.

1 Australian Consortium for Classification Development

 

Canada

Canada uses a modification of the WHO’s ICD-10, known as ICD-10-CA, developed by Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) [1].

CIHI is participating in the testing of ICD-11 and assessing the implications for potential implementation in Canada.

CIHI has said:

…no decision has been made for the implementation of ICD-11 in Canada. CIHI is currently working on a number of initiatives to better understand the differences between ICD-10-CA and ICD-11 to help inform the business and statistical implications of adoption.

April 15, 2019 webinar:

Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) Webinar: Introduction to ICD-11 – Part 1

Introduction to ICD-11 — Part 1 Transcript 

Introduction to ICD-11 — Part 1 Recording

Introduction to ICD-11 — Part 2 Transcript

Introduction to ICD-11 — Part 2 Recording

1 Version 2018 ICD-10-CA/CCI, Canadian Coding Standards and related products

 

United States

The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) is the federal agency responsible for the use of ICD-10 in the United States.

ICD-10 has been used in the U.S. to code and classify mortality data from death certificates since January 1999. NCHS developed a clinical modification of ICD-10 for morbidity purposes (ICD-10-CM) which replaced ICD-9-CM on October 1, 2015.

Since its initial launch, in 2007, the U.S. has maintained high level participation in the ICD-11 development process and its ongoing update and improvement:

The U.S. provided representatives from professional and scientific organisations, academics and practitioners for the ICD-11 Topic Advisory Groups (TAGs) and sub working groups. Stanford Center for Biomedical Informatics Research developed the web based iCAT Collaborative Authoring Platform on which ICD-11 was developed.

The U.S. has representatives on the ICD-11 governance committees via the WHO-FIC Network; the Medical Scientific Advisory Committee (MSAC); the Classifications and Statistics Advisory Committee (CSAC); the Mortality and Morbidity (MbRF) Reference Groups; and the Functioning and Disability Reference Group, which have oversight for the annual updating and ongoing improvement of the global ICD-11 edition.

Dr Geoffrey Reed (WHO, Geneva; Columbia University) is Senior Project Lead for the ICD-11 Mental Health chapter and a member of the MSAC; Steven Hyman, MD (former Director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and former DSM-5 Task Force member) chaired the Topic Advisory Group for Mental Health; Michael B First, MD has served as a key external advisor to the Mental Health chapter.

Dr Christopher Chute (John Hopkins University) chaired the ICD-11 Revision Steering Committee, was a member of the Joint Task Force and now chairs the MSAC; Donna Pickett (Chief, Classifications and Public Health Data Standards, NCHS, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Head, Collaborating Center for the WHO-FIC in North America) co-chaired the Morbidity TAG, was a member of the Joint Task Force and is a member of the CSAC; Dr Robert Anderson (Chief, Mortality Statistics Branch Division of Vital Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) was a member of the Joint Task Force and co-chaired the Mortality TAG; Cille Kennedy (ASPE) co-chaired the ICD-11 Functioning TAG; Sue Bowman (Senior Director of Coding Policy and Compliance, AHIMA) is a representative on the ICD-11 Morbidity Reference Group (MbRF).

Around 25 member states have modified ICD-10 for country specific use.

WHO is still formulating policies around the licensing of ICD-11 but it is understood that the intention is to limit development of national modifications.

See Presentation slides #36-38 for more information on licensing and the development of country modifications: Insights into the Next Revision: Like Texas, Everything is Bigger in ICD-11, Kathy Giannangelo, RHIA, CCS, CPHIMS, FHIMA, Texas Health Information Management Association.

It would be premature to speculate when the U.S. might be ready to migrate to ICD-11 for mortality (cause of death reporting) and whether ICD-11 will be adequate as a morbidity classification system for U.S. use or whether NCHS will need to develop a clinical modification, as it did for ICD-10.

It was put forward at the June 5-6, 2019 NCVHS meeting that the U.S. might potentially use ICD-11 unmodified if WHO were to incorporate some additional terms within the global ICD-11 edition.

NCVHS has initiated the process of planning for transition to ICD-11 at the federal level.

In February 2019, William W Stead, MD, Chair, NCVHS, sent a letter to the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) recommending a simplified process for adopting future versions of ICD. The letter also recommended that HHS should invest now in an ICD-11 evaluation project and develop a plan to enable a smooth, transparent transition from ICD-10 to ICD-11 at the optimal time.

 

NCVHS meetings:

A National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics Full Committee Meeting was held on June 5-6, 2019.

Agenda: Full Committee Meeting-June 5-6, 2019

Presentations were given for Agenda item: ICD-11 Project:

Recording Mp3: Full Committee Meeting-June 5, 2019

Agenda item: ICD-11 Project: presentations and discussions starts 2hrs: 50 mins in from start; closes 5hrs 55mins from start.

Meeting summary: To follow

Transcript: To follow

Presentation slides: To follow

 

Forthcoming NCVHS meeting:

NCVHS Subcommittee on Standards is holding an ICD-11 Evaluation Expert Roundtable Meeting on August 6-7, 2019.

Location, agenda, meeting materials: To follow

 

1 WHO Group Discusses ICD-11 Transition Planning report by Sue Bowman, MJ, RHIA, CCS, FAHIMA for Journal of AHIMA (American Health Information Management Association)

2 Presentation: Status on ICD-11: The WHO Launch National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics, July 18, 2018, Donna Pickett, Chief, Classifications and Public Health Data Standards, Head, Collaborating Center for the WHO-FIC in North America; Robert N. Anderson, PhD Chief, Mortality Statistics Branch Division of Vital Statistics

 

WHO-FIC Africa

WHO-FIC Africa Collaborating Centre has said:

ICD-10 is the current standard for Morbidity (cause of illness) and Mortality (cause of death (COD) coding.

The ongoing implementation and maintenance of ICD-10 for mortality and morbidity coding remain a core focus of the WHO-FIC Collaborating Centre (African region). Following the release of ICD-11 MMS in June 2018, there will be increasing focus on ICD-11 in the work plan of the collaborating centre. Inputs to the development of ICD-11 are essential to ensure that the classification meets regional needs.

WHO-FIC Africa News: WHO on the Implementation of ICD-11, November 2018:

WHO-FIC collaborators met in Pretoria (South Africa) on 7 November 2018, discussing the implications for implementing ICD-11 and ICHI. We linked up with Nenad Kostanjsek from WHO (Geneva), who shared his thoughts about the preparation for implementation of ICD-11.

Download presentation slides

 

Other member states

This table from the eHealth DSI Semantic Knowledge Base project compiles information provided from a number of member states on their use of ICD (or a modification of ICD) and their plans regarding potential future implementation of ICD-11. Information provided by: Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxenbourg, Malta, Netherlands, Portugal, Slovenia and Spain.

Table: Current status of the use of ICD by eHDSI deploying countries (2018)

Resources:

ICD-11: The 11th Revision of the International Classification of Diseases – Site maintained by eHealth DSI Semantic Community providing resources for ICD-10, ICD-11, ICD derivative classifications and other classification and terminology systems

Insights into the Next Revision: Like Texas, Everything is Bigger in ICD-11, Kathy Giannangelo, RHIA, CCS, CPHIMS, FHIMA, Texas Health Information Management Association

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ICD-11 implementation package

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On Saturday, May 25, 2019, member states meeting at the 72nd World Health Assembly voted unanimously to approve the draft resolution to adopt the Eleventh revision of the International Classification of Diseases. The resolution passed with no amendments.

Adoption comes into effect on January 1, 2022, subject to transitional arrangements. After this date, member states can start using or transitioning to the ICD-11 codes when they have prepared their health systems for migration from earlier editions.

Source: Presentation slides: Dr Robert Jakob, November 2018 Information session on ICD-11

 

The two key documents for Agenda Item 12.7 Eleventh revision of the International Classification of Diseases are:

A72/29 Add.1
Eleventh revision of the International Classification of Diseases
Draft Resolution

A72/29
Eleventh revision of the International Classification of Diseases
Report by the Director-General

 

Implementation package

The World Health Organization (WHO) has prepared an implementation package. These tools can be accessed at ICD-11.

 

1) ICD-11 Implementation or Transition Guide (version 1.05, May 2019)

This document is a part of the ICD11 implementation package¹ developed by the World Health Organization. This document also provides some background related to the development of the ICD11 and its components. The document outlines essential issues that countries need to consider in the lead up to and during the transition from an existing ICD environment to the eventual implementation of ICD11.

1 The ICD-11 implementation package comprises the Classification System, the Coding Tool, Browser and all supporting documents including the Reference Guide and Implementation Guide, and a set of tools. Source: ICD-11 Implementation or Transition Guide, Geneva: World Health Organization; 2019; License: CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO.

 

2) Coding tool (multilingual)

Index based search tool.

See Additional resources [1] for NHS overview of ICD-11 Coding Tool.

 

3) ICD-11 browser for Mortality and Morbidity Statistics (MMS)

Blue ICD-11 MMS platform (current release: 04 / 2019)

English: https://icd.who.int/browse11/l-m/en

Spanish: CIE-11 para estadísticas de mortalidad y morbilidad (Versión : 04 / 2019): https://icd.who.int/browse11/l-m/es

See Additional resources [2] for NHS overview of ICD-11 MMS Browser and [3] for general overview of ICD-11.

 

4) ICD-11 Reference Guide (version 11-04-2019)

Detailed guide to ICD-11 and how to use it; update and maintenance workflow; updating cycles; requirements for proposal submission.

 

5) ICD-10 / ICD-11 mapping Tables

Map ICD-11 codes to and from ICD-10 (links to Zip file; crosswalks in Text and MS Excel formats)

 

6) Orange ICD-11 Maintenance Platform

English: https://icd.who.int/dev11/l-m/en

The audience for this site is the maintainers, contributors and translators of the classification. The content of the Orange browser is not the released version of the classification. The content is updated on a daily basis to incorporate changes approved since the most recent release of the Blue ICD-11 browser for Mortality and Morbidity Statistics (MMS).

The Orange Maintenance Platform incorporates the ICD-11 Proposal Mechanism (a proposal and commenting tool for which registration is required). Once an account is registered, new proposals, comments and suggestions for changes and enhancements to existing content can be submitted and notifications set up. For help with submissions see: Maintenance Platform User Guide.

 

Specialty versions and derived classifications

Specialty versions provide more detail for particular user groups, such as Mental Health, Neurology, Dermatology and less detail for primary care or low diagnostic resource settings.

For ICD-11, the WHO Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse has developed a companion publication to ICD-11 Chapter 06 for mental health professionals, general clinical, educational and service use.

The Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines for ICD‐11 Mental, Behavioural and Neurodevelopmental Disorders (CDDG) provides expanded disorder descriptions and includes: essential (required) features, severities, boundaries with other disorders and normality, differential diagnoses, additional features and culture-related features.

WHO has given no firm release date but says the CDDG will be published “as soon as possible” following approval of the overall system by the WHA¹.

Also under development is the ICD-11 PHC – a clinical guideline written in simpler language to assist non-mental health specialists, especially primary care practitioners and non medically trained health workers, and for use in low resource settings and low- to middle-income countries with the diagnosis and management of 27 mental disorders. No finalization and publication date is available. Like the ICD-10 PHC (1996), this revised edition will not be a mandatory classification for member states.

1 Reed GM, First MB, Kogan CS, et al. Innovations and changes in the ICD-11 classification of mental, behavioural and neurodevelopmental disorders. World Psychiatry. 2019;18(1):3-19.

 

Linkages with other classifications and terminologies

ICD11 incorporates or links with the following classifications and terminologies through the ICD11 Foundation:

• International Classification of Disease for Oncology – ICD-O
• International Classification of External Causes of Injury – ICECI
• International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health – ICF
• International Classification of Primary Care – ICPC [Ed: developed/maintained by WONCA]
• Other terminologies such as OrphaNet and SNOMED-CT

Source: ICD-11 Implementation or Transition Guide, Geneva: World Health Organization; 2019; License: CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO.

 

Additional resources:

1 NHS Digital: ICD-11 Coding Tool Overview, September 2018

2 NHS Digital: ICD-11 Browser Overview, September 2018

3 NHS Digital: ICD-11 Overview

4 Presentation: Information session on ICD-11 Dr Robert Jakob, Team Leader, WHO, Geneva, Classifications, Terminologies and Standards, November 2018

Presentation: NHS Digital: Clinical Coding for non coders – Brief overview of clinical coding and the role of the Clinical Classifications Service

6 ICD-11: The 11th Revision of the International Classification of Diseases – Site maintained by eHealth DSI Semantic Community providing resources for ICD-10, ICD-11, ICD derivative classifications and other classification and terminology systems

Seventy-second World Health Assembly (WHA72) opened Monday, 20 May 2019

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Update: Draft resolution A72/29 Add.1 (ICD-11) passed without amendments

Item 12.7 Eleventh revision of the International Classification of Diseases was transferred from the Tenth meeting of Committee A to the Sixth meeting of Committee B, for consideration on Saturday 25 May. Item 12.7 was placed as the second agenda item.

Daily Journal N° 6: Programme of meetings for Saturday, 25 May 2019

Following statements from around 30 Member States reps and 1 Non-State actor (IOGT International), and a response from the Secretariat, the draft resolution to adopt the Eleventh revision of the International Classification of Diseases was passed, with no amendments, at 10:20 Geneva time.

After the meeting has closed, a webcast of the meeting will be available for 3 months (Select Tab for Committee B; Select Sixth meeting of Committee B, 25/05/2019 9:00-).

A Draft report of the Sixth meeting of Committee B will be available in the next day or two on the WHA72 Documents page and I shall post a copy at the top of this post.

——————————————————

The Seventy-second World Health Assembly (WHA72) opened this morning, in Geneva. This year’s Assembly runs from Monday 20 — Tuesday 28 May.

WHA72 website and Documents page

Daily live webcasts

Official Twitter hashtag: #WHA72

“The World Health Assembly is the decision-making body of WHO. It is attended by delegations from all WHO Member States and focuses on a specific health agenda prepared by the Executive Board. The main functions of the World Health Assembly are to determine the policies of the Organization, appoint the Director-General, supervise financial policies, and review and approve the proposed programme budget. The Health Assembly is held annually in Geneva, Switzerland.”

 

A Daily Journal is posted each morning (links for the Daily Journals are on the left of the WHA72 website and Documents page).

Daily Journal N° 1 | Programme of meetings for Monday, 20 May 2019

Daily Journal N° 2 | Programme of meetings for Tuesday, 21 May 2019

Daily Journal N° 3 | Programme of meetings for Wednesday 22 May 2019

Daily Journal N° 4 | Programme of meetings for Thursday, 23 May 2019

Daily Journal N° 5 | Programme of meetings for Friday, 24 May 2019

Daily Journal N° 6 | Programme of meetings for Saturday, 25 May 2019

Daily Journal N° 7 | Programme of meetings for Monday, 27 May 2019

Daily Journal N° 8 | Programme of meetings for Tuesday, 28 May 2019

 

Presentation of ICD-11 MMS for WHA adoption

The Eleventh revision of the International Classification of Diseases is listed as Item 12.7 under Item 12 Other technical matters and is the purview of Committee A.

Item 12.7 is currently expected to be reached on Saturday, 25 May.

Note: Item 12.7 is now 3rd item on Committee A Agenda for Saturday, 25 May. 

Extract Page 5, Daily Journal N° 5:

Live streaming of the Tenth Meeting of Committee A should be available via the webcast page on Saturday 25 May from 9:00 Geneva time. I shall be watching the segment for Item 12.7 when this is reached and will report on any significant discussions, decisions or amendments to the Draft Resolution recommending adoption of the ICD-11 MMS.

(Webcasts for Plenary, Committee A and Committee B meetings will be available for 3 months.)

 

The two key documents for Item 12.7 Eleventh revision of the International Classification of Diseases are:

A72/29 
Eleventh revision of the International Classification of Diseases
Report by the Director-General

and

A72/29 Add.1
Eleventh revision of the International Classification of Diseases
Draft Resolution

 

Draft resolution for consideration by Committee A:

Page 1:

Page 2:

The 72nd Assembly closes on Tuesday, 28 May. Finalization of Committee A resolutions and reports is scheduled for the final day:

 

There are in the region of 55,000 codes in the Eleventh Edition of ICD compared with around 14,400 in ICD-10.

It is anticipated that some Member States and other bodies may continue to raise concerns over specific controversial additions, for example, the inclusion of Gaming disorder. There have also been statements of concern lodged by some Member States regarding the proposed timelines for adoption of ICD-11 and transitional arrangements.

I will update with any significant discussions or amendments to the draft resolution as it currently stands and will post the finalized reports and ICD-11 resolution, when these become available.

 

The Blue ICD-11 MMS platform:

The WHO released a stable version of the ICD-11 for Mortality and Morbidity Statistics (ICD-11 MMS) in June 2018 as a pre-implementation version to enable Member States to begin the process of evaluation, consultations, training, translations and preparing for eventual transition to the new edition.

This initial release was replaced with an updated release in December 2018. The December 2018 version was replaced by a further stable release, in April 2019.

The current release is dated Version : 04 / 2019: https://icd.who.int/browse11/l-m/en

It is unclear whether Version : 04 / 2019 is the version being recommended for adoption on Saturday 25 May, or whether the MMS will be updated this week to reflect the most recent content of the Orange Maintenance Platform, then frozen for presentation next Saturday. If WHO does issue a further release of the Blue Platform, this week, I will update this report.

Update on the status of the classification of PVFS, ME and CFS for ICD-11: Part Three: WHO rejects Dr Dua’s proposal

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Related posts:

Update on the status of the classification of PVFS, ME and CFS for ICD-11: Part One

Update on the status of the classification of PVFS, ME and CFS for ICD-11: Part Two

 

Part Three (and it’s good news, for once)

As reported in Parts One and Two, three proposals for the ICD-10 G93.3 legacy categories, Postviral fatigue syndrome; Benign myalgic encephalomyelitis; and Chronic fatigue syndrome have sat unprocessed in the ICD-11 Proposal Mechanism for over a year:

the proposal by Dimmock & Chapman (submitted March 26, 2017);

the proposal by Dr Lily Chu on behalf of the IACFS/ME (submitted March 31, 2017);

the proposal by Dr Tarun Dua (submitted November 06, 2017).

If you are not registered for access to the ICD-11 Proposal platform, click to download the proposal submitted by Dimmock & Chapman in PDF format.

 

Dr Tarun Dua’s proposal to kick the G93.3 legacy categories out of the Neurology chapter

Dr Tarun Dua is a medical officer working on the Program for Neurological Diseases and Neuroscience, Management of Mental and Brain Disorders, WHO Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse. This WHO department has responsibility for both mental disorders and neurological diseases and disorders. Its Director is Dr Shekhar Saxena.

Dr Dua had acted as lead WHO Secretariat and Managing Editor for ICD Revision’s Topic Advisory Group (TAG) for Neurology, which was chaired by Prof Raad Shakir.

When Dr Dua submitted a proposal, last year, recommending that “Myalgic encephalitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)” [sic] should be removed from the Diseases of the nervous system chapter and reclassified in the Symptoms, signs chapter as a child under Symptoms, signs or clinical findings of the musculoskeletal system, it was initially unstated whose position this controversial recommendation represented.

Read Dr Dua’s proposal in PDF format from Page 5 of this November 2017 commentary.

TAG Neurology had ceased operations in October 2016, leaving proposals for the G93.3 legacy categories hanging and the terms still unaccounted for in the public version of the ICD-11 Beta draft. The terms were eventually restored to the draft in March 2017.

Since early 2017, we had been advised several times by senior WHO officers that decisions regarding these categories were “on hold” while an in-house evidence review was being undertaken.

Moreover, WHO senior classification expert, Dr Robert Jakob, had assured me (via email in March 2017) that WHO had no intention of dumping these categories in the Symptoms, signs chapter — yet here was Dr Dua calling for precisely that.

The key question being: Did this recommendation represent the outcome of a now concluded evidence review or did it represented only the position of Dr Dua?

Dr Dua eventually stated that “…the proposal [had] been submitted on behalf of Topic Advisory Group (TAG) on Diseases of the Nervous System, and reiterates the TAG’s earlier conclusions.” But neither Dr Dua nor her line manager, Dr Saxena, were willing to provide us with responses to other queries raised in relation to this proposal, including, crucially: How does this proposal relate to the in-house evidence review?

We were subsequently advised by WHO’s Dr John Grove (Director, Department of Information, Evidence and Research) that the systematic evidence review would determine if the terms needed to be moved to any other specific chapter of ICD-11 and that the outcomes would be provided for review by the Medical Scientific Advisory Committee (MSAC).

A formal response by Dimmock & Chapman to Dr Dua’s proposal can be read in PDF format here Response by Dimmock & Chapman to Dr Tarun Dua proposal of November 6, 2017.

 

WHO rejects Dr Dua’s proposal 

On November 19, the proposal was marked as Rejected by ICD-11 Proposal Mechanism admins:

Screenshot: Accessed November 20, 2018:

https://icd.who.int/dev11/proposals/f/en#/http://id.who.int/icd/entity/569175314

This decision to reject Dr Dua’s recommendation that the terms should be relocated under the Symptoms, signs chapter is accompanied by a brief rationale from ICD-11 Proposal Platform admins “Team3 WHO”:

Screenshot: Accessed November 22, 2018:

 

Importantly, the decision to retain the terms in the Disorders of the nervous system chapter is supported by the WHO MSAC and CSAC committees.

(See Reference 10 for WHO/ICD-11’s guiding principles for consideration of legacy terms and potential chapter relocations — guidance with which Dr Dua is familiar and has cited, herself, when drafting other proposals, but which she evidently chose to disregard in the case of the G93.3 legacy categories.)

 

This means that these ICD-10 legacy terms continue to stand as per the “Implementation” version of the ICD-11 MMS that was published in June 2018:

https://icd.who.int/browse11/l-m/en#/http%3a%2f%2fid.who.int%2ficd%2fentity%2f569175314

 

But we are not done yet…

It’s not known when the remaining proposals submitted by myself and jointly with Mary Dimmock will be processed.

There remains a backlog of over 1000 unprocessed proposals, a number of which had met the March 30, 2017 proposal deadline and were expected to have been processed last year, in time for consideration for inclusion in the June 2018 “Implementation” release.

According to summary reports of the WHO-FIC Network Council’s April 26 and September 26, 2018 teleconferences:

  • Between June 2018 and the 2019 [World Health Assembly] resolution, WHO will work to improve user guidance around the classification and any final sorting of the extension codes, but there is not an intention to “reopen the package” of ICD-11 or to make major changes
  • The codes will not change after June 2018, and the URIs [Unique Reference Identifiers] will remain the constant, immoveable identifiers for each concept that underpin the classification
  • An update cycle was agreed by JTF [Joint Task Force] last week, including ongoing update of foundation entities (e.g. index terms, synonyms, extension codes, etc.) with
    • annual updates for entities below the shoreline,
    • a 5-year cycle for update of entities above the shoreline, and
    • a 10-year cycles for updates to the rules.

and from the September 26, 2018 teleconference:

  • WHO has updated the proposal platform to allow voting by CSAC* members and to align the process with the historical practices of the URC [ICD-10 Update and Revision Committee].
  • 90 proposals have been identified from the platform for consideration by the CSAC this year, though not all of them can be reviewed in detail face-to-face during the WHO-FIC Network Annual Meeting 2018. A call may be held in advance to discuss some specific priorities.
  • Given the huge volume of proposals, the meeting will go through the new procedures for the CSAC, review the voting process and tools, overview the proposal platform and how to use it, and determine timelines and workload for after the meeting.
  • CSAC governance will also be presented together with the content of ICD-11 prior to submission of the report on ICD-11 to the WHO Governing Bodies for review by the WHO Executive Board [in January 2019]

Source: WHO-FIC Council Google platform: WHO-FIC Council Teleconferences

*The Classifications and Statistics Advisory Committee (CSAC) takes over the role of the ICD-10 Update and Revision Committee (URC). The last update for ICD-10 will be 2019.

 

The ICD-11 MMS is expected to be frozen again in January 2019 in preparation for submission of the report to the Executive Board (EB):

 

Beyond World Health Assembly adoption, ICD-11 will be subject to an update and maintenance cycle:

(See Reference Guide Annex 3.7.1 – 3.7.6 for detailed information on ICD-11 Updating Cycles and Proposal Workflows.)

I’ve been unable to confirm whether the first update released after the June 2018 “Implementation” version would be a January 2019 release, or whether the June 2018 version is intended to remain more or less stable for a further year, until January 2020.

If WHO were to accept any of the proposals contained within my individual submissions and my joint submissions with Mary Dimmock, for example, approving our recommendations for deprecating the prefix “Benign”; deprecating Postviral fatigue syndrome as lead Concept Title; assigning separate Concept Title codes to Myalgic encephalomyelitis and to Chronic fatigue syndrome; or approving Exclusions under Bodily distress disorder (BDD), any approved recommendations would appear initially in the orange ICD-11 Maintenance Platform pending their eventual incorporation into an “Implementation” release.

I will keep you apprised of any significant developments.

 

References:

1 G93.3 Postviral fatigue syndrome, ICD-10 Browser Version: 2016. Accessed November 22, 2018

World Health Organization finally releases next edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) Dx Revision Watch, July 25, 2018

3 8E49 Postviral fatigue syndrome, ICD-11 for Mortality and Morbidity Statistics (ICD-11 MMS) 2018 version for preparing implementation. Accessed November 22, 2018

4 8E49 Postviral fatigue syndrome, ICD-11 (Mortality and Morbidity Statistics) Maintenance Platform. Accessed November 22, 2018 The content made available on this platform is not a released version of the ICD-11. It is a work in progress in between released versions.

A proposal for the ICD-10 G93.3 legacy terms for ICD-11: Part Two. Dx Revision Watch, April 3, 2017

6 PDF: Proposal: Revision of G93.3 legacy terms for ICD-11, Dimmock & Chapman, March 27, 2017

7 Proposal: Revision of G93.3 legacy terms for ICD-11, Dr Tarun Dua, November 6, 2017

8 Response by Dimmock & Chapman to Dr Tarun Dua proposal of November 6, 2017, February 15, 2018

9 ICD-11 Reference Guide June 2018

10 Extract from Response to Dr Dua Proposal of November 6 2017: 4. Compliance with WHO standards and other considerations on relocation, Dimmock & Chapman, February 15, 2018

Update on the status of the classification of PVFS, ME and CFS for ICD-11: Part Two

Post #344 Shortlink: https://wp.me/pKrrB-4rs

Part Two

In Part One, I documented key developments around the potential revision of the G93.3 legacy categories for ICD-11. This report picks up from November 2017.

November 06, 2017: Dr Tarun Dua (Medical Officer, Program for Neurological Diseases and Neuroscience, Management of Mental and Brain Disorders, WHO Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse) posts a new proposal for these terms on the ICD-11 proposal platform.

The proposal recommends moving “Myalgic encephalitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)” [sic] from the Diseases of the nervous system chapter to the Symptoms, signs chapter, as a child under Symptoms, signs or clinical findings of the musculoskeletal system.

Click here to read the full proposal Dr Dua November 06, 2017. (If you are not registered with the drafting platform, a copy of Dr Dua’s proposal is included at the end of this commentary.)

November 2017: Dr Dua and Dr Shekhar Saxena are approached by the Countess of Mar to provide clarifications. Dr Dua responds that “the proposal has been submitted on behalf of Topic Advisory Group (TAG) on Diseases of the Nervous System, and reiterates the TAG’s earlier conclusions.” but provides no other clarifications. Dr Saxena does not engage but passes the communication on to Dr Dua, who says she has forwarded the message to the TAG for its consideration. Nothing further is heard from any of them and the enquiries are left hanging.

January 29, 2018: “Team WHO” (an ICD Revision Admin account) posts this comment under the Dr Dua proposal:

Any decisions regarding this entity are on hold until the results of a review become available.”

February 15, 2018: Dimmock and Chapman submit a robust counter analysis of Dr Dua’s proposal and submit further evidence on March 10.

December 2017 – March 2018: In response to the failure of WHO’s Dr Shekhar Saxena and Dr Tarun Dua to provide adequate clarifications in relation to this proposal, the Countess of Mar is advised to write to Dr John Grove, Director, Information, Evidence and Research and Revision Project Lead to put on record significant concerns for the way in which the potential revision of these ICD categories has been handled, the lack of transparency on the part of TAG Neurology, Revision Steering Group and Joint Task Force, and their unwillingness to engage in dialogue.

Over a number of exchanges, Dr Grove provides the following information:

A systematic evidence review will determine if “the category” needs to be moved to any other specific chapter of ICD-11.

The classification team organizes the review which is expected to be completed by mid April 2018.

The outcomes will be provided for review by the Medical Scientific Advisory Committee (MSAC) and will be posted together with the relevant detail on the proposal platform.

New proposals posted on the platform will become part of the workflows of the maintenance mechanism of ICD-11 and be processed in an annual cycle.

The “relevant category will in any case be kept separate from the generic ‘chronic fatigue’ (signs and symptoms).”*

 

*NB: there is no concept term, ‘chronic fatigue’ in ICD-11’s Symptoms, signs chapter. There is a concept term: Fatigue (which was Malaise and fatigue in ICD-10). In March 2017, a long-standing proposal of mine for the addition of exclusions for Benign myalgic encephalomyelitis and Chronic fatigue syndrome under Fatigue was approved by the Beta draft admins, although the request for exclusion of Postviral fatigue syndrome wasn’t actioned and remains unprocessed.

There are several speculative reasons for this: ICD Revision may be considering retiring the Postviral fatigue syndrome term for ICD-11; or retaining the term, but only as an Index Term. This might also account for Dr Dua’s reluctance to clarify what her proposal’s intentions are for the Postviral fatigue syndrome term.

There has been no indication whether any evidence review was concluded in mid April, what the outcome was, or whether any potential new proposals for these categories are currently with the MSAC. But no new proposals from ICD Revision, the MSAC or Dr Dua’s department have been posted on the proposal platform or entered directly into the development draft (now known as the “Maintenance Platform”).

Where does this currently leave these terms?

This is how the ICD-11 MMS stood for the release of the “advance preview” version, on June 18, 2018.

(Note the version of ICD-11 as released does not display the Foundation Component, nor are the current 15 Synonyms and Index terms displayed in this “advance preview” release):

https://icd.who.int/browse11/l-m/en#/http%3a%2f%2fid.who.int%2ficd%2fentity%2f569175314

 

As released in June 2018, the content of the ICD-11 MMS is planned to remain stable until January 2019, when it will be prepared for presentation at the May 2019 World Health Assembly.

The Proposal Mechanism will remain open for submission of new proposals from the MSAC, CSAC and public stakeholders. There is a backlog of over 1300 proposals waiting to be processed.

There are currently three proposals for PVFS, BME and CFS waiting to be reviewed:

The proposal submitted by Dimmock & Chapman (on March 26, 2017)

The proposal submitted by Dr Lily Chu on behalf of the IACFS/ME (on March 31, 2017)

The proposal submitted by Dr Tarun Dua (on November 06, 2017)

 

ICD Revision might potentially post new proposals for PVFS, ME and CFS via the Proposal Mechanism at any point in the future.

While new proposals are expected to be processed as part of the annual maintenance cycle, any approved proposal would not immediately be reflected in the released version of the ICD-11 MMS but carried forward for eventual incorporation into a later release, according to the update cycle for that particular class of change. (See Annex 3.7 of the Reference Guide for maintenance and update schedules, how “Minor” and “Major” changes are defined, guidance on submitting new proposals etc.)

My interpretation of the Reference Guide is that relocation of a category to another chapter would constitute a “Change a primary parent” and a “Structural Change” and would be classed as a “Major Change”, for incorporation on the 5 year update cycle, not the annual update cycle.

It is not yet clear in which year the first update cycle is anticipated to start, i.e., whether the next stable release would be published in January 2020, or if the first update cycle is not scheduled to start until a later year.

 

How soon will member states start using ICD-11?

World Health Assembly endorsement will not come into effect until January 01, 2022. After this date, member states can start using ICD-11 for reporting data when their health systems have transitioned to the new edition.

Dr Christopher Chute, chair of ICD-11’s Medical and Scientific Advisory Committee (MSAC), predicts that early implementers may require at least five years to prepare their countries’ health systems for transition. Member states using a “clinical modification” of ICD are likely to take longer to develop, test and roll out a country specific adaptation — particularly the United States.

There is no mandatory implementation date — member states will migrate to ICD-11 at their own pace. Global adoption will likely be a patchy and prolonged process and for a period of time, the WHO will be accepting data reported using both ICD-10 and the new ICD-11 code sets.

No countries have announced tentative implementation schedules.

NHS Digital says: “No decision has been made for the implementation of ICD-11 in England, however NHS Digital plan to undertake further testing of the latest release and supporting products that will inform a future decision.”

Until the UK has implemented ICD-11, the mandatory classification and terminology systems for use in the NHS are ICD-10 (Version: 2015) and SNOMED CT UK Edition.

Part One

 

References:

1 G93.3 Postviral fatigue syndrome, ICD-10 Browser Version: 2016. Accessed August 14, 2018

World Health Organization finally releases next edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) Dx Revision Watch, July 25, 2018

3 8E49 Postviral fatigue syndrome, ICD-11 for Mortality and Morbidity Statistics (ICD-11 MMS) 2018 version for preparing implementation. Accessed August 14, 2018

4 8E49 Postviral fatigue syndrome, ICD-11 (Mortality and Morbidity Statistics) Maintenance Platform. Accessed August 14, 2018 The content made available here is not a released version of the ICD-11. It is a work in progress in between released versions.

5 ICD Revision Joint Task Force Meeting Report 22-22 January, 2017, Cologne, Germany. Page 39, Item 39: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Advocacy Efforts. Accessed August 14, 2018

A proposal for the ICD-10 G93.3 legacy terms for ICD-11: Part Two. Dx Revision Watch, April 3, 2017

PDF: Proposal: Revision of G93.3 legacy terms for ICD-11, Dimmock & Chapman, March 27, 2017

7 Proposal: Revision of G93.3 legacy terms for ICD-11, Dr Tarun Dua, November 6, 2017

8 Response by Dimmock & Chapman to Dr Tarun Dua proposal of November 6, 2017, February 15, 2018

9 ICD-11 Reference Guide June 2018

10 Extract from Response to Dr Dua Proposal of November 6 2017: 4. Compliance with WHO standards and other considerations on relocation, Dimmock & Chapman, February 15, 2018

Update on the status of the classification of PVFS, ME and CFS for ICD-11: Part One

Post #343 Shortlink: https://wp.me/pKrrB-4r3

Part One

In the World Health Organization’s ICD-10, Postviral fatigue syndrome is classified in the neurological chapter of the Tabular List (at G93.3, under parent block: G93 Other disorders of brain, in Chapter VI: Diseases of the nervous system).

Benign myalgic encephalomyelitis is the inclusion term under Postviral fatigue syndrome and takes the same code. Chronic fatigue syndrome isn’t included in the Tabular List but is indexed in the Alphabetical Index to the G93.3 code.

ICD-10 and ICD-11 do not include the composite terms: “myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome”, “ME/CFS” or “CFS/ME” and composite terms will not be used in this report.

This is how the terms appear in the online browser version of the ICD-10 Tabular List. If you enter “Chronic fatigue syndrome” into the Search field, a drop down displays the code that Chronic fatigue syndrome is indexed to:

http://apps.who.int/classifications/icd10/browse/2016/en#/G93.3

 

Release of ICD-11

In Post #339 I reported on the release, in June 2018, of an “advance preview” version of ICD-11. This version has been released to enable countries to evaluate the new edition, plan for implementation, prepare translations and begin training health professionals. The WHO still has a lot of work to do before the full ICD-11 “implementation package” and companion publications are completed.

ICD-11 is scheduled for presentation at the World Health Assembly (WHA) in May 2019 for adoption by member states but WHA endorsement won’t come into effect until January 01, 2022. After that date, member states can begin using the new edition for data reporting — if their health systems are ready. There is no mandatory implementation date and member states will be migrating to ICD-11 at their own pace and according to their countries’ specific timelines, requirements and resources.

 

Update on classification for ICD-11

The progression of these three ICD-10 categories through the ICD-11 drafting process has been shambolic, mired in obfuscation, immensely frustrating for stakeholders — and still not resolved.

If you would prefer to jump to a report on how these three terms currently stand in ICD-11, as released in June 2018, and skip the key developments, go to Part Two

Key developments: tracking the progress of the ICD-10 G93.3 categories through the iCAT, Alpha and Beta drafting phases, between May 2010 and June 2018:

May 2010: The ICD-10 parent class, Other disorders of brain, is retired for ICD-11. Its retirement affects a number of categories that sit under it, not just Postviral fatigue syndrome.

A change of hierarchy between the three terms is proposed (Screenshot).

Chronic fatigue syndrome is proposed to replace Postviral fatigue syndrome as the new “Concept Title” term, with Benign myalgic encephalomyelitis specified as its inclusion term (Screenshot). Postviral fatigue syndrome is proposed to be relocated under Synonyms to new Concept Title, Chronic fatigue syndrome.

All three terms are later removed from under parent block: Other disorders of the nervous system and placed in a “holding pen” for categories for which decisions are needed to be made or while further chapter restructuring is being carried out.

February 2013: The Beta drafting platform admins or the managing editors for Topic Advisory Group for Neurology inexplicably remove CFS, BME and PVFS from the public version of the Beta platform. No rationale is provided for their removal. No comments or suggestions for edits can be submitted for these terms since the terms are no longer displaying in the draft. This is how proposals for the terms had stood in early 2013, at the point at which they were removed from the public draft (Screenshot).

July 2015: Following a teleconference with the WHO’s Dr Robert Jakob and Anneke Schmider, Chapman and Dimmock provide ICD Revision and Topic Advisory Group for Neurology with a list of neurological and immunological studies and other resources to inform the revision process and the literature review.

February 2017: The three terms have now been missing from the public version of the Beta drafting platform for over four years.

Advocates and international patient organizations lobby the co-chairs and members of the ICD Revision Joint Task Force to place the matter of the continued absence of these terms from the public Beta draft on the agenda for the Joint Task Force’s February 20-22, 2017 meeting, in Cologne.

These appeals do result in the matter being tabled for discussion, as noted in the Meeting Report (Item 39, p39). But no immediate action is taken to restore the missing terms to the Beta draft and no progress report on intentions for these terms is forthcoming.

March 26, 2017: PVFS, BME and CFS are finally restored to the Beta draft under Other disorders of the nervous system, but with this caveat from the Beta draft admin team:

While the optimal place in the classification is still being identified, the entity has been put back to its original place in ICD. Team WHO 2017-Mar-26 – 14:46 UTC

PVFS is restored as the lead (Concept Title) term, as it is in ICD-10. BME and CFS are both specified as Inclusion terms. There is a list of around 15 alternative and historical terms under Synonyms and Index Terms — but “the optimal place in the classification is still being identified.”

At this point, ICD-11 has been under development for nearly ten years but Topic Advisory Group for Neurology has yet to publish any progress reports on its proposals for these ICD-10 categories.

This is how the terms stood after they were restored to the Beta draft in March 2017:

 

March 27, 2017: Suzy Chapman and Mary Dimmock finalize and submit a detailed proposal and rationale for PVFS, BME and CFS via the Beta draft proposal platform. This submission meets the March 30, 2017 proposal deadline. The proposal and rationale is supported by international patient organizations and patients. Click to download a PDF of the Proposal and Rationale.

(This proposal remains unprocessed and uncommented on by ICD Revision despite having met the proposal deadline.)

November 06, 2017: A new proposal for these terms is posted by Dr Tarun Dua.

Dr Dua is Medical Officer, Program for Neurological Diseases and Neuroscience, Management of Mental and Brain Disorders, WHO Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse. This WHO department has responsibility for both mental disorders and neurological diseases. Its Director is Dr Shekhar Saxena.

Dr Dua had acted as lead WHO secretariat and managing editor to the Topic Advisory Group for Neurology, which had been chaired by Prof Raad Shakir.

It is initially unclear who owns this proposal and whose position it represents since Topic Advisory Group for Neurology had ceased operations in October 2016, leaving proposals for these terms hanging. We had been advised by the WHO several times since early 2017 that a literature review was still in progress:

Is this proposal the outcome of a now concluded literature review and do these recommendations already have the approval of ICD Revision?

Or does this proposal represent only the position of Dr Dua or the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse?

Four weeks after submitting these recommendations, Dr Dua responds:

“…the proposal has been submitted on behalf of Topic Advisory Group (TAG) on Diseases of the Nervous System, and reiterates the TAG’s earlier conclusions.”

but neither Dr Dua, Dr Saxena or (what remains of) TAG Neurology will provide any responses to requests for additional clarifications.

 

Dr Tarun Dua’s proposal

The proposal recommends that “Myalgic encephalitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)” [sic] should be removed from the Diseases of the nervous system chapter and reclassified in the Symptoms, signs chapter, as a child under Symptoms, signs or clinical findings of the musculoskeletal system.

Note that Dr Dua has not taken the existing ICD category terms as her reference point — ICD does not use the term, “Myalgic encephalitis” or the composite terms, “Myalgic encephalitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome” or “ME/CFS.”

It is not evident from the proposal what Dr Dua/TAG Neurology intends to do with the current Concept Title, Postviral fatigue syndrome — which the proposal does not mention, at all. Nor can it be determined what new hierarchy is being proposed between the terms. Nor is any rationale provided for using different nomenclature to the existing ICD terms.

Leaving aside the proposal, per se, the rationales that accompany it, the misconceptions contained within it and the narrow range of studies it relies on, the submission is sloppy and not fit for purpose.

The rationale for the proposal includes:

“…the lack of evidence regarding any neurological etiopathogenesis of chronic fatigue syndrome…

“When there is sufficient evidence and understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms, diagnostic biomarkers, and specific treatments, the syndrome can be appropriately classified within the proper block.

“The predominant symptom of those with ME/CFS present is severe fatigue, a manifestation of skeletal muscle dysfunction…

“Epidemiological and Pathophysiological evidence is limited, conflicting, and does not support ME/CFS as a disease of the nervous system or with a principally neurobiological underpinning…

“ME/CFS is thus not a disease of the nervous system. It should be categorized in the Signs and Symptoms chapter given the lack of clear evidence pointing to the etiology and pathophysiology of this syndrome until evidence to organ placement is clarified in years to come.”

 

Click here to read the full proposal Dr Dua November 06, 2017. (If you are not registered for access to the proposals platform, a copy of Dr Dua’s proposal is included at the end of this commentary for ease of access.)

One also has to question why this proposal was submitted at this point when advocates had been advised several times that an in-house evidence review was in progress.

This proposal from a staffer in the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse (submitted apparently on behalf of a retired external advisory group) appeared to sit outside that evidence review. But when questioned about the proposal’s status, no-one within WHO seemed to want to have to acknowledge its existence or clarify whether and how it related to the evidence review.

 

Lack of consensus between WHO staffers and ICD Revision

In March 2017, Dr Robert Jakob, Team Leader Classifications and Terminologies, had given the assurance, via an email sent to Suzy Chapman (Dx Revision Watch) and CCd to Stefanie Weber; Dr Christopher Chute; Linda Best; Molly Meri Robinson Nicol; Dr Geoffrey Reed; Dr Tarun Dua; Dr Ties Boerma and the Countess of Mar, that:

“As discussed earlier, chronic fatigue syndrome will not be lumped into the chapter ‘signs and symptoms.'”

Yet this proposal submitted by Dr Dua proposes to do just that.

Evidently, there is a lack of consensus between the WHO’s senior classification lead, Dr Robert Jakob, and Dr Dua/TAG Neurology.

Dr Dua’s proposal also fails to take into consideration WHO/ICD-11 guiding principles on relocation of legacy terms to other chapters. For an expanded commentary on ICD-11 principles concerning potential relocations see Extract from Response to Dr Dua Proposal of November 6 2017.

Nor do the recommendations consider any proposed relocation in the context of data collection, statistical analysis and backward compatibility with ICD-10 and its clinical modifications.

To continue with the status of these terms in the ICD-11 draft, up to its release in June 2018, go to Part Two

 

References:

1 G93.3 Postviral fatigue syndrome, ICD-10 Browser Version: 2016. Accessed August 14, 2018

World Health Organization finally releases next edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) Dx Revision Watch, July 25, 2018

3 8E49 Postviral fatigue syndrome, ICD-11 for Mortality and Morbidity Statistics (ICD-11 MMS) 2018 version for preparing implementation. Accessed August 14, 2018

4 8E49 Postviral fatigue syndrome, ICD-11 (Mortality and Morbidity Statistics) Maintenance Platform. Accessed August 14, 2018 The content made available here is not a released version of the ICD-11. It is a work in progress in between released versions.

5 ICD Revision Joint Task Force Meeting Report 22-22 January, 2017, Cologne, Germany. Page 39, Item 39: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Advocacy Efforts. Accessed August 14, 2018

A proposal for the ICD-10 G93.3 legacy terms for ICD-11: Part Two. Dx Revision Watch, April 3, 2017

PDF: Proposal: Revision of G93.3 legacy terms for ICD-11, Dimmock & Chapman, March 27, 2017

7 Proposal: Revision of G93.3 legacy terms for ICD-11, Dr Tarun Dua, November 6, 2017

8 Response by Dimmock & Chapman to Dr Tarun Dua proposal of November 6, 2017, February 15, 2018

9 ICD-11 Reference Guide June 2018

10 Extract from Response to Dr Dua Proposal of November 6 2017: 4. Compliance with WHO standards and other considerations on relocation, Dimmock & Chapman, February 15, 2018

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