WHO Collaborating Centre confirms Revision Steering Group seriously considering extension to ICD-11 timeline

Post #289 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-3E8

Update at January 30, 2014:

ICD-11 Revision has confirmed that a decision has now been taken to postpone ICD-11 by a further two years, from 2015 to 2017.

From WHO site: “The International Classification of Diseases 11th Revision is due by 2017”

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Information in this report relates to the development of the World Health Organization’s ICD-11. It does not apply to the forthcoming US specific, NCHS developed, clinical modification of ICD-10, known as ICD-10-CM.

Ustun 34

Source: Slide 34: Where are we? What remains to be done? Shall we have ICD WHA submission in 2015 or later? B Üstün, World Health Organization Classifications, Terminologies, Standards ICD Revision: Quality Safety Meeting, September 2013

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The December newsletter of the WHO Collaborating Centre for the Family of International Classifications (FIC) in the Netherlands reports that ICD-11 Revision Steering Group (RSG) is reviewing options for a further extension to the ICD-11 development timeline [1]:

Newsletter on the WHO-FIC, Volume 11, Number 2, 2013, Latest News, Page 3 [PDF]

The Revision Steering Group and WHO Secretariat seriously consider amending the timeline of submitting the ICD-11 for endorsement by the World Health Assembly to allow more time for field testing in multiple countries and settings, and following up on resulting edits. WHO currently discusses options and scenarios with stakeholders.

This announcement from WHO-FIC’s Marijke de Kleijn-de Vrankrijker reinforces information and resources provided in my September report (WHO considers further extension to ICD-11 development timeline) – that ICD-11 Revision is failing to meet development targets and delaying submission of ICD-11 for WHA for approval until 2016, or alternatively, extending the timeline by a further two years, for WHA approval in 2017, is under consideration.

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ICD-11 already four years behind original targets

The revision of ICD-10 and development of the structure for ICD-11 began in 2007. WHO’s original goal had been to complete the revision and release of ICD-11 by 2011-12, Archived documents [2] [3].

By 2009, the date for submission of ICD-11 for WHA approval had been extended to 2014. The launch of the public version of the Beta drafting platform was later postponed from May 2011 to May 2012.

The current projection for submission of ICD-11 for approval to WHA is May 2015, with dissemination in 2015+ [4].

Mayo’s Christopher Chute, MD, chairs the ICD-11 Revision Steering Group. According to Chute, in this paper published in March 2012, publication of ICD-11 is “expected around 2016″:

Chute CG, Huff SM, Ferguson JA, Walker JM, Halamka JD. There Are Important Reasons For Delaying Implementation Of The New ICD-10 Coding System. Health Aff March 2012 DOI: 10.1377/hlthaff.2011.1258
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ICD Revision considers its options

In September, WHO posted this meeting materials document [5] and this slide presentation [6]. The document summarized, inter alia, ICD-11’s progress, current development status, timelines for finalization date and approval by WHO Governing Bodies, and rationales and options for a further shift in the timeline.

You can read extracts from the document and view slides setting out the options currently under consideration in this report: WHO considers further extension to ICD-11 development timeline, selected of which I am appending to this post.

The earliest ICD-11 might be ready for dissemination is late 2015/16 – which may require some further scaling back of the project’s goals.

But if ICD-11 Revision Steering Group does elect to postpone submission for World Health Assembly approval until May 2017, dissemination of ICD-11 may not be viable before 2018.

I will update this post if and when WHO or ICD-11 Revision Steering Group publish a statement of clarification on the WHO website or issue a news release, or if other information becomes available that confirms a revision to the timeline.

Implementation date

I’ve noted some confusion in reporting and comments around ICD-11 approval by WHA and dissemination and implementation dates.

Unlike the U.S. specific ICD-10-CM, there is no mandatory date by which Member States must switch from using ICD-10 to ICD-11.

World Health Assembly adoption of ICD-11 and ICD-11 implementation dates are separate. WHA adoption enables official use for countries who wish to move on to the next edition. But Member States using ICD-10 will transition to the next version at their own convenience [6].

Once approved, prepared for implementation and released, global adoption of ICD-11 isn’t going to happen overnight. It may take several years before WHO Member States transition from ICD-10 to ICD-11. Low resource and developing countries may take longer to prepare for and transition to the new edition.

The annual update process for ICD-10 will continue during the creation of ICD-11.

Extracts from document [5] setting out the rationale and options for postponement of WHA Approval:

[…]

3. Progress and Current Status of ICD Revision:

[…]

BETA PHASE:

At this point in time, 1 September 2013, an ICD2013 Beta version has been produced for review purposes and field trials after 6 years of drafting phases.

The current ICD 2013 Beta version has relatively stable classification lists (i.e. linearizations) for Mortality and Morbidity recording. It will be reviewed by the specific Mortality Reference Group and the Morbidity Reference Group to see how well it fits the purpose and proposed transition from ICD‐10.

In addition, the Beta version has planned processes for:

(i) Systematic international scientific peer review (ii) Submission of additional proposals from public groups and scientists (iii) Conducting field trials for its applicability and reliability (iv) Production support in multiple languages (translations) starting with WHO official languages (v) Preparations for transitions from ICD‐10 to ICD‐11.

[…]

6. Timelines

The current ICD Revision Process timeline foresees that the ICD is submitted to the WHA in 2015 May and could then be implemented. Between now and 2015, there remains 20 months to conduct the remaining tasks summarized above as: 1. Reviews, 2. Additional Proposals, 3. Field Trials, 4. Translations, and 5. Transition Preparations.

Given the technical requirements these steps could be expedited in the next 20 months. The experience obtained thus far, however, suggests that this timeframe will be extremely tight for paying due diligence to the work especially in terms of: appropriate consultations with expert groups; communication and dissemination with stakeholders; and sufficient time for field testing in multiple countries and settings, and carrying out the resulting edits.

WHO Secretariat would like to discuss this with all stakeholders and evaluate the possible options:

a. Keep ICD submission to WHA to 2015 as originally planned and implementation / adoption date may be free by any Member State (current position – no change).

b. Postpone submission to WHA to a later year to allow longer time for field trials and other transition preparations.

[…]

In conclusion:

(a) WHO Secretariat could produce an ICD 2015 ready including Mortality and Morbidity Linearizations, Reference Guide and Index with the appropriate resolution to go to the World Health Assembly. This timeframe, however, is extremely tight for paying due diligence to the work especially in terms of: appropriate consultations with expert groups; and sufficient time for field testing in multiple countries and settings, and carrying out the resulting edits

(b) If the timeline is advanced to 2016, there will be more time to have ICD 2016 version with more translations and incorporations of some field tests results.

(c) If the timeline is advanced to 2017, ICD 2017 will be ready with most Field Test results incorporated and maintenance scheme tested.

[…]

Slide presentation: B Üstün, World Health Organization Classifications, Terminologies, Standards, ICD Revision: Quality Safety Meeting 2013 September 9-10

Where are we? What remains to be done? Shall we have ICD WHA submission in 2015 or later?

Slide 34:

Ustun 34rule

Slide 35: [WHA Approval timeline – options under consideration]

Ustun 35rule

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References:

1. Newsletter on the WHO-FIC, Volume 11, Number 2, 2013, Latest News, Page 3. WHO Collaborating Centre for the Family of International Classifications (FIC) in the Netherlands.

2. IUPsyS Mar 08 Agenda Item 25 ICD-10 International Union of Psychological Science COMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS ACTION, March 28–30, 2008, Agenda Item No. 25: Revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) and Involvement of Psychology.

3.  Exhibit 1 WHO Letter Aug 07 Letter Saxena, WHO, to Ritchie, IUPsyS (International Union for Psychological Science), August 2007.

4. ICD-11 Timeline: http://www.who.int/classifications/icd/revision/timeline/en/index.html

5. Committee for the Coordination of Statistical Activities, Twenty-second Session 4-6 September 2013, Items for discussion and decision: Item 8 of the provisional agenda, 3 September 2013, Pages 8-10: http://unstats.un.org/unsd/accsub/2013docs-22nd/SA-2013-12-Add1-Health-WHO.pdf

6. Slide presentation: ICD Revision: Where are we? Bedirhan Üstün, World Health Organization Classifications, Terminologies, Standards, ICD Revision: Quality Safety Meeting 2013, September 9-10, 2013, Slides 29-35: http://www.slideshare.net/ustunb/icd-2013-qs-tag-260276686

WHO considers further extension to ICD-11 development timeline

Post #275 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-3sc

Information in this report relates to the World Health Organization’s ICD-11, currently under development. It does not apply to the current ICD version (ICD-10) or to the forthcoming US specific “clinical modification” of ICD-10, known as ICD-10-CM.

Timeline slippage

Documents posted recently by the World Health Organization (WHO) indicate that ICD Revision is failing to meet development targets and a further extension to the ICD-11 timeline is under consideration.

ICD serves as the international health information standard for the collection, classification, processing and presentation of disease-related data in national and global health statistics.

The 10th edition (ICD-10) was adopted by the World Health Assembly in 1990.

The development process for the next edition (ICD-11) began in April 2007, with ICD-11 scheduled for dissemination by 2012 and the timelines for the development of ICD-11 and DSM-5 running more or less in parallel [1] [2].

Early on in the revision process, the ICD-11 dissemination date was extended. By 2009, the final draft was scheduled for World Health Assembly (WHA) approval in 2014. In order to be ready for global implementation in 2015, the technical work on ICD-11 would need to be completed by 2012 [3].

The WHA approval date was subsequently shunted from 2014 to 2015 – four years later than originally planned and the current, projected implementation date is 2016+.
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“…And just a small detail: who will do all this work?” [4]

ICD-11 is a very ambitious and under-resourced project. Given the scale of the undertaking, the technical complexity, the limited funding and human resources, the feasibility of the project reaching its targets by May 2015 has proved unrealistic.

I have written a number of times on this site that I did not envisage dissemination of ICD-11 by 2016 without some scaling back of the project’s scope – or an announcement, at some point this year, of a further extension to the timeline.

ICD-11 Revision Steering Group considers its options

WHO has recently posted a meeting materials document [5] and a slide presentation [6] which summarize, inter alia, ICD-11’s progress, current development status and timelines for finalization date and approval by WHO Governing Bodies.

ICD Revision is considering extending the timeline by up to a couple of years.

This 14 page document Committee for the Coordination of Statistical Activities, Twenty-second Session 4-6 September 2013, Items for discussion and decision: Item 8 of the provisional agenda can be downloaded here

or opened on Dx Revision WatchPDF: SA-2013-12-Add1-Health-WHO

It summarizes the status of the ICD Revision process under section headings:

1. Background: need and mandate
2. General organization structure of the multiple streams of work
3. Progress and current status
4. The remaining steps
5. Further maintenance of ICD after finalization
6. Timelines for the finalization date and approval by WHO Governing Bodies

Extracts from the document setting out the rationale and options for postponement of WHA Approval:

[…]

3. Progress and Current Status of ICD Revision:

[…]

BETA PHASE:

At this point in time, 1 September 2013, an ICD2013 Beta version has been produced for review purposes and field trials after 6 years of drafting phases.

The current ICD 2013 Beta version has relatively stable classification lists (i.e. linearizations) for Mortality and Morbidity recording. It will be reviewed by the specific Mortality Reference Group and the Morbidity Reference Group to see how well it fits the purpose and proposed transition from ICD‐10.

In addition, the Beta version has planned processes for:

(i) Systematic international scientific peer review
(ii) Submission of additional proposals from public groups and scientists
(iii) Conducting field trials for its applicability and reliability
(iv) Production support in multiple languages (translations) starting with WHO official languages
(v) Preparations for transitions from ICD‐10 to ICD‐11.

[…]

6. Timelines

The current ICD Revision Process timeline foresees that the ICD is submitted to the WHA in 2015 May and could then be implemented. Between now and 2015, there remains 20 months to conduct the remaining tasks summarized above as: 1. Reviews, 2. Additional Proposals, 3. Field Trials, 4. Translations, and 5. Transition Preparations.

Given the technical requirements these steps could be expedited in the next 20 months. The experience obtained thus far, however, suggests that this timeframe will be extremely tight for paying due diligence to the work especially in terms of: appropriate consultations with expert groups; communication and dissemination with stakeholders; and sufficient time for field testing in multiple countries and settings, and carrying out the resulting edits.

WHO Secretariat would like to discuss this with all stakeholders and evaluate the possible options:

a. Keep ICD submission to WHA to 2015 as originally planned and implementation / adoption date may be free by any Member State (current position – no change).

b. Postpone submission to WHA to a later year to allow longer time for field trials and other transition preparations.

[…]

In conclusion:

(a) WHO Secretariat could produce an ICD 2015 ready including Mortality and Morbidity Linearizations, Reference Guide and Index with the appropriate resolution to go to the World Health Assembly. This timeframe, however, is extremely tight for paying due diligence to the work especially in terms of: appropriate consultations with expert groups; and sufficient time for field testing in multiple countries and settings, and carrying out the resulting edits

(b) If the timeline is advanced to 2016, there will be more time to have ICD 2016 version with more translations and incorporations of some field tests results.

(c) If the timeline is advanced to 2017, ICD 2017 will be ready with most Field Test results incorporated and maintenance scheme tested.

[…]

If WHO/ICD-11 Revision Steering Group does elect to postpone submission for WHA approval until May 2017, dissemination of ICD-11 may not be scheduled before 2018.

Once approved and released, adoption of ICD-11 won’t happen overnight. It may take several years before WHO Member States adopt ICD-11. Low resource and developing countries may also take longer to prepare for and transition to the new edition.

Note for US readers: According to Page 3332 of DHSS Office of Secretary Final Rule document (Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 11 / Friday, January 16, 2009 / Rules and Regulations):

“…We [ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee] discussed waiting to adopt the ICD-11 code set in the August 22, 2008 proposed rule (73 FR 49805)…

“…However, work cannot begin on developing the necessary U.S. clinical modification to the ICD-11 diagnosis codes or the ICD-11 companion procedure codes until ICD-11 is officially released. Development and testing of a clinical modification to ICD-11 to make it usable in the United States will take an estimated additional 5 to 6 years. We estimated that the earliest projected date to begin rulemaking for implementation of a U.S. clinical modification of ICD-11 would be the year 2020.” [7]

This projection, in early 2009, would have been based on the assumption that ICD-11 was anticipated to be finalized and submitted for WHA Approval by 2014 (now potentially shifting to 2017).

An additional two year delay in the finalization of the ICD-11 code sets would likely impact on the development process for a clinical modification of ICD-11 for US specific use, kicking adaptation and implementation of an ICD-11-CM even further down the road.

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This slide presentation, below, was uploaded to Slideshare on September 9 by Dr Bedirhan Üstün, Coordinator, Classification, Terminology and Standards, World Health Organization, and also sets out the postponement options now under consideration:

Slide presentation: World Health Organization Classifications, Terminologies, Standards

ICD Revision: Quality Safety Meeting 2013 September 9-10

Where are we? What remains to be done? Shall we have ICD WHA submission in 2015 or later?

http://www.slideshare.net/ustunb/icd-2013-qs-tag-26027668

Slide 29:

Ustun 29rule

Slide 30:

Ustun 30rule

Slide 34:

Ustun 34rule

Slide 35: [WHA Approval – options under consideration]

Ustun 35rule
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References

1. Agenda Item No. 25: Revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) and Involvement of Psychology International Union of Psychological Science Committee on International Relations Action, March 28–30, 2008 IUPsyS Mar 08 Agenda Item 25 ICD-10

2. Letter Saxena, WHO, to Ritchie, IUPsyS (International Union for Psychological Science), August 2007 Exhibit 1 WHO Letter Aug 07

3. Dr Geoffrey Reed, Ph.D., May 2009, personal correspondence.

4. Closing remarks, PowerPoint presentation: “Proposal for the ICD Beta Platform”, Stanford team, 12.04.11, WHO, Geneva.

5. Committee for the Coordination of Statistical Activities, Twenty-second Session 4-6 September 2013, Items for discussion and decision: Item 8 of the provisional agenda, 3 September 2013 Full document in PDF format

6. Slide presentation: ICD Revision: Where are we? Bedirhan Ustun, World Health Organization Classifications, Terminologies, Standards, ICD Revision: Quality Safety Meeting 2013, September 9-10, 2013 http://www.slideshare.net/ustunb/icd-2013-qs-tag-26027668

7. DHSS Office of Secretary Final Rule document (Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 11 / Friday, January 16, 2009 / Rules and Regulations), Page 3332.

ICD-10-CM Release for 2014 now available

Post #270 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-3iT

ICD-10-CM Release for 2014 now available

Prior to implementation, the codes in ICD-10-CM are not valid for any purpose or use.

The World Health Organization’s (WHO) International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) was published in 1992 and is used in over a hundred countries worldwide.

A number of countries have been authorized by WHO to develop “Clinical Modifications” – adaptations of ICD-10 for country specific use. These differ in the number of chapters, codes and subcategories. Specific conditions are present in some adaptations but not all clinical modifications [1]. All modifications to the ICD-10 must conform to WHO conventions for ICD.

Canada uses an adaptation called ICD-10-CA, Australia uses ICD-10-AM, Germany uses ICD-10-GM and Thailand uses ICD-10-TM.

The U.S. lags behind most of the rest of the world and is still using a Clinical Modification of the WHO’s long since retired, ICD-9.

A U.S. specific adaptation of ICD-10 has been under development for a considerable length of time but is scheduled for implementation on October 1, 2014.

Transition to ICD-10-CM is required for everyone covered by the Health Insurance Portability Accountability Act (HIPAA).

Implementation schedules for Large Practices; Small and Medium Practices; Small Hospitals and Payers can be found on the CMS website, here: Implementation Timelines.

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2014 release of ICD-10-CM

The 2014 release of ICD-10-CM is now available from the CDC website. It replaces the July 2012 release.

Prior to the implementation date of October 1, 2014, the codes in ICD-10-CM are not valid for any purpose or use.

The ICD-10-CM code set is currently subject to partial code freeze. For information on the code freeze see Partial Freeze of Revisions to ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM/PCS.

October 1, 2011 was the last major update of ICD-10-CM/PCS until October 1, 2015. Between October 1, 2011 and October 1, 2015, revisions to ICD-10-CM/PCS will be for new diseases/new technology procedures or minor revisions to correct any reported errors in these classifications. Regular (at least annual) updates to ICD-10-CM/PCS will resume on October 1, 2015.

Information on the ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM/PCS update and revision processes and the public NCHS/CDC Coordination and Maintenance Committee meetings can be found on this CDC page: Coordination and Maintenance Committee.

Downloading the ICD-10-CM code sets

The ICD-10-CM Preface, Guidelines, Tabular List, Index and associated documentation can be downloaded from this page: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/icd/icd10cm.htm#10update.

The PDF of the Preface is in a single PDF file here: ICD-10-CM Preface 2014

The PDF of the Guidelines is in a single PDF file here: ICD-10-CM Guidelines

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To access the PDFs for the ICD-10-CM Tabular List and Index, the files need extracting from Zip files from this link:

ICD-10-CM List of codes and Descriptions (updated 7/3/2013)

( ftp://ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/Publications/ICD10CM/2014/ )

Select this file, below, on the CDC site and open it. It is a large file of over 15MB so you will need to allow sufficient time for it to fully load:

06/19/2013 08:28AM 15,223,965 ICD10CM_FY2014_Full_PDF.zip

It will unpack these five PDF files, which can be opened and viewed in situ or saved:

ICD10CM_FY2014_Full_PDF_DIndex  4,222 KB  [ICD-10-CM INDEX TO DISEASES and INJURIES]

or open unzipped PDF on Dx Revision Watch: ICD-10-CM 2014 Full Index

ICD10CM_FY2014_Full_PDF_EIndex   [401 KB]  [ICD-10-CM External Cause of Injuries Index]

ICD10CM_FY2014_Full_PDF_TableOfDrugs   [2,193 KB]

ICD10CM_FY2014_Full_PDF_TableOfNeoplasms   [646 KB]

ICD10CM_FY2014_Full_PDF_Tabular   [7, 398 KB]  [ICD-10-CM TABULAR LIST of DISEASES and INJURIES]

or open unzipped PDF on Dx Revision Watch: ICD-10-CM Tabular List

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For five PDF files of Addenda go to this page:

ftp://ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/Publications/ICD10CM/2014/

and select this file:

06/19/2013 08:28AM 582,584 ICD10CM_FY2014_Addenda.zip

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Comparison between classifications and codings in ICD-10-CM and ICD-10

The WHO’s ICD-10 Volume 1 The Tabular List isn’t made available as a PDF file but can be accessed on a searchable electronic browser platform here: ICD-10 Version: 2010.

The Tabular List for ICD-10 contains more textual descriptions for the categories in Chapter V (the mental and behavioural disorders chapter) than other chapters in ICD-10.

There are also two “speciality” volumes for ICD-10 Chapter V for Clinical descriptions and diagnostic guidelines (known as the “Blue Book”) and Diagnostic criteria for research (known as the “Green Book”).

The U.S. specific ICD-10-CM will not contain this depth of textual content within its Chapter 5.

CDC’s, Donna Picket, has confirmed that CMS/CDC does not plan to adapt the “Blue Book” specifically for U.S. use in conjunction with Chapter 5 of ICD-10-CM [2]. Nor are there plans for an official CMS/CDC crosswalk between ICD-10-CM’s Chapter 5 classifications and codes and those in ICD-10 Chapter V [3].

In the U.S., since 2003, the ICD-9-CM diagnostic codes have been mandated for third-party billing and reporting by HIPAA for all electronic transactions for billing and reimbursement. Following implementation on October 1, 2014, the ICD-10-CM codes sets will become mandatory.

This also applies to the coding of mental and behavioural disorders. APA’s DSM-IV disorder diagnoses are crosswalked to ICD-9-CM codes, or their nearest equivalent, for billing and reimbursement.

The DSM-5, published in May this year, includes the crosswalk codes for both the existing ICD-9-CM and the forthcoming ICD-10-CM codes.

For comparison between

ICD-10-CM Chapter 5 Mental, Behavioral and Neurodevelopmental disorders (F01-F99)

and ICD-10 Chapter V Mental and behavioural disorders (F00-F99) see the ICD-10 online browser or

The ICD-10 Classification of Mental and Behavioural Disorders Clinical descriptions and diagnostic guidelines (The “Blue Book”)

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References and further resources

1. The development, evolution, and modifications of ICD-10: challenges to the international comparability of morbidity data. Jetté N, Quan H, Hemmelgarn B, Drosler S, Maass C, Moskal L, Paoin W, Sundararajan V, Gao S, Jakob R, Ustün B, Ghali WA; IMECCHI Investigators. Med Care. 2010 Dec;48(12):1105-10. doi: 10.1097/MLR.0b013e3181ef9d3e [PMID: 20978452].

The development, evolution and modifications of ICD-10: challenges to the international comparability of morbidity data: Nathalie Jetté MD, November 2009, Slide Presentation [5 MB].

2. Personal communication.

3. Personal communication.

4. Information for providers, payers and vendors on transition to ICD-10-CM can be found here on the CMS website.

5. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services: ICD-10-CM/PCS MYTHS AND FACTS ICN 902143, April 2013.

6. American Psychological Association: Nine frequently asked questions about DSM-5 and ICD-10-CM, APA Practice staff answer questions about billing, determining diagnoses and more related to the two diagnostic classification systems. Practice Update, May 16, 2013.

7. American Psychiatric Association: Insurance Implications of DSM-5

8. AAPC What is ICD-9-CM?

CMS expected to announce proposal for new ICD-10 implementation date sometime in April

CMS expected to announce proposal for new ICD-10 implementation date sometime in April

Post #153 Shortlink: http://wp.me/pKrrB-218

In a press release on February 16, Health and Human Services Secretary, Kathleen G. Sebelius, announced HHS’s intent to initiate a process to postpone the date by which certain health care entities have to comply with ICD-10-CM diagnosis and procedure codes.

The final rule adopting ICD-10-CM as a standard was published in January 2009, when a compliance date of October 1, 2013 had been set – a delay of two years from the compliance date initially specified in the 2008 proposed rule.

Several sites covering CMS’s intention to delay implementation are citing April as the month in which a new timeline for ICD-10-CM is expected to be announced:

HC Pro

New ICD-10 implementation date expected in April

ICD-10 Trainer | March 21, 2012

CMS plans to announce a new ICD-10 implementation date sometime in April, according to representatives of CMS and MassHealth, a public health insurance program for low and medium-income residents in Massachusetts.

Renee Washington, director of customer system integration at MassHealth, revealed the time frame for the much anticipated announcement during the Massachusetts Health Data Consortium’s March 9 conference call. Renee Richard from the CMS Regional Office in Boston confirmed this information during the call…

HC Pro Just Coding

Healthcare News: CMS targets April for release of new ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation date

March 20, 2012

CMS expects to release a new ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation date sometime in April. That date will be the same for payers and providers. (Excerpt from a member only article.)

ICD-10 Watch (no connection with this site which was formerly known as “DSM-5 and ICD-11 Watch”)

It’s about time for an ICD-10 delay announcement

Carl Natale | March 30, 2012

It looks like next week is when the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) will announce their proposals for a new ICD-10 timeline.

Which should mean they will publish it in the Federal Register and take public comment for 60 days. Then they will consider the feedback and issue a final rule. Who knows when that will be…

Read full round up by Carl Natale

 

Christopher Chute, MD, (Chair, ICD-11 Revision Steering Group) et al set out the case for delaying implementation, in this paper published at Health Affairs:

Health Affairs

At the Intersection of Health, Health Care, and Policy

There Are Important Reasons For Delaying Implementation Of The New ICD-10 Coding System

Abstract: http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/early/2012/03/21/hlthaff.2011.1258.abstract

Full free text: http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/early/2012/03/21/hlthaff.2011.1258.full

PDF: http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/early/2012/03/21/hlthaff.2011.1258.full.pdf+html

Published online before print March 2012, doi: Health Aff March 2012 10.1377/hlthaff.2011.1258

There Are Important Reasons For Delaying Implementation Of The New ICD-10 Coding System

Christopher G. Chute 1,*, Stanley M. Huff 2, James A. Ferguson 3, James M. Walker 4 and John D. Halamka 5

Author Affiliations

1 Christopher G. Chute (chute@mayo.edu) is a professor of biomedical informatics at Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minnesota.
2 Stanley M. Huff is a professor of biomedical informatics at the University of Utah, in [please provide city], and chief medical informatics officer at Intermountain Healthcare, in Murray, Utah.
3 James A. Ferguson is a fellow at the Kaiser Permanente Institute for Health Policy and vice president of health information technology strategy and policy for Kaiser Permanente, in Oakland, California.
4 James M. Walker is chief health information officer of Geisinger Health System, in Danville, Pennsylvania.
5 John D. Halamka is a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, chief information officer at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and chief information officer at Harvard Medical School, in Boston, Massachusetts.
*Corresponding author

Abstract

Federal authorities have recently signaled that they would consider delaying some aspects of implementation of the newest version of the International Classification of Diseases, known as ICD-10-CM, a coding system used to define health care charges and diagnoses. Some industry groups have reacted with dismay, and many providers with relief. We are concerned that adopting this new classification system for reimbursement will be disruptive and costly and will offer no material improvement over the current system. Because the health care community is also working to integrate health information technology and federal meaningful-use specifications that require the adoption of other complex coding standardization systems (such as the system called SNOMED CT), we recommend that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services consider delaying the adoption of ICD-10-CM. Policy makers should also begin planning now for ways to make the coming transition to ICD-11 as tolerable as possible for the health care and payment community.

Full free text

Tom Sullivan, for Health Care IT News, asks Chute, “Why not just skip right to ICD-11?”

Why not just skip right to ICD-11?

Tom Sullivan, Government Health IT| March 13, 2012

…While industry associations battle over the code set’s future, and HHS figures out when the new compliance deadline will be, the World Health Organization (WHO) is already moving toward ICD-11, promising a beta in 2014 to be followed by the final version in 2015. Should that slip until 2016, U.S. health entities will still be settling into ICD-10 when ICD-11 arrives – meaning that shortly thereafter, we will be right back where we are now: Behind the times, on the previous ICD incarnation.

Are we repeating our own faulty history?

“That almost assuredly will be the case,” said Chris Chute, MD, DrPH, who spearheads the Mayo Clinic’s bioinformatics division and chairs the WHO’s ICD-11 Revision Steering Group…

Read full article by Tom Sullivan

Rhonda Butler argues why US health care providers and industry can’t just ditch ICD-10-CM and wait for ICD-11 in 2015/16:

3M Health Information

We Can’t Skip ICD-10 and Go Straight to ICD-11

Rhonda Butler | March 26, 2012

Since the recent announcement by CMS that ICD-10 implementation will be delayed for certain healthcare entities, some industry pundits have argued, “Let’s just skip ICD-10 and go straight to ICD-11.”

Skipping ICD-10 assumes that we haven’t started implementing ICD-10. Well, the U.S. did start—19 years ago.

What have we been doing for the last 19 years…

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Letter from Justine M. Carr, MD, Chairperson, National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics to The Honorable Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services, March 2, 2012

Contains ICD-10-CM timeline

    Re: Possible Delay of Deadline for Implementation of ICD-10 Code Sets

James Phillips asks Michael First (Editor of DSM-IV-TR, Consultant to WHO ICD-11 Revision) how DSM-5 relates to ICD:

Psychiatric Times

DSM-5 In the Homestretch—1. Integrating the Coding Systems

James Phillips, MD | 07 March 2012

With DSM-5 scheduled for publication a little more than a year from now, we may safely assume that, barring unannounced surprises from, say, the APA Scientific Review Committee, what we will see on the DSM-5 Web site is what we will get. With that in mind it’s time to review what we will indeed get. But before moving to significant changes in the major disorder categories, we should remind ourselves where DSM-5 fits into the larger picture of coding mental illnesses.

There are, in case you have forgotten, two classificatory systems of mental disorders—the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), produced by the World Health Organization (WHO), and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM), produced by the American Psychiatric Association. How are they related? It is a question that has confused me, and I assume, some of my psychiatric colleagues as well as others—other mental health professionals, and still others. For an answer to this question I asked Michael First, MD, Editor of DSM-IV-TR, Consultant on the WHO ICD-11 revision…

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Related posts:

HHS Secretary Sebelius announces intent to delay ICD-10-CM compliance date  February 16, 2012

AHIMA: Ten Reasons to Not Delay ICD-10 (ICD-10-CM)  February 23, 2012

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